Celibacy of Deacons
#41
(08-18-2010, 12:01 PM)PeterII Wrote: Being a deacon doctor seems like a great way to do a half assed job in either field.

Not anymore than being a nurse and a sister at the same time, or a cardinal and a prime minister.

There is precedent for all these things, at any rate.
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#42
Continence after ordination of a married cleric ...  while I fully admit to the wisdom of my superiors and the saints which have preceeded us all, I am struck that this concept in many ways seems to deny the import of the words of Christ, "And the twain shall become but one flesh.  Therefore, what God hath joined together, let no man put asunder." 
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#43
(08-18-2010, 04:26 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(08-18-2010, 12:01 PM)PeterII Wrote: Being a deacon doctor seems like a great way to do a half assed job in either field.

Not anymore than being a nurse and a sister at the same time, or a cardinal and a prime minister.

There is precedent for all these things, at any rate.

Nursing sisters live in communities that offer support and don't have the authority of doctors.  Cardinal Richelieu was many things, but not a saint.

A married deacon with children and a normal medical practice would likely have a nervous breakdown in a few weeks. 
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#44
(08-19-2010, 01:05 AM)PeterII Wrote: A married deacon with children and a normal medical practice would likely have a nervous breakdown in a few weeks. 

I know of a married deacon who is also a doctor, but that's strictly anecdotal.

I agree that being a married deacon with children, and a doctor, might be too much for the average man to juggle (my anecdotal deacon aside). For a celibate deacon, it's a different story. I had Saint Luke the Evangelist in mind, who is supposed to have been a physician, but now to think of it I don't know if he ever received holy orders.
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#45
(08-18-2010, 04:54 PM)prostrateinawe Wrote: Continence after ordination of a married cleric ...  while I fully admit to the wisdom of my superiors and the saints which have preceeded us all, I am struck that this concept in many ways seems to deny the import of the words of Christ, "And the twain shall become but one flesh.  Therefore, what God hath joined together, let no man put asunder." 

Not to mention 1 Corinthians 7: 1-5

[1] Now concerning the thing whereof you wrote to me: It is good for a man not to touch a woman. [2] But for fear of fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband. [3] Let the husband render the debt to his wife, and the wife also in like manner to the husband. [4] The wife hath not power of her own body, but the husband. And in like manner the husband also hath not power of his own body, but the wife. [5] Defraud not one another, except, perhaps, by consent, for a time, that you may give yourselves to prayer; and return together again, lest Satan tempt you for your incontinency.

And, as I have mentioned before in other threads, the theory that married clerics were always and everywhere expected to remain continent by apostolic tradition is very doubtful, despite the assertions of Fr. Christian Cochini, S. J. and his followers, Cardinal Stickler and Fr. Roman Cholij.
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#46
The SSPX commentator makes some interesting points... though as always with those who advance a celibate only Sacred Ministry they must be careful not to over step the mark with regard to Apostolic practice, which, as is obvious from the Scriptures, was not to ordain celibates only.

More interesting however, both with regard to married deacons and with the increasing number of convert married ministers being ordained (and presumably more with Anglicanorum Coetibus) is the consideration of 'continence' which from at least the 5thC became a Canonical requirement of married clergy. The Orthodox still practice this, though to a lesser extent i.e. married Sacred Ministers must practice continence at particular times of the year (e.g. Great Lent) and prior to assisting or offering the Sacred Mysteries (Bishops are celibate). A plain reading of Canon 277... § 1. Clerics are obliged to observe perfect and perpetual continence for the sake of the kingdom of heaven and therefore are bound to celibacy which is a special gift of God by which sacred ministers can adhere more easily to Christ with an undivided heart and are able to dedicate themselves more freely to the service of God and humanity. ... would suggest that Latin Rite married Sacred Ministers should practice perpetual continence post-Ordination; in other words, continence rather than just chastity in marriage. However, some Canon Law commentators suggest that § 3. The diocesan bishop is competent to establish more specific norms concerning this matter and to pass judgment in particular cases concerning the observance of this obligation. ... means that individual clerics may be dispensed from the requirement of perpetual continence in marriage at the discretion of the Bishop?

It has variously been suggested to me that most convert married ministers would not consider offering themselves for Ordination if they thought perpetual continence would apply... to which I wonder at the nature of sacrifice for the Sacred Ministry and why a wider relaxation more like the Orthodox is not agreeable in the Latin Rite?  ::)

