Bipolar - fact or fiction?
#11
Arun, it never hurts to do more reading. Be aware, this is an informational and support site - not a substitute for medical (or spiritual) advice. 

http://helpguide.org/mental/bipolar_diso...atment.htm < Diagnosis & Treatment Options
http://helpguide.org/mental/bipolar_diso...ations.htm < Medications
http://helpguide.org/mental/bipolar_diso...f_help.htm < Self Help
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#12
ta, thanks.
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#13
(01-09-2010, 12:44 AM)Arun Wrote: After a readthru of symptoms, both manic phase and depressive phase, it appears that this entire "disorder" is merely an attempby atheistic rationality to explain the spiritual consolation/desolations referred to during Ignatian retreats.
It's more than just moods. It's the difference between ripples in a pond and a Tsunami. And because it's a mental illness, it has another problem. The organ that is sick decides when it's well. Doesn't work too good. If you take antibiotics, they'll tell you to take the whole regimen, don't stop just because the swelling and fever have subsided. And people generally will. Put someone on lithium, they'll stop as soon as they feel happy. And then crash even harder. I've known several bipolars and it takes them 2 or 3 times to finally learn to not stop taking it when they're in a manic mode. 
Quote:Also, even if the "disorder" were a real illness, why on earth would anybody treat an internal chemical imbalance with more chemicals (such as lithium, or quetiapine)?
How else would you counteract a chemical imbalance? If my swimming pool shows the pH is too high - an internal imbalance - I add muriatic acid. More chemicals. I could try other acids; sulfuric acid would smell. Vinegar would smell, and it would need a lot. Lemon juice would leave organic residue which would feed algae. I use the chemical with the most benefit and the least side effect.
Quote: 
Surely homeostasis would be much easier  to achieve through a process of detoxification and monitored balances of nutritional input...?
any thoughts on this one?
Nutritional imput.... you mean eat foods that are higher in certain substances? Aren't the substances just chemicals? And detoxification from what? The meds? Or just in general? A poor diet doesn't cause bipolar. A good diet is just a good idea all around, but I doubt it's a cure-all for anything but gross obesity. And even then, the dosage of food has to be correct!
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#14
No amount of "proper" eating is gonna cure Bi-Polar. It could no sooner cure cancer.It IS a disease. My sister is a good Catholic girl, its not devil inflictions. She has a chemical imbalance, and sometimes you need to take other chemicals to restore the balance.  Unfortunately, shes one of the Bi polar people who wont medicate themselves, making life very hard for her, her daughter, and the whole family. If you have ver lived with someone diagnosed with this, you cant deny its validity.
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#15
The negative effects of drugs are unfortunate. I would guess that if the negative effects of the drugs were better than the negative effects of Bipolar, then drugs would be the logical course.

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#16
To be honest, as stupid as it sounds, one of the main reasons (aside from my massive bad experience with the quetiapine) for trying to find some wormhole out of having to take meds, is I don;t want it to affect my archery. Either by affecting my accuracy/consistency &c. or perhaps by making it easier for them to just stroll right in and say "he's on meds now, in the system now, he can't have this" and take my bow away.
Also I don't fancy my chances of stalking a fallow at 20 yards on dried frog pills.
one of the few things that ground me so to speak.
and CC, yes it is very hard on my family that I won't take meds as well. They are riding the swing/shift just as hard as I am lol.
Luckily my wife is really supportive, and knows I don;t want to be medicated. Basically this thread was really an attempt at finding some way out, a loophole or something.
The thing about triggers &c. is apparently legit, but difficult, though. There's a lady whose husband sufefrs from it, and she runs a blog, they struggle through that method. Anybody know more about how to do that, let me know.

Ros.. I mean.. Herr Man-in-a-wig (sorry couldn' resist... prob won;t be the last time either lol Sticking tongue out at you ) the negative effects of the drugs seem to me to outweigh the negative effects of the disorder, given that I've lived for 23 years without the drugs. Not always an easy ride, but at least I'm familiar with it, you know?

SoCal, some good points there.

Anyways, I know that there are people out there who manage and function without meds. If onlyI could figureout how to do taht meself lol.
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#17
There's an interesting story in the NYTimes today on mental illness generally. I wouldn't take it as a license to avoid treatment for conditions that are known to respond to pharmacological interventions, but it provides food for thought:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/10/magazi...che-t.html
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#18
(01-11-2010, 02:00 AM)Arun Wrote: Ros.. I mean.. Herr Man-in-a-wig (sorry couldn' resist... prob won;t be the last time either lol Sticking tongue out at you ) the negative effects of the drugs seem to me to outweigh the negative effects of the disorder, given that I've lived for 23 years without the drugs. Not always an easy ride, but at least I'm familiar with it, you know?
Well, my hair is natural, not a wig.

If that is how you see it, then it would be logical to try going without drugs. However, I hope your perception is not skewed, like if a psychosis develops.

Quote:Anyways, I know that there are people out there who manage and function without meds. If onlyI could figureout how to do taht meself lol.
Yeah, but giving that sort of advice would probably be unwise, as it is would be giving medical advice and that is a no-no for the non-licensed. Like everyone else, you can work to maintaining your health, especially getting enough of the vitamins and fats used for the nervous system (which everyone should do, but most do not).
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#19
Cool advice, cheers man.
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#20
I agree with most of what has been said and I'll keep you in my prayers. I do have a friend, though, who has BPD and treats both phases with meds and he is a successful, funny grad student at a top university in religious studies. Does he suffer from side-effects? Probably, but each person has to find a regimen that will suit them best. If the joy of archery outweighs your suffering from the disorder, great, that's your choice, but the options are always there if you find the balance is thrown off again.
I would try to find an understanding doctor who is willing to try different things with you, start at small doses, etc (as all doctors should) and also to find a small pharmacy to get your stuff at - smaller pharmacies tend to be quieter and have more time to answer your questions and listen to your concerns.
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