NO nuns turn convent into massage parlor...LOL
#51
LOOOOOOOOOL

i spit me joe reading that whooly.
sip sip
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#52
(05-27-2010, 07:03 AM)karyn_anne Wrote: MY EYES! @_@

i don't see any evidence that these nuns were trained to give massages for medical or health purposes
  probably because you haven't been trained to know what a professional massage looks like.  the woman on the table is properly draped.  and it's a woman massaging another woman.  also, the room looks more like a medically oriented room than it does any kind of spa setting.  from this picture, there is no evidence that anything untoward is going on.  and for the of God, people, stop calling it a massage parlor!!!  it's only a massage parlor if happy endings are actually going on!
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#53
(05-27-2010, 02:20 AM)Joshua Wrote:
(05-27-2010, 01:58 AM)PeterII Wrote:
Quote:They aren't cleansing the body of a leper or bandaging up a wounded soldier from head to toe. You honestly think everyone goes in for a massage because of some debilitating affliction? Most folks go for recreational purposes.

:hmmm:  Please elaborate.

Whose mind is in the gutter now?

What I was referring to was the pleasurable relaxation and relief from ordinary aches and tension that is derived in a massage. These recreational visits are really the primary source of income for spas and not the occasional medical prescription. There are entire family vacation packages that are geared around spas and up-scale massage parlors. Surely none of this is news to you ... ?

No it's not news.  Hot springs, mineral bath springs and the associated therapeutic services have been around since civilization without the dirty connotation as your family vacation packages show; and legitimate recreation is necessary for all people, although those who use these spas would argue it is primarily of medicinal value.  

But what is ridiculous is your double standard that monks can support themselves by distributing alcohol, but sisters can't run a spa, even though alcohol traditionally has more bad consequences.  Spas have not turned people into addicts, ruining a man's health or family.  It does not lead to drunk driving or immoral behaviour like going into a brothel. If these are all acceptable losses associated with the distribution of alcohol, than so is the the occasional pervert getting his jollies at a spa, although they would be able to get a more satisfying result elsewhere.  
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#54
Even if it's medicinal, they're supposed to be contemplative nuns not nurses. Aren't they only supposed to do business with the outside world through a steel grate? And they have a room for zen meditation, practice chi-kung and other activities which seem out of place in a convent. They got into the spa business in 1969, would nuns running this kind of business be accepted pre-vatican 2?
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#55
(05-27-2010, 11:35 AM)Master_P Wrote: And they have a room for zen meditation, practice chi-kung and other activities which seem out of place in a convent.

Or anywhere Catholic, but that's not unusual, which is why I said, before even reading the article: "From a spiritual perspective, we might worry more about whether they're chanting Eastern mantras and using crystals on people, which aren't uncommon with massage."  No, not every massage therapist is involved with that stuff, but many are, and "Christian spirituality" gets stretched to mean a lot of things these days.
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#56
(05-27-2010, 04:54 AM)glgas Wrote: This is the description of their therapy : "Guests are pummeled with high pressure hoses of chilled mineral waters to stimulate the skin." This does not involves phisical body contact, still the opposing speakers here chew on that. Do not care about the facts and details, attack the Church. 


Gl_the_ass stricks again...reads one therapy and to gl....that's all they offer.


A story about Gl in a bath house in San Fran in 1980 would go something like this...

"Gl. did you go into a bath house and see all the foul acts being done?"

GL, who saw all the foul acts and could describe them perfectly...because he partook answers..."no, I saw no foul acts, all I saw was the towel boy hand out towels."


All this while purposely leaving out the train and circle he was part of and felchfest....and the fact that the towel boy was dressed like a roman boy but with lipstick who's tunic was TOO short...LOL
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#57
(05-27-2010, 04:54 AM)glgas Wrote:
(05-26-2010, 09:38 PM)Melkite Wrote: For those of you opposed to this, are you opposed to massage therapy in general, or just in the case of religious?

It seems to me that they are opposing the Church in general.

This is the description of their therapy : "Guests are pummeled with high pressure hoses of chilled mineral waters to stimulate the skin." This does not involves phisical body contact, still the opposing speakers here chew on that. Do not care about the facts and details, attack the Church. 

