On the Respect and Honor due to the Holy Father and detraction.
#1
For definitions on detraction, slander, and calumny see the end of this post.


68.3 Faithful obedience to the Vicar of Christ; making his teaching known. The sweet Christ on earth.


Along with showing him love and respect, we also pray for the one who takes Christ's place on earth. Love for the Roman Pontiff must be in us a beautiful passion, for in him we see Christ. Therefore we will not fall into the all too easy temptation of setting one Pope against another, having confidence only in those whose actions respond to our per­sonal feelings. We are not among those who nostalgically look back to a former Pope or look forward one in the future who will eventually dispense us from obeying the present one. Read the liturgical texts for the coronation of Pontiffs and you will notice that nowhere is there a reference to a conferral of powers proportionate to the dignity of the person elected by the conclave. Christ gives these powers directly to Peter's successor. Therefore in speaking of the Roman Pontiff we exclude from our vocabulary any expressions derived from parliamentary assemblies or the polemics of newspapers; let it not be said that people not of our faith should be the ones who explain the prestige of the head of Christendom in the world to others.



And there would be no true love and respect for the Pope without faithful internal and external obedience to his teaching and doctrine. Good children listen with pro­found respect to even the simplest advice of the common Father and try sincerely to put it into practice. In the Pope we should see somebody who is in Christ's place in the world - the sweet Christ on earth, as St Cath­erine of Siena used to say - loving and listening to him because his voice is the truth. We try to see that his words reach all the corners of the earth without distortion, so that, just as when Christ was on earth, many people disoriented by ignorance and error can discover the truth and many afflicted people recover their hope. It is part of the Christian's apostolic task to make the Pope's teaching known.



Jesus' very words can be applied to the Pope: He who abides in me ... he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing.  Without this union all fruit is only apparent and empty and, in many cases, brings bitter­ness and damages the whole Mystical Body of Christ.  On the other hand, if we are very united to the Pope, we will only have reasons for optimism in the task before us; this is reflected in these words of Mgr Escriva: Joyfully I bless you, son, for that faith in your mission as an apostle which inspired you to write: 'There's no doubt about it· the future is certain, perhaps in spite of us. But it is essential that we should be one with the Head - 'ut omnes unum sint: that all be one! - through prayer and sacrifice.



Fr. Francis Fernandez: In Conversation with Christ
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from the 40 Dreams of St. John Bosco


By turning their minds and hearts to St. Peter's Chair-the unshakable foundation of all God-given authority, the master key of all social order, the immutable charter of man's duties and rights, the divine light which unmasks the deception of evil passions, the faithful and powerful guardian of natural and Christian morality, the irrevocable guarantor of eternal ward and punishment. The Church, St. Peter's Chair and the Pope are one and the same thing. That is why Don Bosco wanted an all-out effort to make these truths accepted. His goals were to fully document the incalculable benefits brought by popes to civil society, to rebut all slanders hurled against them and to foster gratitude, loyalty and love for them.



This was Don Bosco's attitude. In his love of the Sover­eign Pontiff, he was truly great, both in word and in deed. He used to say that he could kiss each page of Salzano's Church History, because this Italian historian had clearly shown therein his love for the popes. To his clerics he gave a practical rule of thumb in appraising a book: "IF ITS AUTHOR IS SOMEWHAT UNFAVORABLE TO THE POPE, DON'T READ THE BOOK". 



