Atkins - advice from those of you who have done it
#41
Quote:I started low-carbing at 290 pounds, lost to 220, then stopped and gained back to about 260, and started again and got to 240, where I seemed to plateau.  (And no, it wasn't all water weight.)  I made two mistakes: not following the actual diet by increasing my carbs as I went, and not dealing with the underlying issues that made me gain weight in the first place.  You see, people don't become obese because they eat too much; that's as silly as saying you can make your child an NBA player by feeding him twice as much.  The kid who grew four inches one summer ate like a horse because he was growing; and likewise, fat people eat more because they're getting fat.  In Good Calories, Bad Calories, Gary Taubes points out people who have a condition where one part of their body gets obese while another part wastes away, and he asks the obvious question: are they eating too much and making one part fat and eating too little and starving the other part?

You made some good points, but you also brought up some silly bullshit.  :laughing:  Of course people get overweight because they eat too much.  I guarantee that if I put you on the Japanese 600 calorie POW diet that you'll lose lots of weight regardless of your metabolism.  Remember, nobody ever died of hunger, they died of starvation.  The problem is that people don't have the will power to suffer some hunger when their body has already had an adequate amount of nutrition to survive. 
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#42
Quote: Losing and gaining water is very easy and fast and losing muscle is easier than losing fat
This makes no sense.  Fat is there to be used.  If you burn up glycogen, then your muscles will start sucking down blood glucose.  This will be replaced by drawing on fat stores.  Muscle is one of the last things to be used for energy.
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#43
(05-04-2010, 12:42 AM)James02 Wrote:
Quote: Losing and gaining water is very easy and fast and losing muscle is easier than losing fat
This makes no sense.  Fat is there to be used.  If you burn up glycogen, then your muscles will start sucking down blood glucose.  This will be replaced by drawing on fat stores.  Muscle is one of the last things to be used for energy.


It's true that most of the energy will be coming from fat stores (75% - 90%) but some tissues in the body still require glucose from the liver which requires the use of amino acids.  Those amino acids are taken from the protein in the body which are the muscles.  So if you starve yourself outright, you are losing muscle with the fat. 

So while is may not be easier to lose muscle than to lose fat (it's about equal) it is certainly harder from experience to gain muscle than to gain fat.
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#44
Yeah, the liver will supply glucose via glycogen stores.  But why should your body cannabilize muscle for amino acids, when you are flooding your blood stream with aminos via the Atkins diet?  And there is plenty of lipids to use for the energy source?

As far as gaining fat vs. muscle, absolutely correct.  It is very easy to gain fat.  Your body is set up for it.  But losing muscle mass is not something your body is set up to do, unless you are starving and have no fat stores.

And this is not a false dilemma.  Have some aerobic exercise, like an exercise bike, and also have some weight lifting.
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#45
(05-04-2010, 01:16 PM)James02 Wrote: Yeah, the liver will supply glucose via glycogen stores.  But why should your body cannabilize muscle for amino acids, when you are flooding your blood stream with aminos via the Atkins diet?  And there is plenty of lipids to use for the energy source?

As far as gaining fat vs. muscle, absolutely correct.  It is very easy to gain fat.  Your body is set up for it.  But losing muscle mass is not something your body is set up to do, unless you are starving and have no fat stores.

And this is not a false dilemma.  Have some aerobic exercise, like an exercise bike, and also have some weight lifting.

The big "secret" behind all these fad diets is simply maintaining enough protein in the body so you maintain muscle while restricting the calories from carbs and/or fats to lose the body fat.  It's all very simple. 

And frankly, most people should forget about dieting altogether and just focus on trying to put on 10-20lbs of lean muscle with strength training.  Focusing on this rather than losing bodyweight would solve most of their problems. 
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#46
(05-04-2010, 08:14 PM)PeterII Wrote: And frankly, most people should forget about dieting altogether and just focus on trying to put on 10-20lbs of lean muscle with strength training.  Focusing on this rather than losing bodyweight would solve most of their problems. 

Exactly. They don't even have to focus on how much weight; just their ability.

The ultimate weight loss plan: work to do 20 full pullups. A person who can do that is not overweight.
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#47
(05-03-2010, 02:15 PM)PeterII Wrote: I came up with my own revolutionary diet based on the laws of the Universe.  It's called the PeterII Eat more, Eat less diet.  If you're skinny, you should eat more.  If you're fat, you should eat less.  Magically, your body will change shape as a result.  If someone can turn that into a 200 page book and market it to the masses, I would be most appreciative.

Also, a good calorie free substitute for soda is soda water with lime in it. 

Cute Pete  :laughing:
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