There's no remission of sin outside the Church
#1
We believe in her firmly and we confess with simplicity that outside of her there is neither salvation nor the remission of sins, as the Spouse in the Canticles (Sgs 6:8) proclaims: "One is my dove, my perfect one. - Unam sanctam

Would this mean that those who are outside the Church can not get their sin remitted? Not even via perfect contrition?
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#2
Mostly true.  However, baptisms performed outside the Church are valid.  I guess it is considered a "Catholic" baptism, however.  So let's say some 30 year old atheist goes to a Methodist church and gets baptized.  His sins would be forgiven.  If he died right after, he would go to heaven.
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#3
An infidel steal $1,000 from his neighbor.

He's an infidel. He has not been baptized (water, blood, desire). He is outside the Church.

Can his mortal sin (ie. stealing) be forgiven?
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#4
The judgment belongs to God, not to us.  Any speculation, that we are the only ones who regularly goes to heaven is dangerous, usurping the judgmental power of Jesus Christ.

The contrition is perfect, if it is sincere, and one does not sins any more. Without the strong will not to sin any more neither the confession remits the sins.If someone has a girlfriend and sexual connection with her, that persons confession is valid only if before that he breaks up the relationship.  If someone hates his/her neighbor (e.g. an NO priests) and goes to confession w/o first recocile with him, the confession is worthless. We are not in better position than a protestant or Muslim. God gave us more, but he requires more in response.
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#5
That's a true statement. One must be united to the Body of Christ to draw life from it.

It is through Baptism that we are born again into the Body of Christ,. In regards to perfect contrition, it necessitates a love of God above all things--that love of God above all things necessitates faith. In certain cases, this love and faith may suffice where Baptism is lacking through no fault of the unbaptized. In such cases, the person would not be completely cut off from the Church and may have their sins remitted.
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#6
(02-02-2010, 09:47 AM)glgas Wrote: Without the strong will not to sin any more neither the confession remits the sins.If someone has a girlfriend and sexual connection with her, that persons confession is valid only if before that he breaks up the relationship.  If someone hates his/her neighbor (e.g. an NO priests) and goes to confession w/o first recocile with him, the confession is worthless. We are not in better position than a protestant or Muslim. God gave us more, but he requires more in response.

I was with you up until this.  Firstly, why would someone cut off a relationship, romantic or otherwise, if it lead to sin?  I could certainly understand varying circumstances, but a couple falling into sin is unfortunately quite normal due to the great depths that we have fallen into in our current society.  I have no idea why this would mean that the couple should split.  If they have other issues then I could see the splitting, but if they are simply two good Catholics who have trouble with chastity then they should marry, definitely not split.

Secondly, I agree that we cannot say who God will or will not forgive.  Certainly it seems that He forgives those outside of the Church even if only because of their ignorance.  That being said, the grace given through the Church and Her sacraments is what God intended for all men.  It is the ideal situation for the growth and movement of our soul toward God.  More may be demanded of us, but it is certainly easier for us because God's grace flows through the Church.  To be a Catholic is a blessing, not an extra burden or a curse.  Ignorance is not bliss.
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#7
Quote: An infidel steal $1,000 from his neighbor.

He's an infidel. He has not been baptized (water, blood, desire). He is outside the Church.

Can his mortal sin (ie. stealing) be forgiven?

If he is outside the Church, he is not forgiven.  Put it this way.  Suppose a Catholic does the same thing.  Even going to Mass avails him nothing, he must go to confession.  If he is impeded, then an act of contrition will suffice UNTIL he can get to confession.  The infidel doesn't even have confession.
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#8
Quote: We are not in better position than a protestant or Muslim.
This is where the Novus Ordo drags you down to.  It is the devil's way of eliminating baptism and the Mass.

Fr. Feeney saw it.  It led to a neo-Pelagianism.  Which led to the "dignity of Man".  Which led to Vatican II.  Which led to the loss of most TLMs.  which led to the SSPX being "excommunicated" (which was void).  And now the conclusion.  Anyone (all?) can be saved outside the Church.  Baptism is not needed.  The sacraments are not needed.  Only Catholics go to hell.  The devil's goal is revealed.

Our Lady of Fatima, pray for us.
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#9
(02-02-2010, 10:36 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote: That's a true statement. One must be united to the Body of Christ to draw life from it.

It is through Baptism that we are born again into the Body of Christ,. In regards to perfect contrition, it necessitates a love of God above all things--that love of God above all things necessitates faith. In certain cases, this love and faith may suffice where Baptism is lacking through no fault of the unbaptized. In such cases, the person would not be completely cut off from the Church and may have their sins remitted.

So, You're saying that it is not true that outside of the Church there is no remission of sin?

And how is someone who is not baptized "not be completely cut off from the Church?"
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#10
OK, well here's my question on this topic: can someone who is not Catholic validly receive the sacrament of  Confession?

The Church permits even a laicized priest to validly absolve a penitent in cases of need.  In another example, any layperson can in case of need validly baptize any person.

So - and I agree it's a pretty hypothetical situation - what if some non-Catholic found himself in peril (sinking ship maybe?) and sought out a priest for forgiveness of his sins....can the priest do it?  Obviously, he could follow the form of the sacrament - but is it valid?

Or - would the priest need to baptize the person first, and then absolve them? Extra ecclesiam nulla salus would seem to indicate so.
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