New missal not here yet, but Catholics urged to start talking about it
#1
Kind of ironic how cautious they are being to "Catholic sensitivity" (i.e., liberals) with this, yet they threw the Novus Ordo upon the Church with unprecedented speed and destruction.


From CNS

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories...000560.htm

New missal not here yet, but Catholics urged to start talking about it

By Nancy Frazier O'Brien
Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- The new English translation of the Roman Missal might not be in U.S. parishes for as long as two years, but Father Rick Hilgartner hopes Catholics are talking about it now.

Mention of the upcoming changes in the prayers at Mass might come in the occasional bulletin insert, in adult religious education classes or Bible study groups or in a homily at Mass, said the associate director of the U.S. bishops' Secretariat of Divine Worship in Washington.

"Anything to heighten people's awareness," Father Hilgartner added in a Feb. 2 interview with Catholic News Service.

Along with such organizations as the Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions and the National Association of Pastoral Musicians, the divine worship secretariat is gearing up to help educate the nation's 68 million Catholics on changes to the language of the Mass that were initiated in 2002 when Pope John Paul II issued a new edition of the Roman Missal in Latin.

The last time a new edition of the missal was implemented was in 1975.

For nearly a decade, representatives of bishops' conferences in 11 English-speaking countries, including the U.S., have been working on the English translation of the 2002 missal, which each conference has approved in sections over the years.

A news release issued at the Vatican in late January said the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments is in the final stages of reviewing the last sections of the translation before issuing its "recognitio," or approval.

Once the Vatican approval is received, the president of each bishops' conference will decide when the new missal will start being used in each country.

But before that can happen, priests and people must be involved in a "two-tiered catechetical process" that starts with "general and broad" discussions of such issues as the "nature of the Mass, how it builds up the church and how we encounter Christ," Father Hilgartner said.

"Some people want to jump right to conversations about the texts" themselves, without the proper context and background, he added.

But some of the liturgical texts that have been translated date to the fourth century and "were not crafted in the 21st-century American sound-bite culture" that communicates in "short, simple statements," Father Hilgartner said.

He said those who have criticized the new liturgical language as out of touch with today's Catholics are not taking the context into proper account.

"The way I might send a text message to a friend is not the way I'd speak in a job interview," Father Hilgartner said. "And the way we speak in prayer ought to communicate a sense of reverence."

Some critics have regarded the new translations from the original Latin as "slavishly literal" and "elitist and remote from everyday speech and frequently not understandable." One critic recently said that the translation's use of words such as "ineffable," "consubstantial," "incarnate," "inviolate," "oblation" and "ignominy" are not understandable to the average Catholic.

Beginning in April and continuing through November, Father Hilgartner and Msgr. Anthony Sherman, executive director of the divine worship secretariat, will be traveling around the country for 11 each of the 22 scheduled workshops on implementation of the Roman Missal. The Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions and the National Organization for Continuing Education of Roman Catholic Clergy are co-sponsoring the two-day sessions.

Designed for priests and diocesan leaders such as clergy personnel administrators, members of liturgical commissions and diocesan music directors who will play key roles in implementing the missal, the workshops will provide an overview of the new texts, demonstration and practice of the chants of the missal, discussion of the "art of celebrating" the Mass and discussion of leading a community through change.

For those unable to attend the workshops, the federation is offering a video "workshop-in-a-box" that can be used in small groups and a set of audio recordings to help celebrants listen to and speak the prayers aloud to become more familiar with their construction and cadence.

Further information and resources are available at a Web site launched by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, www.usccb.org/romanmissal.

U.S. publishers are gearing up to offer other resources, such as the World Library Publications' recently announced "Prepare and Pray" recordings of the new eucharistic prayers, as read by Bishop J. Peter Sartain of Joliet, Ill.

"I imagine that priests will find it useful and time-saving to play the CDs in their cars while traveling, or even downloading them to their MP3 players to listen while exercising, walking and taking time in prayer," said Jerry Galipeau, associate publisher of World Library Publications.

The National Association of Pastoral Musicians also is hosting Webinars and preparing audio and video recordings of the priests' chants in the new missal.

In addition, an international group of priests and scholars called the Leeds Group -- for Bishop Arthur Roche of Leeds, England, longtime chairman of the International Commission on English in the Liturgy -- is developing a multimedia resource called "Become One Body, One Spirit in Christ." The package will include more than 80 hours of video, including expert interviews and scenes of Mass from New York to Auckland, New Zealand.

Also in the works at the USCCB is a parish implementation kit that will outline when and how parishes should take each step toward implementation of the missal, such as preparing the music and worship aids for the congregation.

That timeline will be established after an implementation date is announced for the new missal, Father Hilgartner said.
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#2
(02-09-2010, 08:04 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Some critics have regarded the new translations from the original Latin as "slavishly literal" and "elitist and remote from everyday speech and frequently not understandable." One critic recently said that the translation's use of words such as "ineffable," "consubstantial," "incarnate," "inviolate," "oblation" and "ignominy" are not understandable to the average Catholic.

