Poll: Which event should be more emphasized?
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Resurection or Passion
#1
Personally I don't think there is a right or wrong answer.
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#2
(06-21-2010, 10:06 PM)serviam Wrote: Personally I don't think there is a right or wring answer.

One makes little sense without the other, but I think it is too easy to ignore the Passion. It should be the centre of focus in our lives, instead of pushed aside for things for which we are more comfortable.

The Passion, the suffering of Christ, was the primary Truth denied in some fashion by the earliest heresies.
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#3
What Herr said.
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#4
The Resurrection is the cornerstone of our Faith.
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#5
Yes, it is hard to say.

I prefer to focus on the Passion because it benefits me more. Focusing too much on the joys of the Resurrection tend to make me a bit complacent and not so interested in contrition, penance, and a firm resolution never more to offend God.

The Church has placed the Resurrection as the greatest feast day of the liturgical calendar, but that doesn't necessarily answer your question.

I think that in our current day and age, it is more beneficial for people to focus on the sufferings of Our Lord. Like Herr_Mannelig said, there were many heresies in the early days of the Church that denied in some way the passion of Our Lord - as if it were all symbolic. Nonsense.

Interestingly enough, those same heresies are alive today, though under different guises. Many Protestants strongly oppose the idea of reflecting, meditating, or focusing on the sufferings of Our Lord because (don't we know?), Our Lord has been risen! Nonsense. 

As a result, the use of a crucifix in prayer is seen as a reverence for a torture device, focusing on the sufferings of Our Lord ignores His resurrection, and reflecting upon the Passion means that you deny Christ's redemption. Nonsense.

Different mysteries help different people. Those who struggle with addictions to lust should focus on the merciful Christ lest they should lose hope. Those who have little sorrow for their sins should focus on the Passion. Those who spend too much time worrying about the harsh judgment they're going to receive for the sins they've committed might do well to focus on the Resurrection.

Ideally, however, they should compliment each other. As has been already said, without each other, they are meaningless. Their end was (is) accomplished jointly because the glory of God was (is) seen in His suffering and death.

In the end, I think it comes down to personal preference rather than what everyone as a whole should do. A person should consider how they compliment each other, but for me, the sufferings of Christ bring me closer to Him. I need to focus on sorrow for sin as a means of cultivating true contrition.

Though the devil would have us think otherwise, God really does want to forgive us, even the moment after we've offended Him for the 1,000th time in a row. Just like there are some people in your life who are struggling to stay on your bad side, but you just want to forget about what they did and welcome them back to your friendship, He's waiting - just waiting - for you to come back to Him. He never turns His back so long as we don't turn our backs on Him. Focusing on the Passion helps to increase this sentiment.
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#6
This question was a big one for me, until just recently. For years I'd always had a semi-scrupulous guilt about considering the Passion to be the most moving thing about Christ, even though I knew that the Resurrection was obviously supposed to be the number one. I never doubted the Resurrection, but it just didn't move me. Partly because the Passion evokes love and real emotion for Christ, and partly because I was always revolted by happy-clappy "Jesus saved me" stuff when I was an adolescent, I could never sort of "get past" the Passion to the Resurrection in a genuine way. Also, I guess the plain truth is that we can relate to and understand the Passion in some way with our natural faculties, but the Resurrection is more a matter of supernatural Faith.

But recently I saw my first Dead Body - that of a priest I loved, on display in his coffin. I'd always heard that a dead body really does look like a "thing" devoid of a "soul", and when I saw his body it really hit me big time. This wasn't the man I knew - it was his body. And the best way I can put it is that the body looked kind of silly - like a wax-work figure of the real thing. And it hit me that the priest I'd loved was obviously somewhere else, and the body wasn't him at all, or at least not much of him. And the main thing that hit me was that he'd gone to a place where trouble-filled reality of life on earth wasn't affecting him any more. The people going to view his coffin, with all their troubles and pecadillos and worries and sins and whatever were stuck in a place that called for constant struggle, but he was beyond that, living still in a place that was connected with the life he'd lived in "this place" but without all its mortal realities.

