School teachers a hundred times more likely to abuse children than priests
#11
I am going to be a High History Teacher; I am also discerning whether or not I am called to the Apostolic priesthood. Why does it seem that no matter the potential vocation I have: it is maligned so much whether by secular society. Or contrariwise: the teaching profession here as if juxtaposing teacher scandals next to priest scandals are a good thing in either case!?!---Not really.  It is rather quite frustrating.
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#12
My point in juxtaposing the scandals is to show the hypocrisy of the media.  I do not want to malign teachers.  My father was a teacher and I have many friends who are teachers.
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#13
I guess we need to allow women teachers and allow teachers to marry.

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#14
How providential. A local man has recently been berating Fr Laisney and Catholic priests in general via the local newspaper. These stats will provide a suitable foundation for a smug retort on my part!
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#15
The article and thread responses and statistics included in the responses here should be compiled into some kind of article for all Catholic teachers and parents to read.
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#16
(05-07-2010, 03:09 AM)Benno Wrote: The article and thread responses and statistics included in the responses here should be compiled into some kind of article for all Catholic teachers and parents to read.

Unfortunately those who want to malign Holy Mother Church will continue to malign her either way.  Be they Catholics or heathens, there are plenty of people out there who simply don't care about what else is going on - the simple fact that a single priest has abused someone makes the entire Church suspect at best.

I do think a sort of booklet/email with these and other statistics (getting as much data as possible and the most accurate data possible) would be a good idea, I just don't know what sort of positive response I'd expect - only through the prayers of the Blessed Virgin and by the Grace of God can Holy Mother Church be lifted from this sort of muck.
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#17
The Hundred time is probably overrated (The women associations believe that on women out of 4 was abused), but the conclusion of John Jay report http://www.usccb.org/nrb/johnjaystudy/ that the abused by civilians is far more frequent that that of the clerics is true.

The interesting study will be how many underage children were abused by the layers and the controllers of the media who now attack the Church. Some of you will hear that announced from everywhere. In long term every abuse get its reward.
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#18
(05-06-2010, 11:12 PM)Ravenonthecross Wrote: I am going to be a High History Teacher; I am also discerning whether or not I am called to the Apostolic priesthood. Why is it seem that no matter the potential vocation I have: it is maligned so much whether by secular society.

Do you really think that's the case with teachers?  Every time I've heard someone mention thinking of being a teacher, someone always responds with, "Oh, that's wonderful; we need more good teachers.  It's criminal how little they get paid for how important they are."

My impression is that teachers are admired to an irrational degree by secular society.  That teachers are overworked and underpaid is treated as a truism and repeated everywhere from political campaigns to commercials for crayons.  They're sort of the mirror image of politicians.  Everyone hates politicians as a group, but loves and reelects their local one.  Everyone remembers terrible teachers they had or that their kids have, but thinks "teachers" as a group are wonderful and unappreciated.

I'm not bad-mouthing teachers here; my mom was a teacher, and like any other profession, there are good and bad ones.  (Another sign of how society puts teachers on a pedestal: if you criticize teachers or anything to do with education, you'd better include a disclaimer like I just did, the equivalent of introducing a racist joke with, "Some of my best friends are.....but.....")
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#19
(05-07-2010, 09:01 AM)Mhoram Wrote: I'm not bad-mouthing teachers here; my mom was a teacher, and like any other profession, there are good and bad ones.  (Another sign of how society puts teachers on a pedestal: if you criticize teachers or anything to do with education, you'd better include a disclaimer like I just did, the equivalent of introducing a racist joke with, "Some of my best friends are.....but.....")

Sadly, Mhoram, my experiences are not yours.  Sure, people talk a good game about supporting teachers, but when the chips are down and their kid is failing, chances are they'll blame the teacher rather than the child.  This is not to say that there aren't terrible teachers out there, which is why I am not a supporter of tenure for teachers. 

As for teacher pay, it really depends on what state/community you teach in.  Colorado spending on K-12 education is low compared to other states (and charter school teachers like me get even less), but God forbid you suggest raising taxes a little to secure more funding.  True, funding is not the only problem; the entire system needs to be revamped.  Still, it would be nice if the citizens remembered how much they like teachers when the time came to pony up.
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#20
(05-07-2010, 09:17 AM)Pilgrim Wrote: Sadly, Mhoram, my experiences are not yours.  Sure, people talk a good game about supporting teachers, but when the chips are down and their kid is failing, chances are they'll blame the teacher rather than the child.

Right, but that was my point.  They'll blame an individual teacher, but "teachers" as a faceless group are invariably spoken of as secular saints.
Quote:As for teacher pay, it really depends on what state/community you teach in.  Colorado spending on K-12 education is low compared to other states (and charter school teachers like me get even less), but God forbid you suggest raising taxes a little to secure more funding.  True, funding is not the only problem; the entire system needs to be revamped.  Still, it would be nice if the citizens remembered how much they like teachers when the time came to pony up.

I'm sure it does vary, and teachers working in private schools naturally do take it in the shorts somewhat, since they're dealing with customers who already paid once at the public school.  But salaries, like everything else, are determined by supply and demand.  As long as there are plenty of new teachers at the current salaries, which will be the case as long as colleges of education continue to accept the worst students and have the least rigorous programs, there's no reason for them to go up, which is why the politicians and the unions keep doing it artificially.

Since I live in Illinois, I just looked up 'illinois teacher salary.'  Fun side note: the first page that came up says Illinois is the #1 friendliest state for teachers.  It's also one of the best homeschooling states, since there are no restrictions or requirements whatsoever.  Hmm, think those two things could be connected?

Anyway, it said the average Illinois teacher starts at $37,500, and the average salary overall is $58,686.  Now, certainly there are places in Chicago where $37,500 isn't much money, but remember we're talking about someone fresh out of college and inexperienced.  It's not unusual to have to share an apartment and drive a beater for your first few years after college, no matter what your career path.  By the time you get up to $58K (and more, since that's only the average), you'll be living very well almost anywhere in Illinois.  In many downstate towns, you'll easily be in the top 10% of incomes.  By comparison, some other Illinois salaries I looked up (averages, to compare to teachers' $58K): truck driver - $40K, plumber - $42K, accountant - $42K, attorney - $86K, medical assistant - $30K.  Granted, these careers don't all require a bachelor's degree (but then teaching shouldn't; that's part of the racket), but they're all jobs that require training and responsibility.  All the plumbers I know live quite well, and teachers make 38% more than they do, so they're simply not badly paid.

Funding isn't just not the only issue, it's not an issue at all.  If anything, too much funding has poisoned the schools.  (Which only makes sense: the less you pay a group of people, the more you guarantee that they're there out of love for the work, and not because it's the best way they could find to make a comfortable living.  Raise salaries and you'll only attract more people who wouldn't be a teacher if it didn't pay well, and who thinks they'll make good teachers?  Isn't it the "born teachers" who couldn't imagine doing anything else that we all remember as the great ones?)  Children were better educated when there was less money involved.  Ted Kennedy famously bragged about how Massachusetts had a 99% literacy rate back in colonial times, before common schools even existed there and no one had thought of having government fund schools.

I think it's instructive that you used the term "pony up," since that's usually used in terms of taxes, or when you lose a bet, or when your loan shark comes calling.  It has a connotation of handing over money because you're stuck or forced, not in the sense of voluntary trade where you expect to get value for your dollar.  It's the perfect term for when the schools come crying for more money.
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