"In many ways, the American experience is all about forgetting"
#31
(07-15-2010, 06:06 AM)Robert De Brus Wrote: Although I am separated from it by several generations, it still exists in the rural hill country of Maryland, with families such as the Mudds; it was once strong near the border of Virginia.  In fact, if you want to get a fair picture of what English American Catholicism in Maryland was, just take a gander at the people who were caught up in the Lincoln plot (which, in fact, some Unionist briefly referred to it as another 'Popish Plot').  But I suspect you are mostly right;  you see the remnants of it in the early Churches that reflect an English colonial style.  Its near extinction is quite sad to me. 

Fascinating. Is there a book you know of that explores the role of the plotters' Catholicism in Lincoln's assassination? Maybe you'll win me back to the SCV and the MOS&B if it's any good! ;)

I may have an ancestor or two who was a recusant in early Maryland, but my sources on those Maryland lines aren't fleshed out enough. I do have a Frenchman in 17th c Maryland long assumed to have been a Huguenot who turns out--HA!--to almost certainly have been a Catholic, because he left money to a Jesuit in his will.
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#32
(07-15-2010, 02:00 PM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote:
(07-15-2010, 06:06 AM)Robert De Brus Wrote: Although I am separated from it by several generations, it still exists in the rural hill country of Maryland, with families such as the Mudds; it was once strong near the border of Virginia.  In fact, if you want to get a fair picture of what English American Catholicism in Maryland was, just take a gander at the people who were caught up in the Lincoln plot (which, in fact, some Unionist briefly referred to it as another 'Popish Plot').  But I suspect you are mostly right;  you see the remnants of it in the early Churches that reflect an English colonial style.  Its near extinction is quite sad to me. 

Fascinating. Is there a book you know of that explores the role of the plotters' Catholicism in Lincoln's assassination? Maybe you'll win me back to the SCV and the MOS&B if it's any good! ;)

I may have an ancestor or two who was a recusant in early Maryland, but my sources on those Maryland lines aren't fleshed out enough. I do have a Frenchman in 17th c Maryland long assumed to have been a Huguenot who turns out--HA!--to almost certainly have been a Catholic, because he left money to a Jesuit in his will.

No, unfortunately, this is just pieced together through my various readings of Civil War history, although there is probably a source that might flesh it out some (famously, Mary Surratt's son fled to the Papal States where he became a Papal Zouave).  In my case,  I have a single line of English Catholic ancestry, traced through the Stephens family, but I have only been able to trace it back to just before the Revolution due to his military service in the Maryland militia.  This fellow's great-grandson was a Maryland Confederate veteran who later moved to Pennsylvania, and eventually moved to Mexico to work for the Ambassador.  He married a Mexican senorita down there, who gave birth to my maternal great-grandmother, who fled Mexico during their socialist revolution.  Since much of the rest of my ancestry is Protestant, I get my Catholicism through this line (I've never been a Protestant).
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#33
(07-15-2010, 02:50 PM)Robert De Brus Wrote: No, unfortunately, this is just pieced together through my various readings of Civil War history, although there is probably a source that might flesh it out some (famously, Mary Surratt's son fled to the Papal States where he became a Papal Zouave).  In my case,  I have a single line of English Catholic ancestry, traced through the Stephens family, but I have only been able to trace it back to just before the Revolution due to his military service in the Maryland militia.  This fellow's great-grandson was a Maryland Confederate veteran who later moved to Pennsylvania, and eventually moved to Mexico to work for the Ambassador.  He married a Mexican senorita down there, who gave birth to my maternal great-grandmother, who fled Mexico during their socialist revolution.  Since much of the rest of my ancestry is Protestant, I get my Catholicism through this line (I've never been a Protestant).

Interesting line. One thing I really love about America is the flexibility it allows us in selecting our primary kinship group. SImilar to you, I celebrate my heritage in a slightly selective way. My direct male line, the Leblancs, were French-Canadian (and obviously Catholic). The founder of the line was a soldier in the Carignan-Salieres regiment (ca. 1665). All the Leblanc marriages were to other Quebecois down to my great-grandfather, a textile machinery magnate of sorts who apparently wanted nothing whatsoever to do with being ethnic or Catholic. He completely assimilated to WASPdom and married a Southerner. My grandfather did likewise, as did my father. Anyway, it's been interesting to me to discover my Catholic roots, though identifying with them is purely an imaginative leap.
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#34
(07-15-2010, 05:15 PM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote:
(07-15-2010, 02:50 PM)Robert De Brus Wrote: No, unfortunately, this is just pieced together through my various readings of Civil War history, although there is probably a source that might flesh it out some (famously, Mary Surratt's son fled to the Papal States where he became a Papal Zouave).  In my case,  I have a single line of English Catholic ancestry, traced through the Stephens family, but I have only been able to trace it back to just before the Revolution due to his military service in the Maryland militia.  This fellow's great-grandson was a Maryland Confederate veteran who later moved to Pennsylvania, and eventually moved to Mexico to work for the Ambassador.  He married a Mexican senorita down there, who gave birth to my maternal great-grandmother, who fled Mexico during their socialist revolution.  Since much of the rest of my ancestry is Protestant, I get my Catholicism through this line (I've never been a Protestant).

Interesting line. One thing I really love about America is the flexibility it allows us in selecting our primary kinship group. SImilar to you, I celebrate my heritage in a slightly selective way. My direct male line, the Leblancs, were French-Canadian (and obviously Catholic). The founder of the line was a soldier in the Carignan-Salieres regiment (ca. 1665). All the Leblanc marriages were to other Quebecois down to my great-grandfather, a textile machinery magnate of sorts who apparently wanted nothing whatsoever to do with being ethnic or Catholic. He completely assimilated to WASPdom and married a Southerner. My grandfather did likewise, as did my father. Anyway, it's been interesting to me to discover my Catholic roots, though identifying with them is purely an imaginative leap.

The English Catholic line is important to me, as I said, because I get my religion from them.  Both my actual father, and my maternal grandfather were/are irreligious, so they allowed both their families to be raised as Catholic due to the mother.  I too celebrate my main paternal line which is of course Scottish (I have the tartans and even a matching kilt).  Being minor nobles, it was easy to trace my line directly back through Scottish history to about 1000 AD.  I am a descendant of most of the Scottish Kings, including Robert De Brus (hence my name) and most of the Stuarts. My family immigrated in 1734, started out as Catholic, but at some point they fell in with regular Scots immigrants to Virginia and became Calvinists.  Originally from Dumfries, they became quite prominent in Virginia before the Revolution where the patriarch served as a regular Virginia militia Captain under George Washington.  His children were (supposedly) educated with Thomas Jefferson's daughters, as we had a large plantation near Monticello. 

I love genealogy.  Shame my Spanish line is less well documented, but I understand I have an ancestor who was an illegitimate daughter of a Bishop in northern Spain.
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#35
You and I are almost certainly related. PM sent.
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