Catechesis Question
#21
(07-18-2010, 12:06 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Actually, I've taught catechesis (Sunday school) to boys and girls in a NO parish a few years ago. For all it's worth, the program the parish priest gave me - given to him by the Lisbon bishopric - was complete rubbish so I just ignored it.

I used traditional material instead to teach them the basics of religion, especially the Holy Mass and the Sacraments, the History of the Church, etc., but ultimately I realized it was a pointless endeavour to begin with because these kids were living in the Novus Ordo environment. Everything I taught them in the classroom had no real correspondence to their parish experience. I believe I made some contribution to their religious formation but it was clearly not enough.

Thanks for this post as it is a case in point - oil and water.
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#22
Many thanks to everyone who offered suggestions as to materials my boyfriend can use. He's got more than a few copies of the Baltimore Catechism. We were thinking more along the lines of educational materials based on the Catechism--maybe videos or audio clips or something like that?--to make the information from the Catechism accessible in a number of ways, since the materials he has been given use DVDs in addition to the textbook. I've shown him this thread (actually, he asked me to post this question), and he's very interested in looking through all of the links and other information you've all provided. Thanks!

Vetus Ordo--could you perhaps tell me what types of materials you used when you taught CCD?

As for Stubborn, I'd appreciate it if you would kindly stop hijacking my thread. No one asked for an opinion on whether or not we should be involved in an N.O. parish. The fact of the matter is, due to circumstances that are none of your business, we are currently members of and involved with N.O. parishes. You can debate the validity of the N.O. Mass elsewhere. I asked for materials that would help my boyfriend guide these children in the right direction in their religious education. If you haven't got any advice to offer in this regard, then please don't say anything at all.

(07-18-2010, 12:15 PM)DrBombay Wrote: As far as I know, even kids in the NO have souls that need to be saved.  If your bf can provide a little guidance in that area, he's doing a good thing.  Abandoning these kids to the devil is not a wise course of action.

Hear, hear!
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#23
I also have taught 6th grade religious education (until my services were no longer wanted). The book chosen was stupid. Things like lets draw petals and stand together and be flowers.

I used the book in only the very broadest sense, just enough to say we were using it.  I pulled from the Baltimore Catechism as has been mentioned and "This is the The Faith" and some other older catechisms mostly.  I interspersed it with stories of saints and so forth.

At this age they are not quite corrupted. (by 8th grade they get extremely "street" savvy).  They are still children whose imaginations can be captured. I made my class quite traditional. The liberated sister who came on as DRE did  not appreciate it. I remember one day she came into our classroom for a while and after she left one of the students remarked how cold it had felt while she was there.

Good luck!
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#24
(07-18-2010, 01:57 PM)Penelope Wrote: As for Stubborn, I'd appreciate it if you would kindly stop hijacking my thread. No one asked for an opinion on whether or not we should be involved in an N.O. parish. The fact of the matter is, due to circumstances that are none of your business, we are currently members of and involved with N.O. parishes. You can debate the validity of the N.O. Mass elsewhere. I asked for materials that would help my boyfriend guide these children in the right direction in their religious education. If you haven't got any advice to offer in this regard, then please don't say anything at all.

The validity of the NO mass is another subject entirely.

Your boyfriend may as well be teaching protestant 6th graders, do you understand that? 
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#25
(07-18-2010, 02:34 PM)Stubborn Wrote:
(07-18-2010, 01:57 PM)Penelope Wrote: As for Stubborn, I'd appreciate it if you would kindly stop hijacking my thread. No one asked for an opinion on whether or not we should be involved in an N.O. parish. The fact of the matter is, due to circumstances that are none of your business, we are currently members of and involved with N.O. parishes. You can debate the validity of the N.O. Mass elsewhere. I asked for materials that would help my boyfriend guide these children in the right direction in their religious education. If you haven't got any advice to offer in this regard, then please don't say anything at all.

The validity of the NO mass is another subject entirely.

Your boyfriend may as well be teaching protestant 6th graders, do you understand that? 

Well, then he'd better be prepared with some solidly Catholic materials, eh?
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#26
Well, I'll bookmark this thread and will be looking for an update on him before December is over - see if he rolls with the No changes or how long he survives going against the NO grain.
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#27
I used to teach CCD a long time ago, different grade levels at different times. The regular curriculum wasn't heretical or anything, it was just horribly bland. So I also added the Baltimore Catechism to the regular curriculum. In other words I didn't exactly "replace" what the school gave me, but I used the BC to give a "fuller" explanation of the faith and to "fill in the blanks."  (A-hem).  I also made up my own lessons, quizzes, riddles, and plays.. We did the lives of the saints and the kids loved those. The DRE never gave me any problems. 

These days you could do a "Movie Night" and show video clips of The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima etc. They also have those half-hour series of the lives of the saints like Juan Diego and Bernadette. Go to http://www.cccofamerica.com/ to see what I mean.
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#28
Penelope, my general advice to people is to not teach CCD at all. Like most educational set-ups in this country, the students involved are forced to be there. As such, they could care less about the topics at hand. