Try to avoid smoking
#21
(03-01-2010, 01:18 AM)LoveJLove Wrote: Thanks Addy for the encouragement.  But I just can't lay off the cigarrete.  I went three days and went back today because I am a total addict.  I am a junkie! I went outside to look to see if there were any cigarrette butts out there and found one but it was too small so had to go and buy some.



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#22
(03-01-2010, 01:18 AM)LoveJLove Wrote: Thanks Addy for the encouragement.  But I just can't lay off the cigarrete.  I went three days and went back today because I am a total addict.  I am a junkie! I went outside to look to see if there were any cigarrette butts out there and found one but it was too small so had to go and buy some.

You're addicted to nicotine, not cigarettes. You don't need the tar and all the carcinogens. I've been trying to quit nicotine since I got hooked 10+ years ago, and haven't been able to do it. I started using electronic "cigarettes" a while ago and they work. Haven't had a cigarette in a long time. You might want to choose this route if your will is too weak to quit nicotine entirely. I spend about $30 a month on e-cig supplies, which is considerably cheaper than buying cigarettes and isn't that much more expensive than rolling your own.
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#23
(02-26-2010, 12:52 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: 2 weeks is just long enough to be cocky about quitting.  Let us know how you're doing at 3 months.  Statistically speaking, the time for regression to smoking occurs between 2 and 3 months after quitting.

Yeah he's not out of the woods quite yet. The longest period I ever went without nicotine was 3 months, and then I gave in.
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#24
Thanks Stv I would like some more info and would appreciate if you send me a PM thank you.
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#25
(02-26-2010, 01:28 PM)CanadianCatholic Wrote: LOL we're all gonna die of cancer...its just a matter of which one. Ill prbably die of lung cancer, I started smoking when I was 12, im sure after 13 years Ive done plenty of damage.

How did you start smoking at 12 :/
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#26
Well... the twelve year olds in the school are work at are all in the middle of puberty, relatively cranky, and wanting to be teenagers. Throw them in a lousy situation and they could develop all kinds of problems with cigs, alcohol, etc. Especially older teens are involved. Unfortunate, but not unthinkable.....
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#27
(03-07-2010, 05:20 AM)stvincentferrer Wrote: You're addicted to nicotine, not cigarettes. You don't need the tar and all the carcinogens.

Does nicotine also have harmful effects on the body? I'm just curious, because I've never really read much of anything about isolated nicotine.
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#28
(03-11-2010, 04:51 AM)Servus_Maria Wrote:
(02-26-2010, 01:28 PM)CanadianCatholic Wrote: LOL we're all gonna die of cancer...its just a matter of which one. Ill prbably die of lung cancer, I started smoking when I was 12, im sure after 13 years Ive done plenty of damage.

How did you start smoking at 12 :/
I would get my older brothers and sisters (who all smoked) to buy me cigarettes. I started drinking when I was 12 too...I mwas kind of a messed up kid.
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#29
:smokin:
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#30
(03-11-2010, 02:33 PM)Tinuviel Wrote:
(03-07-2010, 05:20 AM)stvincentferrer Wrote: You're addicted to nicotine, not cigarettes. You don't need the tar and all the carcinogens.

Does nicotine also have harmful effects on the body? I'm just curious, because I've never really read much of anything about isolated nicotine.

I'm not that knowledgeable about health issues related to nicotine. Wikipedia has information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicotine

Warning: nicotine seriously improves health

Robin McKie, science editor
Sunday 18 July 2004
The Observer

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/s...45,00.html

Nicotine could soon be rehabilitated as a treatment for schizophrenia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as hyperactivity disorders.

Research shows that the chemical that has addicted millions to smoking has a powerful impact on brain activity in patients who suffer from psychiatric and degenerative disorders.

Some experiments have shown that nicotine can slow down the onset of Parkinson's symptoms; others have had revealed its power in curtailing the hallucinations of schizophrenics.

'A whole range of psychiatric conditions seem to be helped by nicotine,' said Dr Dan McGehee, a neurobiologist at the University of Chicago. 'However, such benefits do not justify smoking. The lethal effects of cigarettes far outweigh any help they provide. On the other hand, our research does suggest that derivatives of nicotine, administered medically, could help to alleviate a range of psychiatric problems.'

Nicotine is known to switch on receptors on the surface of cells in certain parts of the brain, causing these neurones to release the neuro-transmitter dopamine, a chemical that is associated with feelings of pleasure. This effect leads to a person's addiction.

More than 50 per cent of people suffering from clinical depression smoke, while the figure rises to 95 per cent for schizophrenics. But smoking among the general public has dropped to about 25 per cent. 'The assumption is that people with psychiatric conditions are self-medicating,' said McGehee. 'They are smoking because the nicotine in particularly helpful in alleviating their condition.'

This point is backed by Dr Tony George, of Yale University. 'Smoking is a marker for psychopathology,' he states in the current issue of the journal Nature Medicine.

Similarly, it has been found that nicotine can sometimes slow the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's, a disease caused by the slow destruction of certain types of brain cells.

'Either nicotine stimulates other types of brain cells to compensate for the loss of the cells involved in Parkinson's, or it is somehow providing protection to remaining healthy Parkinson's cells,' said McGehee. 'Either way, the effect is noticeable.'

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