Triduum Questions
#1
OK, I am a dummy,  somebody educate me.....

At Holy Thursday Mass, instead of a bell at the consecration, the sacristan used this wooden clapper thingamabob.

And at the Good Friday service, when the Blessed Sacrament was brought in from the altar of repose, again with the thingamabob preceding the priest and clopping all the way.

What is that?

And another question - I have always at Good Friday services seen a plain wooden cross venerated.  At my new parish, they use a crucifix, with the parishioners kissing the corpus.  What do the rubrics call for?
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#2
Quote:At Holy Thursday Mass, instead of a bell at the consecration, the sacristan used this wooden clapper thingamabob.

After the Gloria of Maundy Thursday, the organ and all other festive instruments (such as bells) are supposed to go silent. The wooden clapper, called a crotalus, is a more "penitential" replacement. It might help to remember that before the little Sanctus bells were invented, the tower bells were used exclusively. Some churches still use the tower bells in addition to the little ones.

Quote:And at the Good Friday service, when the Blessed Sacrament was brought in from the altar of repose, again with the thingamabob preceding the priest and clopping all the way.

I have honestly not seen that.

Quote:And another question - I have always at Good Friday services seen a plain wooden cross venerated.  At my new parish, they use a crucifix, with the parishioners kissing the corpus.  What do the rubrics call for?

I don't think it matters. My church uses a gold reliquary that doesn't have a corpus, but has a (purported) relic of the True Cross embedded.
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#3
Quote:What do the rubrics call for?

There are no rubrics for the congregation in the old books.
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#4
(04-05-2010, 08:19 PM)Credo Wrote:
Quote:What do the rubrics call for?

There are no rubrics for the congregation in the old books.

I think he was asking about what kind of cross the rubrics say ought to be used. As far as I know, it doesn't matter.

Though you're right that as far as the congregation goes, there aren't really any "rubrics" for anything. There are, at best, the guidelines that you'll see in the Liber Usualis.
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#5
The_Harlequin_King Wrote:I think he was asking about what kind of cross the rubrics say ought to be used.

I see.
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#6
[quote='The_Harlequin_King' pid='544853' dateline='1270511790']
Quote:At Holy Thursday Mass, instead of a bell at the consecration, the sacristan used this wooden clapper thingamabob.

After the Gloria of Maundy Thursday, the organ and all other festive instruments (such as bells) are supposed to go silent. The wooden clapper, called a crotalus, is a more "penitential" replacement. It might help to remember that before the little Sanctus bells were invented, the tower bells were used exclusively. Some churches still use the tower bells in addition to the little ones.

king...... you should be studying Canon Law....my brother is, and with your knowledge you would be a blessing in the Vatican.....
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#7
(04-05-2010, 09:14 PM)Matthew Wrote: king...... you should be studying Canon Law....

Ha, I personally find canon law boring as heck; but if I change my mind, there's a canon law/Catholic rights foundation where I live in San Antonio, and I'm an acquaintance of one of the lawyers there.

I do like the study of liturgical practices, rubrics and ceremony, but I think the churches I'm involved with think of me more as as the resident..... eccentric than real sacristan material.
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#8
(04-05-2010, 09:21 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(04-05-2010, 09:14 PM)Matthew Wrote: king...... you should be studying Canon Law....

Ha, I personally find canon law boring as heck; but if I change my mind, there's a canon law/Catholic rights foundation where I live in San Antonio, and I'm an acquaintance of one of the lawyers there.

I do like the study of liturgical practices, rubrics and ceremony, but I think the churches I'm involved with think of me more as as the resident..... eccentric than real sacristan material.

ahhhh.... my friend...... all the better.  You answers that I have seen to many a question posed have been outstanding!!  Strict Catholic Girl as well ;)
You are gifted my friend........ use it.
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#9
(04-05-2010, 07:35 PM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: And another question - I have always at Good Friday services seen a plain wooden cross venerated.  At my new parish, they use a crucifix, with the parishioners kissing the corpus.  What do the rubrics call for?

What is interesting is that when I was growing up, and as an altar server, pre VII, on Good Friday (Pius XII revisons of 1955, or so), in my parish a crucifix was always venerated.  The people would come and kneel at the altar rail, the priest(s) would stop at each person so they could kiss the corpus, the altar server would wipe where the corpus had been kissed with a cotton ball, disposed of into a bowl, then onto the next person.

In every parish I can think of or remember since VII, a large, plain, wooden cross has always been used.
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#10
i was always my impression that it was to be a crucifix unless a relic of the true cross was present.  fr. z seems to concur: http://wdtprs.com/blog/2009/03/quaeritur...-crucifix/
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