Let's talk about Windswept House...
#71
Does anyone think it's eerily prophetic the way Fr. Aldo Carnesecca dies? Like Fr. Martin, he falls down the stairs.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
Reply
#72
(04-10-2010, 08:34 AM)Jacafamala Wrote:
(04-10-2010, 06:31 AM)Augstine Baker Wrote:
(04-09-2010, 06:31 PM)Gerard Wrote:
(04-09-2010, 10:57 AM)Larry Wrote: Fr. Martin believed in an "underground Church" that could provide the traditional forms of the sacraments to those who could not receive them otherwise. As such, he supported many diverse groups that had the traditional sacraments, even though that didn't mean he was in agreement on every point. He supported the SSPX, the SSPV, the Thuc line bishops, and the mainstream groups like the FSSP and the Institute of Christ the King. His participation in that ordination doesn't necessarily imply his agreement with every belief that this group held, just that they were providing traditional sacraments to faithful who would otherwise not be able to receive them.

In one of his early interviews with Benard Janzen, Fr. Martin talked abou the infighting among traditionalist Catholics.  He said, you've got the Pius X fighting with the Pius V on one side and on the other the Pius X is fighting with the followers of Fr. Feeney and then individual snipers and marksmen taking potshot everywhere.  He'd hoped for a united front, but Bishop Williamson rightly pointed out another time that it is perfectly natural for trads to fight one another when the Pope is not doing his job. 

One of the tactics employed by Reds is to isolate your oppositionn and discredit them by the fact that they are beneath contempt.  It is a global strategy which filters down to the  most basic levels of small groups within a social setting like a school, a church, public meeting or any gathernig. This is how they've dealt with the Underground Church in China, and this is how they deal with people on the lower level.

i've often thought that what happened to the Church in the sixties and seventies couldn't have happened if we'd had the internet. People could've organized better, they could have banded together according to areas to maintain the Latin Mass.

Your last statement is true.  However, your are looking at it in hindsight.  You had to be there.  What did we know?  We trusted the Church.  And who, other than the liberals,  knew anything about "organizing" (which is how they took control of everything)?

I agree, too, that had we the internet in the sixties, the Church wouldn't be the way it is today.  They would never have gotten away with anything.
Reply
#73
(05-31-2010, 02:57 PM)Lavalliere Wrote: Your last statement is true.  However, your are looking at it in hindsight.  You had to be there.  What did we know?  We trusted the Church.  And who, other than the liberals,  knew anything about "organizing" (which is how they took control of everything)?

I agree, too, that had we the internet in the sixties, the Church wouldn't be the way it is today.  They would never have gotten away with anything.

Who knew to read encyclicals prior to the Internet?  People didn't even read Humanea Vitae when that came out.  It was "filtered" and people were at the mercy of the honesty of the clergy and the religious media. 

Had the internet been around when Pius XII released Humani Generis, it would have shaken the Church and the world.  And Vatican II would not have gone the way it did. The Catholic Faithful would have been up in arms watching a bunch of betrayers do exactly what Pius XII warned against.
Reply
#74
(05-31-2010, 02:57 PM)Lavalliere Wrote:
(04-10-2010, 08:34 AM)Jacafamala Wrote:
(04-10-2010, 06:31 AM)Augstine Baker Wrote:
(04-09-2010, 06:31 PM)Gerard Wrote:
(04-09-2010, 10:57 AM)Larry Wrote: Fr. Martin believed in an "underground Church" that could provide the traditional forms of the sacraments to those who could not receive them otherwise. As such, he supported many diverse groups that had the traditional sacraments, even though that didn't mean he was in agreement on every point. He supported the SSPX, the SSPV, the Thuc line bishops, and the mainstream groups like the FSSP and the Institute of Christ the King. His participation in that ordination doesn't necessarily imply his agreement with every belief that this group held, just that they were providing traditional sacraments to faithful who would otherwise not be able to receive them.

In one of his early interviews with Benard Janzen, Fr. Martin talked abou the infighting among traditionalist Catholics.  He said, you've got the Pius X fighting with the Pius V on one side and on the other the Pius X is fighting with the followers of Fr. Feeney and then individual snipers and marksmen taking potshot everywhere.  He'd hoped for a united front, but Bishop Williamson rightly pointed out another time that it is perfectly natural for trads to fight one another when the Pope is not doing his job. 

One of the tactics employed by Reds is to isolate your oppositionn and discredit them by the fact that they are beneath contempt.  It is a global strategy which filters down to the  most basic levels of small groups within a social setting like a school, a church, public meeting or any gathernig. This is how they've dealt with the Underground Church in China, and this is how they deal with people on the lower level.

i've often thought that what happened to the Church in the sixties and seventies couldn't have happened if we'd had the internet. People could've organized better, they could have banded together according to areas to maintain the Latin Mass.

Your last statement is true.  However, your are looking at it in hindsight.  You had to be there.  What did we know?  We trusted the Church.  And who, other than the liberals,  knew anything about "organizing" (which is how they took control of everything)?

I agree, too, that had we the internet in the sixties, the Church wouldn't be the way it is today.  They would never have gotten away with anything.

