Saints that are not on the Calender
#1
is it alright to celebrate the feastdays of the saints who are no longer on the calender?


why were they taken off?


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#2
Good question. But what do you mean by "celebrate"?

If I take a day off of school because my patron saint is Saint Cuthbert (for example; he isn't really) and that saint isn't on the general calendar, I'm sure that's not sinning.

If I'm a priest and I celebrate a Mass for Saint Cuthbert, I could still justify my reason for doing so, despite it not being in the general calendar, by calling it a votive Mass or a Mass for my private intention, or something like that.
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#3
celebrate as in celebrating the divine office on the old feast day of the saint

or venerating or paying honor to the saint
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#4
This is on area where the Tridentine Mass can, I think, be effectively developed for current times.  Change up some of the feast days to remove lesser known saints to free up room for others.  
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#5
ketchum Wrote:is it alright to celebrate the feastdays of the saints who are no longer on the calender?

Sure.

Quote:why were they taken off?

Because the old kalendar [sic] was very cluttered. In order to allow for a real lectio continua in the Mass and Office, an idea quite popular after the Council, it would make little sense to have saints' celebrations constantly breaking up the flow of readings.

Speaking personally, a few years back I decided to celebrate every Optional Memorial in the Liturgia Horarum. Those familiar with the revised office know that late every summer there is an extensive series of sermons by S. Augustine on the priesthood. It goes on for two to three weeks and it's quite powerful. But because Credo celebrated every possible feast day on the kalendar that year, that whole set of sermons was screwed up. Live and learn. Whatever the case may be, that kind of stuff happened all the time using the '62 books (albeit, at least in the old Mass there isn't such an emphasis on a lectio continua).

Actually, the problem of saints' days taking over ferial days was such a big problem 100 years ago that Pius X had to chuck the whole Tridentine breviary and start from scratch (an oft - perhaps conveniently - forgetten piece of liturgical history omitted by not a few traditionalists) .
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#6
(04-22-2010, 06:08 PM)Credo Wrote: Actually, the problem of saints' days taking over ferial days was such a big problem 100 years ago that Pius X had to chuck the whole Tridentine breviary and start from scratch (an oft - perhaps conveniently - forgetten piece of liturgical history omitted by not a few traditionalists) .

No matter the topic, you have to throw in digs at traditionalists, don't you?

Sigh.
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#7
(04-22-2010, 06:08 PM)Credo Wrote: Actually, the problem of saints' days taking over ferial days was such a big problem 100 years ago that Pius X had to chuck the whole Tridentine breviary and start from scratch (an oft - perhaps conveniently - forgetten piece of liturgical history omitted by not a few traditionalists) .

True, and a fascinating period of liturgical history.  And I've never seen traditionalists "omit" it.  What I have seen is people use it as a weapon against traditionalists and the traditionalist response is generally dismissive because they are generally very well aware of the history and are aware it is being misguidedly used as a weapon unfairly, and usually inaptly.  God bless Pope St. Pius X, a true reformer and an enemy of revolutionaries.
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#8
Yet more proof that Credo is a modernist.

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#9
sooo...is it alright for me to say the divine office for Saint Barbara ? because I always do it on my birthday (4th dec) and I celebreat her day as a solemnity
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#10
Ketchum - no, it's not alright. You'll go to Hell if you do!

Just kidding. St Philomena is not on the Calendar anymore and I know plenty of people who celebrate her feast day. 

For personal devotions, there is no sense in restraining yourself with imaginary rubrics.
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