Day of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor
#1
Day of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor, by Robert B. Stinnett

FDR and Pearl Harbor
J.R. Nyquist
07.10.01

http://web.archive.org/web/2001122216091...yquist.htm

In a remarkable attempt to invert our understanding of history, Robert B. Stinnett has written a book arguing that Japan's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor was no surprise at all. No surprise, that is, for President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The book's title is "Day of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor."

The basic outline of Stinnett's thesis is not new. What he offers, however, are previously unknown details to support the notion that FDR intentionally provoked the Japanese and then, knowing that war was sure to follow, allowed Pearl Harbor to become the main target -- purposely setting the U.S. battleships out as bait, clearing a path for Japan's carriers across the North Pacific.

According to Stinnett's research, Lieutenant Commander Arthur H. McCollum, head of the Far East desk of the Office of Naval Intelligence, came up with an eight-point plan in October, 1940, for getting the United States into World War II. Stinnett calls this "FDR's back door to war."

For those readers unfamiliar with the strategic position of the United States in 1940, things were not coming up roses. In August 1939 Nazi Germany had joined with Soviet Russia to attack and partition Poland. The Soviets also attacked and invaded Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania and Finland. France and Britain, having guaranteed Poland's security, declared war on Hitler but not Stalin.

In the first several months of 1940 Hitler invaded and captured, in order, Denmark, Norway, Holland, Belgium and France. He did this so quickly, and so decisively, that Britain's defeat by the Nazis was a distinct possibility. What would have happened if Hitler had gotten his paws on the British fleet?

In 1940 the Far East situation had also deteriorated. The Japanese had previously taken Korea and Manchuria. In 1937 the Imperial Army invaded China and captured the country's key economic zones, inflicting many defeats on the Chinese. With the fall of France to Hitler, all of French Indochina lay open to Japanese aggression. The position of Dutch Indonesia -- with its vast oil supplies -- was in turn made vulnerable by Japanese advances into Indochina.

To make matters worse, Italy had declared war on Britain in 1940, threatening the Mediterranean Sea lanes and North Africa. Given the solidarity of the dictatorships, their hostility to free society, the fall of Britain, China and the Dutch East Indies would have left America alone and isolated in a world controled by militaristic powers -- with the hub of Western democracy shattered.

It was in this context that Arthur McCollum presented his five page memorandum in October, 1940, which advised the following moves: 1) Arrange to use British naval facilities in the Pacific; 2) Arrange to use facilities and supplies in the Dutch East Indies; 3) Give all possible aid to China in its resistance to Japanese aggression; 4) Send a division of heavy cruisers to the Far East; 5) Send two divisions of submarines to the Far East; 6) Keep the main U.S. fleet in Hawaii; 7) Insist that the Dutch refuse to grant Japanese demands for oil; 8 ) Completely embargo all trade with Japan, in collaboration with the British.

Stinnett says McCollum's memo became the basis of Roosevelt's grand strategy. This is shown, says Stinnett, by "a series of secret presidential routing logs plus collateral intelligence information in Navy files" which prove that Roosevelt saw the McCollum eight-action plan and approved it.

"Throughout 1941," wrote Stinnett, "provoking Japan into an overt act of war was the principal policy that guided FDR's actions toward Japan." And Stinnett's documentation is persuasive.

Perhaps the most shocking of Roosevelt's actions was the deployment of American cruisers and submarines to the Far East, adjacent to Japan's vital shipping lanes. But in strategic terms, the significant discovery was Stinnett's documentation of how Roosevelt conspired to clear the Northern Pacific of American ships and planes to shield the advance of the Japanese Navy against detection. Had the Japanese been detected, they might have withdrawn their carrier strike force and refused to start a conflict without the advantage of surprise.

In 1986 I had the opportunity to ask President Roosevelt's son, James Roosevelt, about the strategy the U.S. government had followed in 1941. James had worked on his father's staff at the time, and openly admitted that Japan was provoked intentionally with the embargo (Japan had almost no other sources of oil).

"Why did your father provoke Japan with the blockade," I asked, "when all Japan had to do was attack Britian and the Dutch East Indies, leaving our forces alone?"

James Roosevelt smiled faintly and replied, "We were confident how they would react."

This answer puzzled me at the time, but after reading Stinnett's book the answer falls neatly into place. The Japanese militarists were fools who did not understand America's isolationist character. President Roosevelt's intelligence officers, on the U.S. side, had intercepted all of Japan's vital communications. If the Japanese did not understand us, we certainly understood them. Japan's codes had been broken. The White House was reading the Imperial mind, anticipating every Japanese move.

Japan's intelligence failure was fatal to her miltiary ambition. If Stinnett is right, the United States led Japan into a trap which also caught up Hitler and Mussolini, destroying the Axis completely. All that was left of the dictatorships was Stalin, who had fallen out with Hitler in 1941 and ended up joining the Allies.

Was Roosevelt an evil man for the way he conducted U.S. foreign policy in 1941?

I doubt that a Jew, whose parents died at Auschwitz, would say so. I doubt that the suffering Chinese would say so. And from Roosevelts action America emerged to be the world's leading power, providing a stable basis for peace and development across the planet.

