Bipolar - fact or fiction?
#21
(01-11-2010, 02:00 AM)Arun Wrote: Herr Man-in-a-wig

Isn't it "Hair-Man...in-a-wig"?

Wink
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#22
Hehehe that would've been most likely better.

Anyways, here's a question primarily for Californians and Canucks - does anybody know of (where it is legal) medicinal marijuana being prescribed as a suitable treatment for bipolar disorder?
Main reason I ask is, it's no secret (I don't hide it) that I have had an extensive history of drug abuse in the springtime of  squanderous youth, and while I have never fallen back into hard drug use, or psychedelics, I have once or twice since becoming Catholic (in the early transitional days mainly) slipped up and had a bit of a smoke here and there. The thing I noticed was it tends to ground me, and sort of enforces a balance point between the two poles.
Medicinal marijuana is legal here, but has never been prescribed in the history of our nation. However, it is things like what I have mentioned that raise questions.
I don't miss the old life, and I don't want any association or re-immersion in "pot culture" or other drug using sub-cultural groups.
All I want is some control over this swing/shift nonsense. The few times I have been able to objectively observe, this seemed to work. I functioned perfectly normally within society for many years, in a state of constant marijuana intoxication in my youth, and I believe if it really works it'd much better than any other current alternative for bipolar.

So, anybody know anything about this at all? I am only really interested in hearing about the level of effectiveness &c. as far as morality and legislation go I submit to the authority of Holy Mother Church on the issue, and will not seek out or use any substance without legitimate prescription &c.
Just wanna hear if anybody else finds it to help, in which case I will throw my voice into the alredy very strong lobby going for medicnal usage here in NZ.
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#23
As a Canuk I can say it's pretty rare and I am 99% sure it wouldn't be given for BPD; it's usually written for cancer patients for its appetite-stimulating, analgesic, and/or antiemetic properties, from what I understand. Much more common are synthetic canniboids like Cesamet or straight cannaboids like Sativex, but they are both very expensive and are legally very restricted narcotics in Canada. I remember learning in high school that marijuana can bring out schiziophrenic episodes in people that are prone, no? I think you'd be hard-pressed to find a doctor willing to write a script for marijuana for somebody with a mental illness. But I would discuss it with a doctor anyway, honesty is the best policy in finding the best treatment for you, and maybe that'll give him or her an idea of what you think your ideal functioning condition would be.
You mention before feeling like a zombie on quetiapine and lithium, you didn't feel at all like a zombie on marijuana?
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#24
A couple of words of caution: I think that if you have a tendency to be suspicious of worldly powers generally--the government, the media, the banking system, etc.--there can be a strong temptation to assume that doctors, too, are prone to being less than entirely honest. It might be natural to think they're involved in some sinister cabal with drug and insurance companies to steer you towards treatments on some basis other than achieving the optimal outcome for your health. Moreover, if you have a history of drug use, you will tend, quite unconsciously at times, to look for any excuse to go back to using. So if I were you, I would be very skeptical of that inner voice suggesting that getting high is the appropriate response to having mood swings. Particularly if there's any risk of arrest and imprisonment involved in getting marijuana where you live, I would think arranging and carrying out the transactions, needing to smoke up on the sly, etc. could trigger manic episodes. When people are manic, they can get pretty grandiose, and the sensation of being an outlaw, someone who's outsmarted the medical community and the establishment otherwise, could really tend to feed that. And marijuana is definitely habit forming. The withdrawal may be of a different nature than withdrawal from opiates, for instance, but getting into a situation where you can't get your fix could also be detrimental to your effort to balance your moods.

Are you being honest with your doctor about your thoughts?
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#25
(02-13-2010, 02:11 PM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: A couple of words of caution: I think that if you have a tendency to be suspicious of worldly powers generally--the government, the media, the banking system, etc.--there can be a strong temptation to assume that doctors, too, are prone to being less than entirely honest. It might be natural to think they're involved in some sinister cabal with drug and insurance companies to steer you towards treatments on some basis other than achieving the optimal outcome for your health. Moreover, if you have a history of drug use, you will tend, quite unconsciously at times, to look for any excuse to go back to using. So if I were you, I would be very skeptical of that inner voice suggesting that getting high is the appropriate response to having mood swings. Particularly if there's any risk of arrest and imprisonment involved in getting marijuana where you live, I would think arranging and carrying out the transactions, needing to smoke up on the sly, etc. could trigger manic episodes. When people are manic, they can get pretty grandiose, and the sensation of being an outlaw, someone who's outsmarted the medical community and the establishment otherwise, could really tend to feed that. And marijuana is definitely habit forming. The withdrawal may be of a different nature than withdrawal from opiates, for instance, but getting into a situation where you can't get your fix could also be detrimental to your effort to balance your moods.

Are you being honest with your doctor about your thoughts?

Haha at the moment I am trying to chase up the MH specialist to get another appointment - and have been chasing for a few months. As far as 'inner voice" suggesting going back to anything, it's not like that. As I mentioned, I don't want to be some kind of druggie, that's dead and gone. All I want is something that works. I don;t belive that there is a large-scale conspiracy by doctors &c. but  do believe money talks, hence the pharmceutical prescritptons for anythign thats wrong.
I will not use marijuana, even medicinally, unless I do so within the scope of the law, I have no desire to transgress the law in this case.
Anyways, only point I was really making was that, compared to everything else I have tried, I have found it to work.

And Elizabee I most definitely have never felt like a zombie on marijuana. In fact, I cognitively function quite well on it (on those occasions on which I have used it.)
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#26
Oops forgot to mention; Wilfred, part of the point of my consideration of this as a viable treatment was the fact that it provides a homeostatic grounding without bias towards either the depressive or manic phases.
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#27
(02-13-2010, 10:37 PM)Arun Wrote: Oops forgot to mention; Wilfred, part of the point of my consideration of this as a viable treatment was the fact that it provides a homeostatic grounding without bias towards either the depressive or manic phases.

If that's your experience, then I can see why you would favor marijuana as a treatment for your mood swings. Certainly, the medicinal properties of cannabis have been known for millenia. I was watching a program about India just this evening in which the recipe for soma in the Rig Veda was described as consisting of poppy, cannabis, and ephedra (derived from a plant called som which gave its name to the drink).
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