What do Chinese Moon Cakes taste like?
#11
There are actually a couple versions.  Some have a semi-sweet red bean paste in them, others have lotus paste, which tastes sort of like penut butter (at least to me).  I think there might also be a third kind, which I avoid because it is yucky.  Moon cakes can be made with or without the egg yolk center.  I personally dislike the egg yolk center, but it is there to symbolize the moon.  Moon cakes are eaten during the mid-autumn moon festival (along with peeled taro root dipped in sugar), so you can probably find them in September or October.

Interestingly, the Moon Festival celebrates the ascent of Chang E into heaven after she took the pill of immoratlity and landed on the moon where she now lives with the Jade Rabbit (who either makes the elixir of immortality if you are Chinese or just makes mochi if you are Japanese).  The Moon Festival is celebrated on the 15th day of the 8th month (according to the traditional Chinese calendar).
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#12
They're good, I used to eat them in college around that time of year (I'm not sure if they're available year round, I only saw them around that time of year).

Pretty danged sweet, I've only had the yolk centered ones.

Pretty rich IMO.
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#13
(01-30-2010, 12:49 AM)Han Wrote: Interestingly, the Moon Festival celebrates the ascent of Chang E into heaven after she took the pill of immoratlity and landed on the moon where she now lives with the Jade Rabbit (who either makes the elixir of immortality if you are Chinese or just makes mochi if you are Japanese).  The Moon Festival is celebrated on the 15th day of the 8th month (according to the traditional Chinese calendar).

Fascinating! I love mythology and have read many books of Greek, Roman, and Irish myths. Strangely, I've never looked into Asian mythology...I really should!
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#14
Ooooh well we eats them last night, when the moon was big and round, btw...

They we're, well, just okayish. I wouldn't say they were as good as I'd hoped. Great name, though.. And interesting story behind them, thanks Han.

While at the Chinese market, I also picked up some "happy mouth" little sweet fried cracker balls with sesame seeds on them.  And also some other various sweet treats for my little sweeties here at home.  :)

And I picked up two big huge bags of mussels which we ate late night, I cooked them in dry white wine and drizzled melted butter over them. Yum.

I bought some pears and some leeks and a durian. Has anyone ever eaten a durian before? It looks just like a porcupine. As big as a porcupine, too. I've no earthly idea what to do with the thing.  :shrug:

I also bought some various little dough wrapped things. I think they're sort of like dim sung? We'll see. We'll eat that tonight, I spose.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#15
(01-30-2010, 02:35 PM)Jacafamala Wrote: Ooooh well we eats them last night, when the moon was big and round, btw...

They we're, well, just okayish. I wouldn't say they were as good as I'd hoped. Great name, though.. And interesting story behind them, thanks Han.

While at the Chinese market, I also picked up some "happy mouth" little sweet fried cracker balls with sesame seeds on them.  And also some other various sweet treats for my little sweeties here at home.  :)

And I picked up two big huge bags of mussels which we ate late night, I cooked them in dry white wine and drizzled melted butter over them. Yum.

I bought some pears and some leeks and a durian. Has anyone ever eaten a durian before? It looks just like a porcupine. As big as a porcupine, too. I've no earthly idea what to do with the thing.  :shrug:

I also bought some various little dough wrapped things. I think they're sort of like dim sung? We'll see. We'll eat that tonight, I spose.
:laughing:

Sorry, it's just funny you're description of things.

You eat durian just like any fruit, I mean, the inside.

They smell funky, but are delicious.

What's inside the dough wrapped things? Meat? Red colored pork? Could be 'cha siu bao' (I only know the cantonese). Anyhoo...

I liked the sesame cookies too :P Haven't had 'em in awhile tho.
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#16
(01-30-2010, 06:29 PM)Iuvenalis Wrote:
(01-30-2010, 02:35 PM)Jacafamala Wrote: Ooooh well we eats them last night, when the moon was big and round, btw...

They we're, well, just okayish. I wouldn't say they were as good as I'd hoped. Great name, though.. And interesting story behind them, thanks Han.

While at the Chinese market, I also picked up some "happy mouth" little sweet fried cracker balls with sesame seeds on them.  And also some other various sweet treats for my little sweeties here at home.  :)

And I picked up two big huge bags of mussels which we ate late night, I cooked them in dry white wine and drizzled melted butter over them. Yum.

I bought some pears and some leeks and a durian. Has anyone ever eaten a durian before? It looks just like a porcupine. As big as a porcupine, too. I've no earthly idea what to do with the thing.  :shrug:

I also bought some various little dough wrapped things. I think they're sort of like dim sung? We'll see. We'll eat that tonight, I spose.
:laughing:

Sorry, it's just funny you're description of things.

You eat durian just like any fruit, I mean, the inside.

They smell funky, but are delicious.

What's inside the dough wrapped things? Meat? Red colored pork? Could be 'cha siu bao' (I only know the cantonese). Anyhoo...

I liked the sesame cookies too :P Haven't had 'em in awhile tho.
Well, it looks like we have some mushroom and rice "baskets" and some little spinach wrapped "shepherd's purses... Plus I've got some white bean and mushroom soup, sauteed bok choy and Italian meatballs. I'm waiting until my son and my husband come home to eat all this stuff.

Have you ever had thousand year old eggs? I used to eat those a thousand years ago--during my school days. Seriously, I should've bought some of those, too. Next time.  :)
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#17
Jacafamala Wrote:Have you ever had thousand year old eggs? I used to eat those a thousand years ago--during my school days. Seriously, I should've bought some of those, too. Next time.

So you ate 'em back when they were just regular fresh eggs?  :P
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#18
Jelly Belly now has Mooncake flavored jelly beans. Some kind person should send a bag to ILoveChineseMoonCakes.

[Image: 2k17692dmuintlmooncaket.jpg]

FAIRFIELD, CALIF., — New from Jelly Belly Candy Company, the maker of The Original Gourmet Jelly Bean since 1976, comes a bold new flavour targeted to regional tastes. The new Jelly Belly bean flavour of Mooncake is being unveiled at ISM for global distribution.

This sweet treat is inspired by the ceremonial pastry enjoyed during celebrations of Mid-Autumn Festival across Asian cultures.

The new Jelly Belly bean is dairy-free, gelatine-free, gluten-free and certified OU Kosher by the Orthodox Union. The flavour will be available in a 25g tin and in bulk. 

Jelly Belly Candy Company is celebrating 112 years of candy making this year.  The family-operated business is known worldwide for fine confections and innovative product development. Jelly Belly jelly beans took the world by storm with their dramatic tasting jelly beans in 1976 when they became the favourite of President Ronald Reagan and were the first jelly beans in outer space.

Additional information is available from Jelly Belly International Division, by logging on to www.JellyBelly.com, emailing international.sales@jellybelly.com, or by visiting the Jelly Belly booth at ISM, located in the USA Pavilion, Hall 10.2, Booth F-71.


http://jellybellypress.com/?p=443
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