When Don Bosco talks about the popes, he can go on forever. He always has new praises for them and speaks so charm­ingly as to inflame his listeners. He is at his best in two subjects: the virtue of purity and the papacy. He entrances and amazes everyone. To believe this, one must only read his works, especially his Lives of the Popes, which we consider required reading for anyone chosen by Providence to write the biography of this faithful servant of God."
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Is detraction a sin?  http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04757a.htm

detraction

1. The act of detracting or taking away.
2. A derogatory or damaging comment on a person's character or reputation; disparagement:
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slander :

words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
defame: charge falsely or with malicious intent; attack the good name and reputation of someone;
aspersion: an abusive attack on a person's character or good name
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calumny:

defamation: a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
aspersion: an abusive attack on a person's character or good name
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#2
I agree that speaking respectfully of popes is a good thing in itself.  I also think it a prudent thing.  One of most common negative stereotypes of traditional Catholics is that we are schismatic or rebellious in attitude.  Speaking of the papacy with love and respect helps to counter the stereotype.  It is to our advantage to express disagreements and doubts concerning popes in a respectful way.
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#3
Quote: Read the liturgical texts for the coronation of Pontiffs and you will notice that nowhere is there a reference to a conferral of powers proportionate to the dignity of the person elected by the conclave. Christ gives these powers directly to Peter's successor. Therefore in speaking of the Roman Pontiff we exclude from our vocabulary any expressions derived from parliamentary assemblies or the polemics of newspapers; let it not be said that people not of our faith should be the ones who explain the prestige of the head of Christendom in the world to others.

Since the coronation with the tiara that symbolizes the powers is gone, handed over to the UN by Paul VI, I guess this is non-applicable.    And if we want to dig into the V2 documents, most of the other things mentioned above have been handed off as well, especially in the name of "collegiality".

Part of tradition is the primacy of the papacy.  Traditional Catholics are for the restoration of the papacy to its rightful place which is why we get cranky when the Popes hand away that which is not theirs to give away: the authority and aspects of the throne of Peter that come from Christ.

The tiara and its authority belongs to him sitting in the throne of Peter, not the UN.    Not only is it not a Pope's to give away, it's a dereliction of duty not to accept that responsibility.

I wonder what these authors would think of the tiara going to the UN?
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#4
(04-25-2010, 04:53 PM)JayneK Wrote: I agree that speaking respectfully of popes is a good thing in itself.  I also think it a prudent thing.  One of most common negative stereotypes of traditional Catholics is that we are schismatic or rebellious in attitude.  Speaking of the papacy with love and respect helps to counter the stereotype.  It is to our advantage to express disagreements and doubts concerning popes in a respectful way.

Not if it means saying only "nice things".  We should say not nice things as long as they are truthful and done in a respectful manner.
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#5
(04-25-2010, 05:37 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote:
(04-25-2010, 04:53 PM)JayneK Wrote: I agree that speaking respectfully of popes is a good thing in itself.  I also think it a prudent thing.  One of most common negative stereotypes of traditional Catholics is that we are schismatic or rebellious in attitude.  Speaking of the papacy with love and respect helps to counter the stereotype.  It is to our advantage to express disagreements and doubts concerning popes in a respectful way.

Not if it means saying only "nice things".  We should say not nice things as long as they are truthful and done in a respectful manner.

People have legitimate concerns, disagreements and questions about teachings and actions of recent popes.  This gets us into the realm of "not nice."  As you say, this can, and should,  be done in a truthful and respectful manner.
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#6
(04-25-2010, 05:53 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(04-25-2010, 05:37 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote:
(04-25-2010, 04:53 PM)JayneK Wrote: I agree that speaking respectfully of popes is a good thing in itself.  I also think it a prudent thing.  One of most common negative stereotypes of traditional Catholics is that we are schismatic or rebellious in attitude.  Speaking of the papacy with love and respect helps to counter the stereotype.  It is to our advantage to express disagreements and doubts concerning popes in a respectful way.

Not if it means saying only "nice things".  We should say not nice things as long as they are truthful and done in a respectful manner.

People have legitimate concerns, disagreements and questions about teachings and actions of recent popes.  This gets us into the realm of "not nice."  As you say, this can, and should,  be done in a truthful and respectful manner.

Right, that's what I meant.  Not commentary on if someone has a big nose, etc.
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#7
Love and respect the Roman Pope! Pray for him! Be not a respecter of persons though, and study the life of Pope John XXII.
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#8

Novena for the Holy Father here:

http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...180.0.html

Join in!
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