"To Be or Not To Be"
#21
Minor style comment:

Why is it called "to be or not to be"?  I don't see how that's reflected in the content of the article, and in the context of Shakespeare it had to do with contemplation of suicide.

I think using a cliche phrase as a title, especially when it is not clearly associated with the content, is confusing and also (apologizes, but this is how I feel) seems juvenile or at least unprofessional.  Though sometimes it is, unfortunately, done for magazine articles, etc.

But if you look how many things under the sun are called "to be or not to be" there are bazillions of them and you'll get lost in the noise...

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#22
(05-27-2010, 05:21 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Minor style comment:

Why is it called "to be or not to be"?  I don't see how that's reflected in the content of the article, and in the context of Shakespeare it had to do with contemplation of suicide.

I think using a cliche phrase as a title, especially when it is not clearly associated with the content, is confusing and also (apologizes, but this is how I feel) seems juvenile or at least unprofessional.  Though sometimes it is, unfortunately, done for magazine articles, etc.

But if you look how many things under the sun are called "to be or not to be" there are bazillions of them and you'll get lost in the noise...

That's true. I threw it on there so I could post it with a name for now. Don't worry, it's not official.
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#23
(05-27-2010, 05:21 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Minor style comment:

Why is it called "to be or not to be"?  I don't see how that's reflected in the content of the article, and in the context of Shakespeare it had to do with contemplation of suicide.

I think using a cliche phrase as a title, especially when it is not clearly associated with the content, is confusing and also (apologizes, but this is how I feel) seems juvenile or at least unprofessional.  Though sometimes it is, unfortunately, done for magazine articles, etc.

But if you look how many things under the sun are called "to be or not to be" there are bazillions of them and you'll get lost in the noise...

I don't really don't get into titles much, but unfortunately they are necessary. I haven't decided on anything definite for it yet. Maybe you have some ideas?
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#24
(05-27-2010, 05:21 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: Minor style comment:

Why is it called "to be or not to be"? 

The point was to relate the title to: "to be or not to be" a person. The argument structures the moral considerations of taking a life around the consideration of whether or not the fetus does, indeed, merit the rights of personhood - in a sense, whether or not they are going to be a person by the decisions we make.
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