The next pope r.e. Liturgy
#51
Indeed.
Reply
#52
(01-08-2010, 02:31 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Not to mention the deplorable change from "Mass" or "Holy Mass" to "Eucharist" in the common language of many Latin countries. It's frequent to see "Eucharist at 10h and 12h" in Church pamphlets.

Could you please explain what is wrong with the term "Eucharist"?  I don't understand what your objection is.
Reply
#53
(01-08-2010, 03:41 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(01-08-2010, 02:31 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Not to mention the deplorable change from "Mass" or "Holy Mass" to "Eucharist" in the common language of many Latin countries. It's frequent to see "Eucharist at 10h and 12h" in Church pamphlets.

Could you please explain what is wrong with the term "Eucharist"?  I don't understand what your objection is.

The Most Holy Eucharist is the Sacrament itself. The Holy Mass is the name we give to the whole liturgical action. Don't you find it odd that they felt the need all of a sudden to stop calling the Mass a Mass, to call it the Eucharist? It's another modernist ploy.
Reply
#54
(01-08-2010, 03:49 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(01-08-2010, 03:41 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(01-08-2010, 02:31 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Not to mention the deplorable change from "Mass" or "Holy Mass" to "Eucharist" in the common language of many Latin countries. It's frequent to see "Eucharist at 10h and 12h" in Church pamphlets.

Could you please explain what is wrong with the term "Eucharist"?  I don't understand what your objection is.

The Most Holy Eucharist is the Sacrament itself. The Holy Mass is the name we give to the whole liturgical action. Don't you find it odd that they felt the need all of a sudden to stop calling the Mass a Mass, to call it the Eucharist? It's another modernist ploy.

But wouldn't calling the entire liturgy  "Eucharist" focus people's attention on the Sacrament as being the central event?  I would think this would be a good thing, especially when so many aspects of the NO do the opposite.
Reply
#55
(01-08-2010, 04:11 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(01-08-2010, 03:49 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(01-08-2010, 03:41 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(01-08-2010, 02:31 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Not to mention the deplorable change from "Mass" or "Holy Mass" to "Eucharist" in the common language of many Latin countries. It's frequent to see "Eucharist at 10h and 12h" in Church pamphlets.

Could you please explain what is wrong with the term "Eucharist"?  I don't understand what your objection is.

The Most Holy Eucharist is the Sacrament itself. The Holy Mass is the name we give to the whole liturgical action. Don't you find it odd that they felt the need all of a sudden to stop calling the Mass a Mass, to call it the Eucharist? It's another modernist ploy.

But wouldn't calling the entire liturgy  "Eucharist" focus people's attention on the Sacrament as being the central event?  I would think this would be a good thing, especially when so many aspects of the NO do the opposite.

So was the Church "missing something" before Vatican II by calling the Liturgy the Mass?
Reply
#56
(01-08-2010, 10:44 AM)Stephanos Wrote: The next pope will be Peter the Roman.  Liturgical reform won't matter because the world will be ending.  ;)

Not to derail this thread, but: could this Cardinal possibly be the "Peter the Roman" spoken of by St. Malachy?

http://www.africa-times-news.com/2009/10/4270/

I don't know what his views are on the liturgy or the TLM. I think Cardinal Arinze would have been chosen by the Holy Ghost to be Pope after the death of Pope JP II, but wasn't because of his hostility towards the TLM. 
Reply
#57
(01-08-2010, 04:16 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(01-08-2010, 04:11 PM)JayneK Wrote: But wouldn't calling the entire liturgy  "Eucharist" focus people's attention on the Sacrament as being the central event?  I would think this would be a good thing, especially when so many aspects of the NO do the opposite.

So was the Church "missing something" before Vatican II by calling the Liturgy the Mass?

No.  It was obvious then that the Sacrament was central, so it was not necessary to try to draw attention to it by the name.
Reply
#58
I hate when people start talking about the Papacy in terms of race or nationality. It reminds me too much of political jargon and worldly thinking. "Well, when are we going to have a black Pope?"; "Having an African Pope would call into attention the fight against poverty!", etc.

Those things don't matter, the Papacy isn't just another political office but the single most important office a man can have: to be Vicar of Christ on earth. For many centuries, most popes were of Italian origin. Did that make the Church less universal? Of course not.

Furthermore, I don't know much about that Ghanian Cardinal. The only think that matters to me is if His Eminence is traditional or not.
Reply
#59
(01-08-2010, 04:39 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(01-08-2010, 04:16 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(01-08-2010, 04:11 PM)JayneK Wrote: But wouldn't calling the entire liturgy  "Eucharist" focus people's attention on the Sacrament as being the central event?  I would think this would be a good thing, especially when so many aspects of the NO do the opposite.

So was the Church "missing something" before Vatican II by calling the Liturgy the Mass?

No.  It was obvious then that the Sacrament was central, so it was not necessary to try to draw attention to it by the name.

Neither it was necessary in the 60's or now. The only necessary thing is to re-educate Catholics about the reality of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and abolish the NO.
Reply
#60
(01-08-2010, 04:39 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: I hate when people start talking about the Papacy in terms of race or nationality. It reminds me too much of political jargon and worldly thinking. "Well, when are we going to have a black Pope?"; "Having an African Pope would call into attention the fight against poverty!", etc.

Those things don't matter, the Papacy isn't just another political office but the single most important office a man can have: to be Vicar of Christ on earth. For many centuries, most popes were of Italian origin. Did that make the Church less universal? Of course not.

Exactly.

We have had African popes before though.  Pope Victor was African and the first Pope to use Latin in the mass (that is recorded).
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)