Atkins - advice from those of you who have done it
#11
Sorry, I should have said, "in a day."
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#12
(05-02-2010, 01:21 AM)Robert De Brus Wrote: Well, I should have added - for a time I was a full on vegan (2002-2006 or so), so my protein was near zero.   I never touched beans or nuts really; avocados would be seen as exotic to me then.  My big problem now is that I am totally addicted to soda.  Its not uncommon for me to drink 200 ounces of it in a day sometimes.

I am a vegan. The real issue with it is avoiding all those technically vegan foods which are highly processed. When doing this Atkins diet, I recommend you do not count the contribution of fruits and vegetables in your totals, even if they are technically high in carbs.

The soda thing is probably the key...that is very bad for you in many ways. Have you tried to substitute something for it? If you like drinking flavoured liquids, maybe a juicer would be something you'd want. If you don't mind plain water (it may depend on where you are. In Scranton, the water was fine, but the water here is quite bad to taste), you could try something sweet but healthier, like grapes.

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#13
(05-02-2010, 01:28 AM)Herr_Mannelig Wrote:
(05-02-2010, 01:21 AM)Robert De Brus Wrote: Well, I should have added - for a time I was a full on vegan (2002-2006 or so), so my protein was near zero.   I never touched beans or nuts really; avocados would be seen as exotic to me then.  My big problem now is that I am totally addicted to soda.  Its not uncommon for me to drink 200 ounces of it in a day sometimes.

I am a vegan. The real issue with it is avoiding all those technically vegan foods which are highly processed. When doing this Atkins diet, I recommend you do not count the contribution of fruits and vegetables in your totals, even if they are technically high in carbs.

The soda thing is probably the key...that is very bad for you in many ways. Have you tried to substitute something for it? If you like drinking flavoured liquids, maybe a juicer would be something you'd want. If you don't mind plain water (it may depend on where you are. In Scranton, the water was fine, but the water here is quite bad to taste), you could try something sweet but healthier, like grapes.

Best I've found are the 'sparkling' flavored waters.  Diet sodas are too close and make me long for the real stuff.  I tried to quit a few years ago using diets, but then Pepsi stopped making my favorite substitute, Diet Vanilla Pepsi.

Yeah I know its disgusting.  Really its unbecoming of a grown man to be drinking that much junk.
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#14
(05-02-2010, 01:35 AM)Robert De Brus Wrote: Best I've found are the 'sparkling' flavored waters.  Diet sodas are too close and make me long for the real stuff.  I tried to quit a few years ago using diets, but then Pepsi stopped making my favorite substitute, Diet Vanilla Pepsi.

Yeah I know its disgusting.  Really its unbecoming of a grown man to be drinking that much junk.
Our bodies are designed to like such things. It is very criminal to have it so easily and widely available though. We are naturally attracted to high sugar or high fat foods and the "food" industry exploits this.

Be careful though...sugarless substitutes like that may not be good either as the body still thinks it is getting sugar, so in addition to hormone issues, it will confuse your system. That is why I recommend real sugar, but in a healthier way.
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#15
Robert, I'd recommend Dr. Diana Schwarzbein's books, especially the first one, The Schwarzbein Principle.  She destroyed her health and became overweight on a vegetarian diet high in refined sugars, so her story might sound familiar to you.  Her diet is low-carb compared to the grain-based diet the USDA recommends, but she insists that you not go too low either, making sure to eat enough vegetables and unrefined starches to keep your energy up.  A healthy body doesn't need any carbs, but a problem with low-carb for an unhealthy body is that it means getting your energy from protein and fats, both of which are more complicated to break down (which is one reason for the weight loss), and the unhealthy body may not be up to that task very well.  All the low-carb plans out there, including Atkins, actually recommend that you increase your carbs after the initial phase for precisely this reason, but people often feel so much better and start losing weight on the very-low-carb phase that they never move on to phase two, which is a mistake.

Dr. S's diet is based on the idea that people become overweight because their health is bad, and therefore you need to get healthy to lose weight, not lose weight to get healthy.  If you try to lose weight without addressing the underlying health problems, you may succeed for a while, but the weight will probably come back.  So it's a balanced diet of protein, healthy fats, green vegetables, and unrefined starches, with an emphasis on getting the highest quality real food you can.  I know she has vegetarian recommendations and even some additional books for vegetarians, though personally I'd suggest that you rethink that if you're at all open to it.  As someone whose family farms and who has killed a lot of animals myself, I have major problems with factory farming, but there are pastured alternatives if concerns about cruelty are your reason.