Do the ends justify the means?

This is something Americans will have to think about.

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#2
intentionally provoked the japanese lol
sure like prior to fdr they were just a wee nation of peacefull asians and had no march nor pretext to empire
ok
come on. surely u can see how bias this article is. how does one provoke a nation which had just began to buld its empire? the japanese of that time certainly didn't hide the fact. and were very proud at defeating the Russians in 1905. years before wwii. the Japanese were as sure as war as the Americans. it was only a matter of time. whether fdr provoked them or not the japs would of attacked they could of not strategically speaking aloud themselves to be contained. the biggest blunder was picking the wrong side. if they would of not signed with the axis asia would be very different today
imperial japan had allot of plms. and the only way for it to sustain itself economically and resource wise was to expand and take those resources. from of course mainland Asia ie china and Korea or other Asian island nations. ie Philippines. u name it. imperial japan was an interesting place. it had a very interesting anarchist resistance movement as well, which is almost unknown in the west and japan and was termed pure anarchism by its founders. the leaders of which were executed for a botched assassination attempt on the emperor. anyhooo that's another thread. America is no saint but imperial japan certainly isn't either. and indeed japan and the world is better off now then if imperial japan would of won which of course was never a military possibility even which the generals of the imperial Japanese forces accepted. fascinating wee people. whats even more tragic is a once proud tough honorable warrior nation has been reengineered to be a bunch of weird effete perverts.
so i take back what i said and though the world is better of having the imperial Japanese defeated the Japanese are not. lol

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#3
(03-22-2010, 09:21 AM)stvincentferrer Wrote: Day of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor, by Robert B. Stinnett

FDR and Pearl Harbor
J.R. Nyquist
07.10.01

http://web.archive.org/web/2001122216091...yquist.htm

In a remarkable attempt to invert our understanding of history, Robert B. Stinnett has written a book arguing that Japan's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor was no surprise at all. No surprise, that is, for President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The book's title is "Day of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor."


Do the conspiracy theorists on this board ever get tired of justifying their own views, its getting a little tired.
The basic outline of Stinnett's thesis is not new. What he offers, however, are previously unknown details to support the notion that FDR intentionally provoked the Japanese and then, knowing that war was sure to follow, allowed Pearl Harbor to become the main target -- purposely setting the U.S. battleships out as bait, clearing a path for Japan's carriers across the North Pacific.

According to Stinnett's research, Lieutenant Commander Arthur H. McCollum, head of the Far East desk of the Office of Naval Intelligence, came up with an eight-point plan in October, 1940, for getting the United States into World War II. Stinnett calls this "FDR's back door to war."

For those readers unfamiliar with the strategic position of the United States in 1940, things were not coming up roses. In August 1939 Nazi Germany had joined with Soviet Russia to attack and partition Poland. The Soviets also attacked and invaded Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania and Finland. France and Britain, having guaranteed Poland's security, declared war on Hitler but not Stalin.

In the first several months of 1940 Hitler invaded and captured, in order, Denmark, Norway, Holland, Belgium and France. He did this so quickly, and so decisively, that Britain's defeat by the Nazis was a distinct possibility. What would have happened if Hitler had gotten his paws on the British fleet?

In 1940 the Far East situation had also deteriorated. The Japanese had previously taken Korea and Manchuria. In 1937 the Imperial Army invaded China and captured the country's key economic zones, inflicting many defeats on the Chinese. With the fall of France to Hitler, all of French Indochina lay open to Japanese aggression. The position of Dutch Indonesia -- with its vast oil supplies -- was in turn made vulnerable by Japanese advances into Indochina.

To make matters worse, Italy had declared war on Britain in 1940, threatening the Mediterranean Sea lanes and North Africa. Given the solidarity of the dictatorships, their hostility to free society, the fall of Britain, China and the Dutch East Indies would have left America alone and isolated in a world controled by militaristic powers -- with the hub of Western democracy shattered.

It was in this context that Arthur McCollum presented his five page memorandum in October, 1940, which advised the following moves: 1) Arrange to use British naval facilities in the Pacific; 2) Arrange to use facilities and supplies in the Dutch East Indies; 3) Give all possible aid to China in its resistance to Japanese aggression; 4) Send a division of heavy cruisers to the Far East; 5) Send two divisions of submarines to the Far East; 6) Keep the main U.S. fleet in Hawaii; 7) Insist that the Dutch refuse to grant Japanese demands for oil; 8 ) Completely embargo all trade with Japan, in collaboration with the British.

Stinnett says McCollum's memo became the basis of Roosevelt's grand strategy. This is shown, says Stinnett, by "a series of secret presidential routing logs plus collateral intelligence information in Navy files" which prove that Roosevelt saw the McCollum eight-action plan and approved it.

"Throughout 1941," wrote Stinnett, "provoking Japan into an overt act of war was the principal policy that guided FDR's actions toward Japan." And Stinnett's documentation is persuasive.