What, we're idiots?

And I can believe that this will take "two years or more"......but if the US Bishops agreed with it, you'd have that missal in your pew already.
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#3
(02-09-2010, 08:04 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Some critics have regarded the new translations from the original Latin as "slavishly literal" and "elitist and remote from everyday speech and frequently not understandable." One critic recently said that the translation's use of words such as "ineffable," "consubstantial," "incarnate," "inviolate," "oblation" and "ignominy" are not understandable to the average Catholic.

These are all perfectly valid English words and can be found in any decent dictionary.  The distress over the vocabulary speaks says much about the pitiful state of the literacy of the general public.  Thank you government run schools for that.  Perhaps we should try to include words lire "Home Boy", "Dog" and the ubiquitous "Dude".

It really won't make much difference, as one of the major problems with the NO is that the limited rubrics are ignored and the text is ad-libbed.  Just changing the missal will not insure compliance.  Unless something is done to crack down on the abuses, this is an exercise in futility.

In any event, I would expect the USCCB to find a way to delay the whole process until about 2095.


In any event, I would expect the USCCB to find a way to dely the whole process until about 2095.
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#4
:laughing:  What a slap in the face that us "average" idiot laymen who can't understand words like "ineffable" and "incarnate."  These bishops are pompous bums. 
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#5
(02-09-2010, 08:04 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Kind of ironic how cautious they are being to "Catholic sensitivity" (i.e., liberals) with this, yet they threw the Novus Ordo upon the Church with unprecedented speed and destruction.
Well, maybe somebody's learning from past mistakes? Give the happy-clappy crowd some time to warm to the idea, and maybe they won't form the Society of Paul VI in reaction.
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#6
(02-09-2010, 10:36 PM)SoCalLocal Wrote:
(02-09-2010, 08:04 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Kind of ironic how cautious they are being to "Catholic sensitivity" (i.e., liberals) with this, yet they threw the Novus Ordo upon the Church with unprecedented speed and destruction.
Well, maybe somebody's learning from past mistakes? Give the happy-clappy crowd some time to warm to the idea, and maybe they won't form the Society of Paul VI in reaction.
I'm with SoCal on this one.  Remember that you're dealing with a generation who, by and large, has known nothing but the NO Mass.  Hopefully, the gradual approach will bear decent fruit.

As for the "archaic translation," maybe now catchesis will actually be run by people who understand it...
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#7
Quote: the translation's use of words such as "ineffable," "consubstantial," "incarnate," "inviolate," "oblation" and "ignominy" are not understandable to the average Catholic.

This is the reason why the parish bulletin should initiate talk about it, and make them familiar words to everyone. Any word becomes familiar (even the ral stupid abbreviations) if you read/hear it many times. 
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#8
(02-09-2010, 09:28 PM)Walty Wrote: :laughing:  What a slap in the face that us "average" idiot laymen who can't understand words like "ineffable" and "incarnate."  These bishops are pompous bums. 

That comes from living in mansions wearing scarlet and gold and being driven around in a limo and Brown nosing every liberal cause out there. It puts you above the plebians.
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#9
(02-09-2010, 08:04 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Kind of ironic how cautious they are being to "Catholic sensitivity" (i.e., liberals) with this, yet they threw the Novus Ordo upon the Church with unprecedented speed and destruction.

According to Helen Hull Hitchcock (my hero, http://www.adoremus.org/  ) the bishops don't want a replay of what happened when the Mass underwent its first change right after Vatican II. This is how Mrs. Hitchcock explained it on Fr. Mitch Pacwa's show "EWTN LIVE" the other night. While nowhere near as catastrophic a change that pulled the rug out from under us in 1965, it will be a big change for English speaking Catholics-under-40 who have only known the N.O. with the translation we've had since 1975. It would be wrong to hurry again. The waiting period is a cushion.

If you have 54 minutes to spare, click on the following link and scroll down to #17, click on the sound icon for "EWTN LIVE - Helen Hull Hitchcock on the New Translation of the Roman Missal 2/3/2010" and listen to the whole show. This is what they're talking about in mainstream Catholicism today. Getting the English to correspond with the traditional Latin is an important step in improving the liturgy and it will affect the whole Church - therefore it will affect traditionalists.

http://podcast.mbirgin.com/302/ewtnaudio...#divPlayer
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#10
(02-09-2010, 11:17 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: therefore it will affect traditionalists.

How will it affect trads. Last time I was at an SSPX Mass someone brought the new Missal up to Fr. and he said something like " its still an invalid Mass in most cases making it sound pretty wont matter much to us since we use a completely different missal anyway". So my question is how will it affect trads since they do use a completely different missal. Right now(due to some traveling issues) I am stuck in the NO land of oz so a new translation would help but how can reforming one missal change what goes on with the Mass of the Saints?
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