Except that we had Liberals in the Church, people knew about them and resisted them.  This was true in Europe as it was in the United States.  Father Mueller was treated in much the same way as Father Feeney during the Boston Heresy Case.  And many people didn't just mildly dislike people like Newman or Isaak Hecker, they hated them and with good reason, inmho.
Reply
#75
Who read encyclicals in the sixties? Well some of us did. I was around in the sixties and let me tell you encyclicals were easily available for 50 cents in Catholic book stores, even many parishes had them in the literature racks here in the Washington archdiocese. One of the big problems with implementing Vatican II was media distortion in the early 60's. I once went back and spent several days poring over media coverage of Vatican II in Time and Life during the Council sessions, the issues that were published from 1962-65. It was interesting to me how much they distorted the actual meanings of documents. Dignitatis Humanae for example was cited as something that would allow Catholics to dissent from Church teaching. In fact it says just the opposite. I think lots of pastors and teaching sisters read Time and Life and thought they were reading Vatican II. God only knows how much damage that did. And I'm sure it was the periti who were feeding the media the distortions.

C.
Reply
#76
Overall, I think the book is a really great read. I'm almost finished. It's taken me forever. But not because it wasn't exciting or interesting enough. I tend to be a rather slow reader.

One critique--a minor one: so far, the character Paul Gladstone just doesn't strike me as being very believable.  First he leaves the seminary because of all the liberal changes and innovations. Then the next thing you know he's married a non-Catholic, and has become a Mason. His parish priest is a sham. Did I miss something? How did he change his ideas about things so? I don't think Martin did enough to explain such a drastic change in him.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
Reply
#77
(05-31-2010, 04:05 PM)Cetil Wrote: Who read encyclicals in the sixties? Well some of us did. I was around in the sixties and let me tell you encyclicals were easily available for 50 cents in Catholic book stores, even many parishes had them in the literature racks here in the Washington archdiocese. One of the big problems with implementing Vatican II was media distortion in the early 60's. I once went back and spent several days poring over media coverage of Vatican II in Time and Life during the Council sessions, the issues that were published from 1962-65. It was interesting to me how much they distorted the actual meanings of documents. Dignitatis Humanae for example was cited as something that would allow Catholics to dissent from Church teaching. In fact it says just the opposite. I think lots of pastors and teaching sisters read Time and Life and thought they were reading Vatican II. God only knows how much damage that did. And I'm sure it was the periti who were feeding the media the distortions.

C.

It's amazing how much it seems that the enemy struck at just the right time, you know? Just at the right point in history. Any earlier or later and it might not have worked out so well for him.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
Reply
#78
(03-27-2010, 08:24 AM)Satori Wrote: I will read this novel if there's a copy at my public library, or at the local theological seminary's library. *Goes to the websites to check*

Okay, we're on.

Today may 31st, there are 24 copies available on abebooks.com ranging from $8.72 to $315.00 (!!!).
I got one last week at $ 7.65 not including postage fees to France.
Reply
#79
(04-09-2010, 04:48 PM)crusaderfortruth3372 Wrote: I got done reading Windswept House about a year ago, but the following has been bothering me for many months now....
Perhaps we will never know the full truth whether Cardinal Bernardin was a Satanist during his years down in South Carolina serving with Bishop Russell...  Most of us already know that Fr. Martin had said that he loosely based these Satanic events with Agnes and the dog as actually occurring. Perhaps not in 1957 like the article states, but in 1963 as Fr. Martin alludes to in his book? Or did Fr. Martin make up the year and the events to protect the victims involved?? I'm probably 80% certain that Bernardin was a homosexual, but I'm just not convinced he participated in this Satanic Ritual...Anyone know more??

http://www.arcticbeacon.com/greg/?p=36
In "The rite of sodomy" Bernardin is depicted as bisexual, "sail and steam" , like we are joking in French.
Reply
#80
(05-31-2010, 04:25 PM)Jacafamala Wrote:
(05-31-2010, 04:05 PM)Cetil Wrote: Who read encyclicals in the sixties? Well some of us did. I was around in the sixties and let me tell you encyclicals were easily available for 50 cents in Catholic book stores, even many parishes had them in the literature racks here in the Washington archdiocese. One of the big problems with implementing Vatican II was media distortion in the early 60's. I once went back and spent several days poring over media coverage of Vatican II in Time and Life during the Council sessions, the issues that were published from 1962-65. It was interesting to me how much they distorted the actual meanings of documents. Dignitatis Humanae for example was cited as something that would allow Catholics to dissent from Church teaching. In fact it says just the opposite. I think lots of pastors and teaching sisters read Time and Life and thought they were reading Vatican II. God only knows how much damage that did. And I'm sure it was the periti who were feeding the media the distortions.

C.

It's amazing how much it seems that the enemy struck at just the right time, you know? Just at the right point in history. Any earlier or later and it might not have worked out so well for him.

Don't worry. I think the Virgin will smite the whole mess just when all seems lost. Then we will have a sudden and glorious Restoration and the reign of the Immaculate Heart.

C.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)