Re the question of Dalmatics - it is a vestment denoting the Diaconal role, as far as I am aware, Deacons whether permanent or transitional are entitled to wear it whenever appropriate for their liturgical function. Similarly, permanent deacons are Clerics just as transitional deacons and priests are, thus the cassock and the biretta are wholly appropriate dress for them.
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#47
DC, can you post some details of what you typically do as a deacon? Also, how you balance work life, home life and Church life.  I know a married fellow in the Byzantine church who is studying for the diaconate and I am finding myself drawn more and more to it.
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#48
(08-21-2010, 03:19 PM)PaterHieronymus Wrote: A plain reading of Canon 277... § 1. Clerics are obliged to observe perfect and perpetual continence for the sake of the kingdom of heaven and therefore are bound to celibacy which is a special gift of God by which sacred ministers can adhere more easily to Christ with an undivided heart and are able to dedicate themselves more freely to the service of God and humanity. ... would suggest that Latin Rite married Sacred Ministers should practice perpetual continence post-Ordination; in other words, continence rather than just chastity in marriage. However, some Canon Law commentators suggest that § 3. The diocesan bishop is competent to establish more specific norms concerning this matter and to pass judgment in particular cases concerning the observance of this obligation. ... means that individual clerics may be dispensed from the requirement of perpetual continence in marriage at the discretion of the Bishop?

I'm sure that this only applies to priests who are not utilizing the pastoral provision.  I've never heard Rome issue a document that says maried deacons have to abstain from sex or that married priests have to do the same.  I think the intent of the law was only to cover the vast majority of priests who are unmarried.
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#49
[quote='AxxeArp' pid='607640' dateline='1282840338']
DC, can you post some details of what you typically do as a deacon? Also, how you balance work life, home life and Church life.  I know a married fellow in the Byzantine church who is studying for the diaconate and I am finding myself drawn more and more to it.
[/quote


Sorry for taking so long in getting back to you.  As a deacon, my ministry covers three 'areas' - ministry of the Word (proclaiming the Gospel and preaching), ministry of Sacraments (ordinary minister of baptism, witness marriages, ordinary minister for distribution of Holy Communion - along with a number of other liturgical responsibilities) and ministry of Charity; this is an area of outreach which all deacons are expected to undertake - this outreach would be to the poor in their community (poor is a pretty broad term; it could mean materially, socially, spiritually, etc.)
This is, of course, in addition to my responsibilities to my family as a provider, and my responsibilities to my employer - deacons don't get paid to be deacons; the norms are quite clear.  They are expected to provide support for themselves and their families.  There are exceptions where deacons are employed by a diocese for a specific function (accountant, or perhaps a director of youth minstry to a specific ethnic group for example), but these are the exceptions to the rule.
I currently spend about 20 hours a week in visiting and ministering to the elderly and infirmed in nursing homes and residences.  I am also very involved in marriage prep and interviews with young couples, baptism preparation, RCIA instruction, and occasional spiritual direction.  My case is not the norm, but I don't believe that I am particularly exceptional.
I was employed as a police officer at the time of my ordination, and with the help and support of my wife and family, we were able to be attentive to all aspects of my ministry (family, work, parish)
  I have since retired from the force, and have a pension as income; I left so that I could devote more time to my family and ministry.  The balancing of home, work and ministry is not always easy, but then Jesus never promised that following Him would be an easy time.  I thank God continually for the graces He has granted me in being able to serve Him, my family and my community.  I don't know if that adequately answers your questions, but I would be more than happy to share any other  information you may need.  God bless

DC
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#50
(08-31-2010, 12:17 AM)DC Wrote: Sorry for taking so long in getting back to you.  As a deacon, my ministry covers three 'areas' - ministry of the Word (proclaiming the Gospel and preaching), ministry of Sacraments (ordinary minister of baptism, witness marriages, ordinary minister for distribution of Holy Communion - along with a number of other liturgical responsibilities) and ministry of Charity; this is an area of outreach which all deacons are expected to undertake - this outreach would be to the poor in their community (poor is a pretty broad term; it could mean materially, socially, spiritually, etc.)
This is, of course, in addition to my responsibilities to my family as a provider, and my responsibilities to my employer - deacons don't get paid to be deacons; the norms are quite clear.  They are expected to provide support for themselves and their families.  There are exceptions where deacons are employed by a diocese for a specific function (accountant, or perhaps a director of youth minstry to a specific ethnic group for example), but these are the exceptions to the rule.
I currently spend about 20 hours a week in visiting and ministering to the elderly and infirmed in nursing homes and residences.  I am also very involved in marriage prep and interviews with young couples, baptism preparation, RCIA instruction, and occasional spiritual direction.  My case is not the norm, but I don't believe that I am particularly exceptional.
I was employed as a police officer at the time of my ordination, and with the help and support of my wife and family, we were able to be attentive to all aspects of my ministry (family, work, parish)
  I have since retired from the force, and have a pension as income; I left so that I could devote more time to my family and ministry.  The balancing of home, work and ministry is not always easy, but then Jesus never promised that following Him would be an easy time.  I thank God continually for the graces He has granted me in being able to serve Him, my family and my community.  I don't know if that adequately answers your questions, but I would be more than happy to share any other  information you may need.  God bless

DC

It is refreshing to read such articles. Please keep posting

I know at least two deacons (Chicago suburbs) with the same workload.

God bless you and your vocation
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