Perhaps the most shocking of Roosevelt's actions was the deployment of American cruisers and submarines to the Far East, adjacent to Japan's vital shipping lanes. But in strategic terms, the significant discovery was Stinnett's documentation of how Roosevelt conspired to clear the Northern Pacific of American ships and planes to shield the advance of the Japanese Navy against detection. Had the Japanese been detected, they might have withdrawn their carrier strike force and refused to start a conflict without the advantage of surprise.

In 1986 I had the opportunity to ask President Roosevelt's son, James Roosevelt, about the strategy the U.S. government had followed in 1941. James had worked on his father's staff at the time, and openly admitted that Japan was provoked intentionally with the embargo (Japan had almost no other sources of oil).

"Why did your father provoke Japan with the blockade," I asked, "when all Japan had to do was attack Britian and the Dutch East Indies, leaving our forces alone?"

James Roosevelt smiled faintly and replied, "We were confident how they would react."

This answer puzzled me at the time, but after reading Stinnett's book the answer falls neatly into place. The Japanese militarists were fools who did not understand America's isolationist character. President Roosevelt's intelligence officers, on the U.S. side, had intercepted all of Japan's vital communications. If the Japanese did not understand us, we certainly understood them. Japan's codes had been broken. The White House was reading the Imperial mind, anticipating every Japanese move.

Japan's intelligence failure was fatal to her miltiary ambition. If Stinnett is right, the United States led Japan into a trap which also caught up Hitler and Mussolini, destroying the Axis completely. All that was left of the dictatorships was Stalin, who had fallen out with Hitler in 1941 and ended up joining the Allies.

Was Roosevelt an evil man for the way he conducted U.S. foreign policy in 1941?

I doubt that a Jew, whose parents died at Auschwitz, would say so. I doubt that the suffering Chinese would say so. And from Roosevelts action America emerged to be the world's leading power, providing a stable basis for peace and development across the planet.

Do the ends justify the means?

This is something Americans will have to think about.
Reply
#4
According to the author of Imperial Cruise, it was his cousin Teddy Roosevelt who encouraged the Japanese to become an Imperialist power like the USA was trying to become, and we'd split the world east and west. I haven't read it but saw him on Imus. His book is better researched than the rest about T.R., and many historians are ticked off over this book. So, for me a natural contrarian I figure he is right and what we have been told is myth and fable, especially because he was a Progressive.
tim
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#5
well encouraging some nation to go for it is well just that. any serious student of Japanese history will tell you they needed no encouragement. what they needed was know how. the Japanese were very bitter and resentful at the west America particularly having forced them to open when perry showed up and challenged the last shogun, this was a spark on a tinderbox which of course resulted in a massive social upheaval leading to the shuguns  overthrow and restoration  of the emperor as  the sole ruler in 1868. emperor Mieji  set about to create japan as a military world power. forming the military along western lines with western aid. in everything from military to the constitution to cuisine to even scotch. Japanese scotch is vile stuff rare but vile. the Japanese were a warrior people and the fusion of shinto and buddhism in state shinto made them even more so. when the japanese started to fight and win both against the Chinese with the west during the boxer rebellion then against the Russians which emboldened them, it was a march towards empire. the Americans love to believe that they have the power to say to a nation become an empire and then all the sudden it does. but reality doesn't work like that.
the imperial Japanese viewed themselves very much so as an Asian restoration of Asian power within Asia. they tried to really foster this idea on its colonies. in short the war with the west was inevitable as soon as emperor mieji gained the throne in 1868 and vowed never to have his nation embarrassed such as happened with perry and the west again
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#6
DK, with what you already know you'd be the right guy to read the book critically. If it were a history of the advance of machine tools in the twentieth century that would be me. LOL
tim
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#7
Interesting as always DK, but you're missing the point.
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#8
the point is what. the japs wouldn't of attacked if the Americans didn't tell them too?
this doesn't hold taking their imperial history prior to the attack into account
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#9
"The basic outline of Stinnett's thesis is not new. What he offers, however, are previously unknown details to support the notion that FDR intentionally provoked the Japanese and then, knowing that war was sure to follow, allowed Pearl Harbor to become the main target -- purposely setting the U.S. battleships out as bait, clearing a path for Japan's carriers across the North Pacific."

The reviewer could have added "purposely setting the U.S. battleships and 3,000 American citiziens out as bait . . ."

It would have been nice of FDR to let Admiral Kimmel, who was the commander of the Pacific Fleet at that time, know that Pearl Harbor was likely to be attacked. FDR never allowed this information to get to Kimmel.

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#10
nations sacrifice their sons. its not right. if this is true its just another point in how nations divorced from CHRIST operate. i keep seeing a parallel in conspiracy theories. first point is
its always the American govs fault. either they allowed it or they placed the bait or they did it themselves. maybe so.
but what about the imperial Japanese fleet? have they any responsibility in the attack? yes indeed they should of been met in the pacific. but i don't think at that time America would of come out the better, no on that day. if you wan the to agree that fdr was won gin sacrificing Americans to the japs i agree. but i don't think if he didn't no war would of happened. it was coming. and the world is better off having the imperial Japanese defeated. Asia is anyway. Koreans certainly think so. probably the Philippines too. and of course the Japanese themselves
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