Do you feel miracles happen less now?
#11
Maybe not.  After all, I'm reading this!

:owl:
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#12
(06-24-2010, 11:03 AM)mistman Wrote: I think Christ works miracles better in a state of simplicity, where the mind is uncluttered by the propaganda of science. We are not the conduits we once were for this magical energy we once had when things were simple.  Do you think miracles have lessened in frequency? Do agree with my theory or have another one?

Every validly ordained priest, Catholic or Orthodox (or other Eastern Church), has the power to perform miracles.  He changes bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ.  It happens thousands of times daily around the globe. There can be no greater miracle than to take common bread and wine and change it into God.
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#13
Well, that’s what I meant by the Church being a permanent sign.  Miracles of that nature happen in all the sacraments.  When somebody says “miracles” I think of the Red Sea parting in half, the burning bush and the pillar of fire and Lazarus being raised from the dead.  The spectacular miracles that inspired Cecil B. Demille to make movies.  You don’t see those anymore.
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#14
I suspect that even at the time Our Lord walked on this earth, the miracles were not so well "seen".  There is a reason the Talmud says he was a sorcerer, they didn't get it. I think I see them all of the time.
tim
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#15
(07-05-2010, 11:42 AM)timoose Wrote: I suspect that even at the time Our Lord walked on this earth, the miracles were not so well "seen".  There is a reason the Talmud says he was a sorcerer, they didn't get it. I think I see them all of the time.
tim

Oh, don't get me wrong.  I am acutely aware of the little everyday miracles.  I was speaking of the big whoppers, like in the Book of Exodus.  I haven't seen the waves of the Ohio River part in two lately  (although in `77 when it froze over, we did "walk on water".   :laughing:  )

Our Lord's miracles, as he moved across the land, were mostly the healing kind; making the lame to walk and the blind to see.  But the word must have got around because he drew huge crowds.    :)

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#16
(07-05-2010, 02:00 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(07-05-2010, 11:42 AM)timoose Wrote: I suspect that even at the time Our Lord walked on this earth, the miracles were not so well "seen".  There is a reason the Talmud says he was a sorcerer, they didn't get it. I think I see them all of the time.
tim

Oh, don't get me wrong.  I am acutely aware of the little everyday miracles.  I was speaking of the big whoppers, like in the Book of Exodus.  I haven't seen the waves of the Ohio River part in two lately  (although in `77 when it froze over, we did "walk on water".   :laughing:  )

Our Lord's miracles, as he moved across the land, were mostly the healing kind; making the lame to walk and the blind to see.  But the word must have got around because he drew huge crowds.    :)

Boy I hope I did this right with the quote.

SCG,  I was thinking along the lines of the Eucharist as you had mentioned. it seems to be lost to many just how miraculous The Mass is. I wasn't contrasting just adding to the discussions. "Everyday Miracles" is a really cool term, and accurate I'm beginning to see miracles when the delivery kid has my order right.
tim
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#17
(06-24-2010, 11:03 AM)mistman Wrote: I think Christ works miracles better in a state of simplicity, where the mind is uncluttered by the propaganda of science. We are not the conduits we once were for this magical energy we once had when things were simple.

Do you think miracles have lessened in frequency? Do agree with my theory or have another one?

   

I don't know if they happen more or less now, but I think it seems pretty clear that miracles take childlike faith to happen.

Matthew 13:[54] And coming into his own country, he taught them in their synagogues, so that they wondered and said: How came this man by this wisdom and miracles? [55] Is not this the carpenter's son? Is not his mother called Mary, and his brethren James, and Joseph, and Simon, and Jude:

[56] And his sisters, are they not all with us? Whence therefore hath he all these things? [57] And they were scandalized in his regard. But Jesus said to them: A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country, and in his own house. [58] And he wrought not many miracles there, because of their unbelief.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#18
(06-24-2010, 11:03 AM)mistman Wrote: I think Christ works miracles better in a state of simplicity, where the mind is uncluttered by the propaganda of science. We are not the conduits we once were for this magical energy we once had when things were simple.

Do you think miracles have lessened in frequency? Do agree with my theory or have another one?

   

I do not think they have.  We hear about them less because anyone who claims to have witnessed one is normally dismissed as a crank (thank you modern science).  However, if you read the right books, listen to the right radio programs, and talk to the right people, you get the impression that miracles are rather ubiquitous.
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#19
The sacrifice of the Mass is a miracle that happens everyday. The accidents of the bread and wine are only sensations which obscure the miracle from our eyes. But these things do not at all prevent the miracle from taking place. If not seeable to the eyes, the miracle is very much seeable to the soul, which, to those who have sensed it, is more a confirmation of Christ's existence under the sacramental veils than anything that sends electrical impulses to the brain. In this sense, the soul's response to the miracle is more reliable than those temporal mediums which tend to deceive, err, and be falsely stimulated.

Those Catholics who are devoted to the Blessed Sacrament - that is, devoted to Christ substantial presence under the sacramental veils - know the graces which make Christ's presence in the Eucharist easily discernable to the soul.

Christ is a friend Whose presence never becomes wearisome.

:monstrance:
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#20
(08-03-2010, 04:58 PM)INPEFESS Wrote: The sacrifice of the Mass is a miracle that happens everyday. The accidents of the bread and wine are only sensations which obscure the miracle from our eyes. But these things do not at all prevent the miracle from taking place. If not seeable to the eyes, the miracle is very much seeable to the soul, which, to those who have sensed it, is more a confirmation of Christ's existence under the sacramental veils than anything that sends electrical impulses to the brain. In this sense, the soul's response to the miracle is more reliable than those temporal mediums which tend to deceive, err, and be falsely stimulated.

Those Catholics who are devoted to the Blessed Sacrament - that is, devoted to Christ substantial presence under the sacramental veils - know the graces which make Christ's presence in the Eucharist easily discernable to the soul.

Christ is a friend Whose presence never becomes wearisome.

:monstrance:

:amen:
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