One problem you can run into with getting your protein from other sources is that some of those sources, like nuts, are very high in omega-6 fatty acids.  (Low-carbers also run into this when using nut flours as a replacement for grain.)  Nuts are packed full of nutrition, but like sugar, we're not designed to eat pounds of them at a time.  It's starting to look like excess omega-6s are one of the major causes of the modern "diseases of civilization," due to their inflammatory properties.  Thanks primarily to the advent of vegetable oils like corn, soy, and peanut oil, people eat tons more omega-6 than ever before. Omega-3s can combat them somewhat, but it's probably better just to keep omega-6 itself down as much as possible, especially when you're trying to recover from a diet high in processed foods.
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#16
(05-02-2010, 03:14 AM)Mhoram Wrote: Robert, I'd recommend Dr. Diana Schwarzbein's books, especially the first one, The Schwarzbein Principle.  She destroyed her health and became overweight on a vegetarian diet high in refined sugars, so her story might sound familiar to you.  Her diet is low-carb compared to the grain-based diet the USDA recommends, but she insists that you not go too low either, making sure to eat enough vegetables and unrefined starches to keep your energy up.  A healthy body doesn't need any carbs, but a problem with low-carb for an unhealthy body is that it means getting your energy from protein and fats, both of which are more complicated to break down (which is one reason for the weight loss), and the unhealthy body may not be up to that task very well.  All the low-carb plans out there, including Atkins, actually recommend that you increase your carbs after the initial phase for precisely this reason, but people often feel so much better and start losing weight on the very-low-carb phase that they never move on to phase two, which is a mistake.

Dr. S's diet is based on the idea that people become overweight because their health is bad, and therefore you need to get healthy to lose weight, not lose weight to get healthy.  If you try to lose weight without addressing the underlying health problems, you may succeed for a while, but the weight will probably come back.  So it's a balanced diet of protein, healthy fats, green vegetables, and unrefined starches, with an emphasis on getting the highest quality real food you can.  I know she has vegetarian recommendations and even some additional books for vegetarians, though personally I'd suggest that you rethink that if you're at all open to it.  As someone whose family farms and who has killed a lot of animals myself, I have major problems with factory farming, but there are pastured alternatives if concerns about cruelty are your reason.

One problem you can run into with getting your protein from other sources is that some of those sources, like nuts, are very high in omega-6 fatty acids.  (Low-carbers also run into this when using nut flours as a replacement for grain.)  Nuts are packed full of nutrition, but like sugar, we're not designed to eat pounds of them at a time.  It's starting to look like excess omega-6s are one of the major causes of the modern "diseases of civilization," due to their inflammatory properties.  Thanks primarily to the advent of vegetable oils like corn, soy, and peanut oil, people eat tons more omega-6 than ever before. Omega-3s can combat them somewhat, but it's probably better just to keep omega-6 itself down as much as possible, especially when you're trying to recover from a diet high in processed foods.

Well, in place of the meat for now I am going to fill it with soy products, like the faux-meats which I am already used to eating.  I did not become a vegetarian because of animal cruelity, but rather because I wanted to cut down on red meats.  I just found it easier to cut out all meats then just one type.  Looking back I think the whole thing was silly.  I had never been overweight until later that year - I was always about 160 pounds.  It wasnt until then that I started to put on weight, although I lost it in 2002 but I put it back on in 2006-7.  Odd it sounds, due to my first stint of being overweight, I became anorexic for several years and at one point got down to 116 pounds.  Then after several years of this I self destructed and ate alot. Im told this is common for men who become anorexics to 'flip' later and become overweight.  Now I feel like I 'could' keep it off as I am in a better mental state, and I dont want to be that thin again. 

I too enjoy hunting and killing animals (for sport in my case, especially raccoons with my M1 Carbine) so maybe I can go back to viewing some of them as food again.
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#17
You might also want to get in touch with a doctor. It sounds like you have enough issues to make possible severe health hazards possible. Having an educated third party to check with may prevent such problems.
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#18
Atkins is gimmicky and you will probably tire of it as most do.

My two cents:

Get a place in the country where you can raise most of your own food and know where it is coming from.

Eat whole grains only.

Grow your own  vegetables and fruits, and then can them.

If you like dairy, get miniature cows or goats.

Make sure  100% of the meat you consume is raised by you or hunted.

The poster formerly known as Rosarium is correct: Glycemic index is key.

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#19
(05-02-2010, 12:08 PM)matthew_talbot Wrote: Eat whole grains only.
Grains and milk are widespread, but they should only be used when necessary. They are not really ideal for humans. Also, "whole grain" products usually aren't. It is still degerminated flour and not the same as the flour which formed the diet of many civilisations. This sort of flour caused rickets and causes a lot of health problems to this day.

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#20
I've never dieted, but Mrs DS has, and Atkins is one of the things she's tried.  Since she runs the kitchen, when SHE'S on the Atkins, I'M on the Atkins.

I have to say that, other than missing pasta, it really wasn't too much of a hardship.  Meat at every meal was a bonus - having bacon, sausage, & ham in the house for breakfast was fantastic! 
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