Traditional Catholic Heritage in Spokane, WA
#1
A bit of northwest Catholic heritage that I thought the fishtank might find interesting.  Mount St. Michaels (or “The Mount” as locals have always known it) was the Scholasticate for the Oregon Province of the Society of Jesus.  My father’s cousin was the rector their in the late 1950’s to the very early 1960’s, until he became pastor of St. Aloysius Parish, adjacent to the campus of Gonzaga University in Spokane, WA.  The Mount is now the CMRI parish and school in Spokane, as the article explains.

If I may reminisce for a moment (and feel free to skip ahead to the article below), when the changes of the Second Vatican Council occurred, I, as most of my generation (I turned 59 on June 28) accepted this as a natural course of events, inspired by the Holy Spirit (we were of the “pray, pay, obey” generation ~ that was the formation in the faith almost all Catholics of that era received, as did our parents, and generations before).  Most were cognizant of some who rejected the post councilor praxis, but had little contact with or understanding of them, other then they weren’t “praying, paying, obeying” as they should.  I remember seeing the news stories about CMRI purchasing The Mount from the Jesuits, and it being a “bit of a scandal” (I don’t recall any of the details of the purchase, nor if the Province knew who the purchaser was, or if the sale was made directly, or through a third party).  From what I have heard there is now a cordial exchange of information about the building and its heritage between the Province and CMRI.  A bit later when the problems surrounding Bishop Francis Schuckardt at The Mount were reported in the Spokesman Review, it reinforced the perception I and many had, that these people (traditionalist Catholics) were real nut cases.  I had no real experience or information to counter that perception accept for a fraternity brother whose family was CMRI (at that time I had no understanding of the different “camps”, if you will, among traditionalist Catholics), which did cause me to think that maybe not all of them are “nut cases”, some may be just “cases”.  Two years ago, while doing a “google” about the Liturgy of the Hours (the new breviary of Pope Paul VI) I happened to run across Fisheaters.  As I’ve mentioned in the past, I was fortunate to have encountered a “my breviary is better than your breviary” thread.  If I had happened upon one of the “skirts” threads it may have just reinforced the “nut case” perception.  Though not having a particular interest in “tradition” as it were, there was something intriguing about the fishtank, and I’ve hung around.  You don’t quite have a “convert” (i.e., if a SSPX chapel opened in my town I wouldn’t leave my diocesan parish, but if they had a decent High Mass, I’d drop in to visit now and again (not receiving Holy Communion).  But I do have a much more realistic perception of, deeper understanding of, and a profound respect for those in the traditionalist Catholic movement.

Additional pictures can be viewed here:
http://www.stmichaels.org/history.shtml
http://www.stmichaels.org/chapel.shtml


If one clicks on the newspaper link below there is a picture of a 90 year old parishioner stripping pant off window frames ~ one is never too old to serve the Church!

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2010/jul/03/glass-from-the-past
Historic Mount St. Michael building needs facelift
Mikep@Spokesman.Com, (509) 459-5454 The Spokesman-Review

There are 138 wood-framed windows in the west wing of Mount St. Michael, a former Jesuit scholasticate on a hill overlooking north Spokane.
They need repainting.
The congregation based in the sprawling compound wants to restore the historic building in preparation for a centennial in 2015.
Members of Spokane Preservation Advocates have offered to help during a “doing it” event on July 17 from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Volunteers are being sought. Lunch will be served.
Those who turn out will get a chance to see the inside of one of the Spokane area’s most curious landmarks, which overlooks Hillyard from atop a prominent foothill north of Bigelow Gulch Road.
Completed in 1917, Mount St. Michael was home to Roman Catholic priest trainees from the Jesuit order until 1968, when the Jesuits consolidated their operation at Gonzaga University.
The building was acquired in 1977 by a breakaway Catholic organization, the Tridentine Latin Rite Church, which rejected Vatican II doctrinal changes in 1965 that allowed English-language Mass among other reforms.
Formally called the Congregation of Mary Immaculate Queen, the church group operates the Late Gothic Revival facility for childhood education, a convent and a traditional Catholic parish with about 600 members.
Women must wear modest dresses and cover their heads, and men are required to wear coats and ties during church services in the building’s ornate chapel.
“It’s like walking into the turn of the century,” said Gary Lauerman of the preservation advocates group. “Nothing has changed.”
On an upper floor, longtime parishioner Alvina Urban, 90, has been spending her days working on the window restorations.
She uses a heat gun to strip old paint from the windows, which were removed by volunteer John Netzel, another parishioner, so they could be repainted safely indoors.
“I just think it’s good to be busy,” she said.
Down the hall, parishioner Rosie Cyr balances herself in a window casing in a building in which she, her husband and their seven children have spent much of their lives.
“I have a vested interest in this,” Cyr said.
The property was acquired in 1881 by the Rev. Joseph Cataldo and operated initially as a farm, supplying Gonzaga with fresh produce and dairy products.
The cornerstone of the building designed by renowned Spokane architect Julius Zittel was laid in 1915; the building was completed in 1917. It was built in the vicinity of the 1866 Mount St. Michael Mission, a Roman Catholic outreach to Spokane Indians.
The complex is listed on the local, state and national historic registers.
The church was the subject of controversy in 1984 when its leader, the late Bishop Francis Schuckardt, was accused of mismanagement and being sexually involved with assistants and forced out of the church.
Since then, the church has operated quietly and may be best known for its Singing Nuns musical group and the blue habits of the convent sisters.
The west wing, where the window work is under way, was completed in 1929.
“On the whole, it looks like the building is in really good shape. The windows need some love,” Lauerman said.

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#2
I was at the Mount about a year ago for a Mass. At the time I didnt know they were such extreme Sedevacantists but the Chapel sure was nice.
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#3
I would have no problem going to a CMRI Mass and even getting communion...but then I'm a weirdo.


I only have a problem with the jacket and tie thing...I don't own a jacket at this point...and I do not like to put on ties.

Looks like a beautiful place.
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#4
a convent of SSPX -affliated Carmelites are there too. discerned with them for a couple of months  :)

http://www.sspx.org/Vocations/carmelites_in_the_usa.htm
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#5
Nicely done, Moneil !  This is tangential to the story but did they quit the Baltimore Catechism during your Grammar School years ?  I ask because I'm the oldest being born in '48 with siblings up to eleven years. As they get younger I can see the diminution in their knowledge of the faith.
Not to go to deep in details but as I go down the line, the things they think that are right is progressively more crazy. You do not sound like them, so I wonder if was the Catechism ?
tim
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#6
I really have a problems with groups like this, however seeing as to the Bishop that as been recently named for the Spokane Diocese I don't see them reconciling any time soon.
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#7
(07-04-2010, 02:08 AM)Scipio_a Wrote: I would have no problem going to a CMRI Mass and even getting communion...but then I'm a weirdo.


I only have a problem with the jacket and tie thing...I don't own a jacket at this point...and I do not like to put on ties.

Looks like a beautiful place.

Eh i have heard some odd stuff about them but i suppose its mostly slander. If i lived in Spokane I'd probably go there the chapel is beautiful.
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#8
(07-04-2010, 06:11 PM)Unum Sint Wrote: I really have a problems with groups like this, however seeing as to the Bishop that as been recently named for the Spokane Diocese I don't see them reconciling any time soon.

How I wish you hadn't said that :( :( :(!

Is he that much against tradition?
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