Giggles, could you please go to your new religion forums. I gave you a couple of links where you would be accepted with open arms and you would have many people joining in your attacks on traditional Catholics.

Yeah I know...I need to learn some manners.


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#58
PeterII Wrote:But what is ridiculous is your double standard that monks can support themselves by distributing alcohol, but sisters can't run a spa, even though alcohol traditionally has more bad consequences.
 

I have yet to see college kids doing a kegger with Chartreuse.

Regardless, the consumption of alcohol is a problem to those with a pre-existing condition or to those who simply lack responsibility or maturity. There is nothing within alcohol that taps into an innate sinful inclination within man. Anyone can get addicted to absolutely anything.  Whereas seeing and coming into physical contact with the naked bodies of healthy men and women will always present an occasion to sin for both the "patient" and the sister ... except in extreme cases of genuine medical need (where a professional is to be consulted and not a bride of Christ).

In Corde Regis Christi,

Joshua
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#59
(05-28-2010, 01:22 AM)Joshua Wrote:
PeterII Wrote:But what is ridiculous is your double standard that monks can support themselves by distributing alcohol, but sisters can't run a spa, even though alcohol traditionally has more bad consequences.
 

I have yet to see college kids doing a kegger with Chartreuse.

Regardless, the consumption of alcohol is a problem to those with a pre-existing condition or to those who simply lack responsibility or maturity. There is nothing within alcohol that taps into an innate sinful inclination within man. Anyone can get addicted to absolutely anything.  Whereas seeing and coming into physical contact with the naked bodies of healthy men and women will always present an occasion to sin for both the "patient" and the sister ... except in extreme cases of genuine medical need (where a professional is to be consulted and not a bride of Christ).

In Corde Regis Christi,



Joshua

You have this completely backwards.  Sinfulness is the lack of conformity to right reason.  Alcohol contains ethanol which depresses the central nervous system which hampers reason. So in fact, there is something in alcohol that directly taps into the innate sinful inclination of man. 

Contact with bodies is only an occasion of sin when there is direct viewing or stimulation of the genitalia, and that does not take place in legitimate massage.  Like an alcoholic, you would have to have a perverted pre-existing condition to get sexual satisfaction from touching or viewing other parts of the body.  Why should normal people have to suffer because of the weaknesses of a few?


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#60
(05-28-2010, 01:22 AM)Joshua Wrote:
PeterII Wrote:But what is ridiculous is your double standard that monks can support themselves by distributing alcohol, but sisters can't run a spa, even though alcohol traditionally has more bad consequences.
 

I have yet to see college kids doing a kegger with Chartreuse.

Regardless, the consumption of alcohol is a problem to those with a pre-existing condition or to those who simply lack responsibility or maturity. There is nothing within alcohol that taps into an innate sinful inclination within man. Anyone can get addicted to absolutely anything.  Whereas seeing and coming into physical contact with the naked bodies of healthy men and women will always present an occasion to sin for both the "patient" and the sister ... except in extreme cases of genuine medical need (where a professional is to be consulted and not a bride of Christ).

In Corde Regis Christi,

Joshua

Let's see what the Rule of Benedict says about alcohol...

CHAPTER XL
Of the Quantity of Drink


"Every one hath his proper gift from God, one after this manner and another after that" (1 Cor 7:7). It is with some hesitation, therefore, that we determine the measure of nourishment for others. However, making allowance for the weakness of the infirm, we think one hemina of wine a day is sufficient for each one. But to whom God granteth the endurance of abstinence, let them know that they will have their special reward. If the circumstances of the place, or the work, or the summer's heat should require more, let that depend on the judgment of the Superior, who must above all things see to it, that excess or drunkenness do not creep in.

Although we read that wine is not at all proper for monks, yet, because monks in our times cannot be persuaded of this, let us agree to this, at least, that we do not drink to satiety, but sparingly; because "wine maketh even wise men fall off" (Sir 19:2). But where the poverty of the place will not permit the aforesaid measure to be had, but much less, or none at all, let those who live there bless God and murmur not. This we charge above all things, that they live without murmuring.
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