Beer on day of fasting
#11
I wouldn't. I try to avoid something I enjoy that much. I don't drink coffee either because I enjoy that a lot as well. The cravings for my several-times daily coffee and my "beer-thirty" and not following through are reminders of what I'm supposed to be doing: pennance.


Anything you're pretty attached to, I'd think pretty hard about ingesting it on a fast day. Fasting from food on a fast day is not a diet, it's to help you reflect on attachment, and if you merely indulge in something else you're attached to, you may miss the point...depending on magnitude of the attachment.

It's a judgment call, but I'd try to err on the side of 'caution' (kinda bad term here) and just not. It's only one day a week.
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#12
(02-18-2010, 04:03 AM)Iuvenalis Wrote: It's only one day a week.

Well, the traditional Latin Rite fast is 40 days and partial abstinence on days when there isn't full abstinence (Sundays excepted).  If you're Eastern Rite, it's more brutal.

The 1983 code is pretty easy.  Only fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday, abstinence on Fridays.  If one is following the 1983 code, they may want to give up whatever they are for all 40 days otherwise there's not too much difference between Lent and the regular year where one is expected to do some penance every Friday replacing the year-round abstinence.

(Here's a reference for anyone reading and wants to know the difference):

http://www.fisheaters.com/fasting.html
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#13
(02-17-2010, 11:58 PM)Walty Wrote: The monks would drink only beer throughout all 40 days?  Man.  That sounds like a good idea.

If it's homemade beer, it is a good idea.  It's full of yeast, calories, etc., that provides nourishment for manual labor.  But those monks worked and didn't develop a beer gut.  Many of us would just get fatter because we sit all day.

Half a cheese sandwich and nothing else until dinner won't keep a farm going.  We're supposed to fast according to our nutritional needs.  So if you're in the fields with a scythe all day and brew your own, bottoms up.  Otherwise water and black coffee to wash down half a sandwich is probably enough for most of us.
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#14
Does anyone have a good beer recipe?

About the Eastern rite fasting: I know they go vegan during Lent. Do they also eat only one full meal a day all days of Lent?
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#15
(02-18-2010, 04:46 AM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: If it's homemade beer, it is a good idea.  It's full of yeast, calories, etc., that provides nourishment for manual labor.  But those monks worked and didn't develop a beer gut.  Many of us would just get fatter because we sit all day.

I second that one!  I'll have to brew some up sometime during Lent... LOL
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#16
(02-18-2010, 09:32 AM)Satori Wrote: Does anyone have a good beer recipe?
I have several.  PM me what styles you like and I'll hook you up.
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#17
If one studies history, you'll see that beer, ale and the like are very popular for drinking. This was for health purposes; water was highly polluted and dangerous. This is why you rarely see anyone drinking pure water in history in cities. Remember when Jesus was given vinegar during the crucifixion? It sounds weird to us now, but that was actually the standard drink for the Roman army (et al). It was called posca.

So, keep that in mind when following examples. If those monks had fresh clean water available, I think they'd drink that instead.

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#18
(02-18-2010, 12:38 PM)Herr_Mannelig Wrote: So, keep that in mind when following examples. If those monks had fresh clean water available, I think they'd drink that instead.
Maybe, maybe not.  After all, alcohol also provides calories. 

Here's what St. Benedict had to say about wine:

"#40.  Each one has his own gift from God, the one in this way, the other in that. Therefore it is with some hesitation that the amount of daily sustenance for others is fixed by us. Nevertheless, in view of the weakness of the infirm we believe that a hemina [just less than half a liter] of wine a day is enough for each one. Those moreover to whom God gives the ability of bearing abstinence shall know that they will have their own reward. But the prior shall judge if either the needs of the place, or labour or the heat of summer, requires more; considering in all things lest satiety or drunkenness creep in. Indeed we read that wine is not suitable for monks at all. But because, in our day, it is not possible to persuade the monks of this, let us agree at least as to the fact that we should not drink till we are sated, but sparingly..."
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#19
(02-18-2010, 09:32 AM)Satori Wrote: Does anyone have a good beer recipe?

About the Eastern rite fasting: I know they go vegan during Lent. Do they also eat only one full meal a day all days of Lent?

If they follow the traditional fast, especially for the Russians united to Rome, it is much worse.

Quote:There is no distinction between fast and abstinence; the fast essentially bears on the quality of the food and not the quantity. These rules are for all the Byzantine rites but it should be noted that the Russian rite is much more severe with other stricter prescriptions and nine different degrees of fasting.In villages and monasteries the ancient custom remains in vigour whereby it is forbidden to eat before Vespers. All must fast from seven years of age.

1. Great Lent
48 days. Forbidden are: Food cooked with fat, fish, oil, eggs, milk products wine. Oil is permitted on Saturday, Sunday. Fish is permitted on the feast of the Annunciation and Palm Sunday

Russians add:
All Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays (& Wednesdsay of Holy Week) the food may only be cold and dry;
Good Friday nothing may be eaten.

They also do a lot more fasting throughout the year.
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#20
If I had all those rules, I think I'd just eat dry bread and some hairy carrots to keep regular. Easier than having to think about it.

You will note that Russians are not noted for excellent cuisine, whereas Greeks and Catholic countries are.
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