Southern Cooking done Healthier?
#11
Someone mentioned making your own additive-free sausage, and I just ran across this recipe today: http://180kitchen.wordpress.com/2010/06/...e-sausage/

It uses oregano, garlic, and some other spices for flavoring, so the only nitrates in it would be the ones naturally in the green stuff.

On the other hand, ground pork from quality outdoor hogs like ours tastes great with just a little salt and pepper.
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#12
Mhoram, I wish you had your own natural living thread. I love to read your advice about food and other health-related things. What's the story? Are you and your family crunchy urban farmers or what?
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#13
You know, upon further research, I'm wondering if it's the MSG that's usually added to sausages etc.

Bought some salt pork and a mish-mash of natural bacon ends at the Whole Foods in Houston today.  Will spend the next few nights experimenting.

Can you season a cast-iron pan with salt pork?
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#14
Satori,

Thanks, glad you enjoy my posts!  No, my parents are real farmers; nothing urban about them.  They're not Amish or anything, but they still do things like our grandparents did, on a smaller scale and without most of the costly inputs.  Their livestock are outside on pasture as much as possible, and they've got a little bit of everything like people used to, with dairy cows (the main cash crop), hogs, beef, chickens, etc.  My mom's always had a huge garden, and cans a few hundred quarts of fruits and vegetables every year.  My wife and I plan to get a place in the country, but for now we do our best with raised bed gardens and a small flock of chickens in our little backyard, and we mooch off my folks for the rest.

Miss Fluffy,

You might be onto something with the MSG.  A lot of people report reactions to that, and it's very common in sausage and other processed foods.  I don't know why you couldn't use a piece of salt pork to season a pan; anything that'll give you some grease should work.
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#15
(06-29-2010, 08:38 PM)miss_fluffy Wrote: You know, upon further research, I'm wondering if it's the MSG that's usually added to sausages etc.

Bought some salt pork and a mish-mash of natural bacon ends at the Whole Foods in Houston today.  Will spend the next few nights experimenting.

Can you season a cast-iron pan with salt pork?


I wonder if the salt would oxidize the iron? I don't know... crisco works, and it's better than eating it!

;) 






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#16
try making your own sausages - that way you can control what goes in them.

you can get veg. based casings on line and if you get really good pork and grind it yourself, you barely need any seasonings,  like Mhoram said.

as far as me processing my own pork, I do it Cuban style, so then it's no good for Southern type seasoning... :laughing:


I've smoked chicken and fish before in a cardboard box and it's easy and tastes great -- but THIS I would love to do:




(part 1 of 2)


unfortunately, this video is pretty poor quality - but it shows you how to make your own bacon....mmmmmmmmm.....bacon......


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#17
A well-seasoned cast iron skillet is the true non-stick pan. I don't know why anyone wants those Teflon dealios.
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#18
(06-29-2010, 08:38 PM)miss_fluffy Wrote: Can you season a cast-iron pan with salt pork?

I would think so - i've seasoned a few of mine with bacon, and some of it was pretty salty.  Didn't hurt the pan at all, but I usually use olive oil.
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#19
(06-29-2010, 11:27 PM)Satori Wrote: A well-seasoned cast iron skillet is the true non-stick pan.

Couldn't agree with you more, but...

Quote:I don't know why anyone wants those Teflon dealios.

For convenience, I would say.  Sometimes it's just easier to cook on a steel pan, and then throw it in the sink ( or dishwasher ), and not have to worry about scraping food off the pan, and then re-oiling it, so that it doesn't rust (welcome to the humid South).
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