And it hit me that Christ with His Redemption and Resurrection had made it possible to live life in its fullest sense, past the silliness of "death" down here. That God had wanted us to share in His life so much that Christ had come for us, conquered death and sin and given us grace and His Kingdom for the taking.

And also that life "down here" is beautiful and love-able, even BECAUSE of its difficulties and silliness, and should be valued and loved above all else except for the God who made it possible.

And that Christ was just stating a simple factual truth when He said that the "treasure" we long for down here will influence the "treasure" we have after "death", etc.

And lots of other things... all adding up to really finally appreciating that the whole significance of Christ is not His Passion, but His Resurrection. The words of St Paul finally clicked! "Death where is your sting" + his assertion that our faith is totally based on the resurrection)

Plus I realized why I'd always thought St Therese was the coolest saint ever, for saying "I will spend my Heaven doing good on Earth." She didn't want "Paradise", or a freedom from the problems of mortality - she wanted to live her fullest life and give her most to others, and she had to get to Heaven to do that.
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#7
The protestants usually give preference to the passion, the Post Vatical II Church to the resurrection.

The hypothetical question question what we may ask is:

- suppose that the Jews would not be failing their vocation, and they would be the stewards of the Messias, so Jesus would live among them for old age, die and risen. Would we receive the redemption?

In my way of thinking, God and the world would be reunited through Him, so the redemption would be perfected.

This is hypothesis only, as a matter of fact the Jews failed, Jesus suffered, died and risen.

The real important thing, the big jump is the Incarnation: God descended to us, he became human being

Again in my way of thinking if Adam and Eve would avoid the original sin, He would come, Incarnated and in that case he would not die neither.  So either the death and the resurrection is accidental, consequence of the sin, the incarnation is essential.
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#8
The Crucifixion is what I was taught was paramount. the Passion is the run up to that, and you can not have the Resurrection with out the Crucifixion. The Mass is the re-presentation of the Crucifixion not the Resurrection. This is what always made us different from the Protestants. The Cross without the Corpus ain't Catholic. Protestants are centered on the Resurrection. That is why they have Easter Sunday sunrise services. This is why the have the Lord's supper infrequently and do not consider it the moment of Salvation, just a little memory. The entire Protestant rebellion is against the Eucharist. Jesus could not have risen from the dead had he not died first.
tim
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#9
(06-22-2010, 08:34 AM)timoose Wrote: The Crucifixion is what I was taught was paramount. the Passion is the run up to that, and you can not have the Resurrection with out the Crucifixion. The Mass is the re-presentation of the Crucifixion not the Resurrection. This is what always made us different from the Protestants. The Cross without the Corpus ain't Catholic.

Indeed.

Quote:Protestants are centered on the Resurrection. That is why they have Easter Sunday sunrise services. This is why the have the Lord's supper infrequently and do not consider it the moment of Salvation, just a little memory.

Also true. It is important to note, however, that the Sacrifice of the Mass is offered on Sunday, the day of the Resurrection and the morning after the Jewish Sabbath, exemplifying their intimate connection with each other.

It is fascinating. The Sabbath was celebrated during evening at the end of the week, and the very entomology of the word "Sabbath" means "to cease". The Resurrection occurred in the morning at the beginning of the new week. It is wonderfully symbolic of the Old Testament giving way to the New Testament. That the Moon reflects the light of the Sun as the Old Law reflected the light of the New Law is beautifully foretold in Solomon's Canticle of Canticles:

Quote:9 Who is she that cometh forth as the morning rising, fair as the moon, bright as the sun, terrible as an army set in array? 

Of course, this is the Church we know and love.

Quote:The entire Protestant rebellion is against the Eucharist. Jesus could not have risen from the dead had he not died first.
tim

Yes. However, I think that some might say, "He couldn't have died had He not first been born. Therefore, we should focus most on the Nativity.
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#10
What do you mean by resurrection? Definition 1 or 2?

Definition 1: Post V-II idea of the Resurrection of the Body:
“Paul [St. Paul] teaches not the resurrection of physical bodies but of persons…”


Definition 2: Tradiitional definition prior to V-II:
“The same most holy Roman Church firmly believes, and firmly declares that nevertheless on the day of judgment all men will be brought together with their bodies before the tribunal of Christ to render an account of their own deeds.” (Denz. 464)
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