Maybe the real reason High Fructose Corn Syrup is so bad?
#1
Genetically Modified Corn Linked to Organ Damage

<--not the article
A new study has linked the genetically modified corn made by global agriculture giant Monsanto to liver and kidney failure. The Huffington Post reports that the results were announced by the International Journal of Biological Sciences. In addition to damaging the kidneys and liver, effects on “heart, adrenal, spleen and blood cells were also frequently noted.”

Three varieties of the corn are approved by food authorities for consumption in the United States (as well as other countries). Monsanto “gathered its own crude statistical data after conducting a 90-day study,” even though 90 days is too short a time for chronic health issues to emerge, “and concluded that the corn was safe for consumption.” Now that’s just good science.
<--end of summary

See the article here:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/01/12...20365.html
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#2
I can't get this link to work. :confused:
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#3
(01-17-2010, 12:39 AM)SearchingCatholic Wrote: I can't get this link to work. :confused:

Not sure what the problem is, works for me...
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#4
Check out this post on Barrons where the Monsanto PR Person jumps right in, but until someone else points it out, does not disclose her relationship to the company

http://blogs.barrons.com/stockstowatchto...e-in-rats/
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#5
Corn has been screwed with so much over the years that I wouldn't be surprised if it's actually just made out of petroleum and uranium anymore.  But you can't avoid eating corn if you tried.
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#6
I'd like to know where I might get safe seeds to grow a patch of it in a garden. Not that I have one, but I am hoping to scout out a community plot somewhere nearby, soon.
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#7
Google "heirloom seeds".

Here are a couple of examples:

http://www.victoryseeds.com/

http://www.seedsavers.org/
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#8
(01-22-2010, 04:44 PM)Anthem Wrote: Google "heirloom seeds".

Here are a couple of examples:

http://www.victoryseeds.com/

http://www.seedsavers.org/

What he said, the heirloom 'movement' is the way to go.

Also, delicious 'forgotten' veggies that aren't as 'economically feasible' (profitable) for margin obsessed factory farming.
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#9
Like parsnips? (but they are not good for Texas. They taste best after a good hard frost.)
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