Why do you think philosophy is so unpopular here?
#61
Sure. Now, who wants the pick the first candidate?
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#62
I am willing to try the trial Formal Logic class. 
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#63
I'll try starting a thread called FE Philosophy 101, and get the ball rolling. I'm happy to tell people off when they get too highbrow! Will put thread up now.
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#64
The basic problem is that most people find philosophy difficult and to make matters worse of little practical value.

But what most of us understand by "philosophy" is very difficult because what we call philsophy is actually "metaphysics". The good news is that it isn't philsophy just a part of philosophy. It is the hardest, most obscure part of philosophy and so no wonder people are confused and turned off by it.

Starting the study of philosophy with metaphysics is like starting the study of medicine with brain surgery. "Pass me that buzz saw and a probe" of course you are going to get a mess. 

It is also highly impractical. "Mommy I have a headache - Well dear I don't know much about headache tablets but I am a wizz with the buzz saw and a probe"

I am not saying that metaphysics is not valuable or that it should not be studied. Just like brain surgery it is valuable and has its place. The problem is most so-called philosophers (actually they haven't studied philosophy but more metaphysics - so we should call them metaphyscians) are trying to treat most of us headache cases with the buzz saw.  No wonder our heads hurt.

Philosophy is concerned with all knowledge that we can know via reason and is concerned with ordering that knowledge in the correct way. So we are all engaged in philosophy.The problem is that we are not aware of it and so we don’t know if we have an Advil or Buzz saw problem. 

Questions such as: How should we teach our children? What should we teach our children? What are our duties as citizens? Is a particular form of the Mass superior? What do we have to do to be happy? Are all questions of philosophy and you don’t have to be a metaphysician to answer them. You can start getting practical common-sense answers to these questions by studying philosophy.

Have a look at these Crash Course (http://www.sapientisinstitute.org/crashc...urses.html) (http://www.sapientisinstitute.org/crashc...urses.html) to get a sense of how broad philosophy actually is.

What we need is the "Advil" of philsophy i.e the basic common-sense building blocks. The first of those is logic .

Logic is the very first subject we study. We study it first because one ought to know how to use a tool before he actually starts to use it. Well, reason is the tool by which true and certain knowledge is attained, and logic is the science by which we learn how to use reason. So before we start applying reason to any particular field—be it physics or math or even literature—we first learn how to use it. 

Now I think that is very practical. Could even be used to convince husbands. Don't most husbands complain about how illogical their wives are?
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#65

"Questions such as: How should we teach our children? What should we teach our children? What are our duties as citizens? Is a particular form of the Mass superior? What do we have to do to be happy? Are all questions of philosophy and you don’t have to be a metaphysician to answer them. You can start getting practical common-sense answers to these questions by studying philosophy."
:)

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#66
Well said, Chris ZA! I'd also add that many people seem to think metaphysics involves New Age claptrap like Atlantis, UFOs, and auras, and that they don't need to do any rigorous thinking about any of it. The actual work of some of the great metaphysicians (from Plato to Heidegger) has nothing to do with that nonsense.

I do agree, though, that it's more important to answer the question, "What is the best possible life for a human being?" than to answer, "What is the nature of being?" The latter is important, no doubt, but I believe in the priority of ethical, which is to say practical, questions.
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#67
(05-08-2010, 06:03 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(05-08-2010, 05:12 PM)JamieF Wrote: If you were to take a course in Formal Logic you would build up from there.  Until you have done that, you should not bother at all with theology, metaphysics, etc.  Logic is the essential foundation of knowledge - without it you can't deduce whether what you are reading is true or not.  

OK. I have done a course in Formal Logic.  What is the next step?  I just randomly took 3 philosophy courses that I needed as degree requirements and they don't fit together. (As well as the logic course, I did an survey of existentialism and an intro to Aquinas.)  I really want a good foundation in philosophy because I want to be able to do theology properly.   

I think you might really enjoy this book:

https://www.tanbooks.com/index.php/An-In...Philosophy
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#68
(06-10-2010, 11:40 PM)SouthpawLink Wrote: I think you might really enjoy this book:

https://www.tanbooks.com/index.php/An-In...Philosophy

Thanks.  It looks like I won't need to be concerned about this one contradicting Catholic teaching.  That is often a hazard in "higher" education, so I appreciate the recommendation.
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