Greetings from Sweden
#41
(03-14-2010, 03:30 PM)Texican Wrote: Dead giveaways.  The jumping back and forth between Norwegian and Svenska is making my head spin, though.

They are almost similar. I have no problem at all understanding Norwegian. At least not written language. And it seems that my Norwegian friend has no problem with Swedish.

Do you understand anything at all of Scandinavian languages?
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#42
(03-14-2010, 05:34 PM)Engelbrecht Wrote: Do you understand anything at all of Scandinavian languages?

That's telling him :)

I know basic grammar and can recognise Swedish and understand it a bit (I'm learning), I can recognise and know some words which are common in Germanic languages. I can recognise Danish and Icelandic and understand a little Icelandic, based on my study of Old Norse and Anglo-Saxon (although, I've not actually encountered Icelandic that much). If I spoke Swedish better, I don't think the switching would give me a headache, at least, not as much as reading DK's english...
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#43
(03-14-2010, 05:39 PM)Herr_Mannelig Wrote: That's telling him :)

In a way, yes. I guess it is.

(03-14-2010, 05:39 PM)Herr_Mannelig Wrote: I know basic grammar and can recognise Swedish and understand it a bit (I'm learning), I can recognise and know some words which are common in Germanic languages. I can recognise Danish and Icelandic and understand a little Icelandic, based on my study of Old Norse and Anglo-Saxon (although, I've not actually encountered Icelandic that much). If I spoke Swedish better, I don't think the switching would give me a headache, at least, not as much as reading DK's english...

Just a question from a novice - what exactly is meant by DK's english? Am I just a little slow?
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#44
(03-14-2010, 07:13 PM)Engelbrecht Wrote: Just a question from a novice - what exactly is meant by DK's english? Am I just a little slow?

devotedknuckles, a member here, who types on a tiny Blackberry keyboard has posts which have interesting English. He also uses a specific dialect of English usually, and can be difficult to read, even for me.

You'll see his posts around.

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#45
(03-14-2010, 04:37 PM)Herr_Mannelig Wrote: You can tell the difference or are you using some translation service?

I still remember a few words, but when I read the Norsk, it's just different enough to make me wonder if my eyes aren't playing tricks on me.
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#46
(03-14-2010, 05:34 PM)Engelbrecht Wrote: They are almost similar. I have no problem at all understanding Norwegian. At least not written language. And it seems that my Norwegian friend has no problem with Swedish.

Do you understand anything at all of Scandinavian languages?

Only enough to get me in trouble, I suppose.
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#47
(03-17-2010, 12:53 AM)Texican Wrote: I still remember a few words, but when I read the Norsk, it's just different enough to make me wonder if my eyes aren't playing tricks on me.

Can you read fuþark at all?

I like it. If English were pure (darn those Normans!), I'd definitely recommend it over the Latin alphabet.
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#48
(03-17-2010, 10:41 AM)Herr_Mannelig Wrote:
(03-17-2010, 12:53 AM)Texican Wrote: I still remember a few words, but when I read the Norsk, it's just different enough to make me wonder if my eyes aren't playing tricks on me.

Can you read fuþark at all?

I like it. If English were pure (darn those Normans!), I'd definitely recommend it over the Latin alphabet.

It was said to me that English is heavily influnced by ancient Scandinavian. I always figured it was the other way around. Do you linguists have anything to say regarding that?
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#49
(03-17-2010, 05:28 PM)Engelbrecht Wrote: It was said to me that English is heavily influnced by ancient Scandinavian. I always figured it was the other way around. Do you linguists have anything to say regarding that?

Anglo-Saxon came from many Germanic languages. The Angles, Saxons,  Frisians and Jutes are considered to be the ones who started it all, so the languages are from them (however, many more tribes likely were a part of it). The Jutes were from Denmark, but that was before Scandinavians lived there (in England, it was Celtic before the Anglo-Saxons came).

The languages were closely related, regardless of specifics. I've studied Anglo-Saxon (which is a broad statement. I've studied several dialects to some degree though), and more briefly studied Old Norse. They were more similar than Swedish, German and English are now.

There was, in the the the 8th, 9th and 10th centuries many raids into England from the Norsemen. They established some settlements and had a rather limited, but significant, impact on the language.

For example, our "they" and "are" are directly from Old Norse (not sure if you ever thought of "vara" like that, but you can see how similar it is). Many common words in English are of Old Norse origin too because of this. This was when Old English was used. By the time of the Norman invasion (which starts Middle English), the Vikings were no longer influential in England. 

Old Norse and Old English are similar in many ways, so the influence isn't that noticeable unless there is a break in an English pattern.

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#50
Welcome from Italy!! I hope you can find your way to Catholicism (the traditional one, of course)! ;)
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