Is divine simplicity a dogma of the Catholic faith?
#1
Or is one permitted to hold an opinion contrary thereto?

If it is a dogma, where was it defined?
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#2
I have stumbled upon the answer: it was defined at the Fourth Council of the Lateran as well as at Vatican I.
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#3
(02-16-2010, 08:29 AM)veritatem_dilexisti Wrote: Or is one permitted to hold an opinion contrary thereto?

If it is a dogma, where was it defined?

The divine simplicity is truth which can be understand by the natural mind. An entity composite from parts could not be Absolutum. It is not something based on supernatural revelation.

I did not found any definition as dogma for the divine simplicity, I would appreciate any proper  quote from popes or councils.
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#4
(02-16-2010, 09:18 AM)glgas Wrote:
(02-16-2010, 08:29 AM)veritatem_dilexisti Wrote: Or is one permitted to hold an opinion contrary thereto?

If it is a dogma, where was it defined?

The divine simplicity is truth which can be understand by the natural mind. An entity composite from parts could not be Absolutum. It is not something based on supernatural revelation.

Its Protestant opponents (Alvin Plantinga, William Lane Craig …) actually consider it incoherent. That "it is not something based on supernatural revelation" — ie, that it is "un-Biblical" — is further cause for their concern.

(02-16-2010, 09:18 AM)glgas Wrote: I did not found any definition as dogma for the divine simplicity, I would appreciate any proper  quote from popes or councils.

"We firmly believe and openly confess that there is only one true God, eternal and immense, omnipotent, unchangeable, incomprehensible, and ineffable, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost; three Persons indeed but one essense, substance, or nature absolutely simple …" — Fourth Council of the Lateran, 1215

"[God] is one, singular, completely simple …" — Vatican I, chapter 1, § 2, 1870
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#5
Here’s what Dr. Ott says in his Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma:

“Since there exists in God no potency, and since for matter potentiality is essential, there can therefore be no matter in God…

"Speculatively, the absolute simplicity of God may be derived from His pure actuality.  Pure Act is incompatible with any kind of composition, for the composed thing comes later than the composing parts and is dependent on these.  Further, a composed thing presupposes an origin, which brings the parts together and thus the parts are in potency to the whole.  The existence of virtual differences between the essence and the attributes of God and between the attributes themselves does not controvert the absolute simplicity of God, because the individual attributes do not designate parts of the Divine Essence, but the whole Divine Essence, although from different points of view.”
(pg. 31-32) – Albert Cipriani
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#6
It's a language thing. How do you say it properly, in any language? It's just one of those things in theology that will probably never find perfect expression through words. There's a place for that kind of thing - endless attempts at explaining some concept that heaven just smiles at.
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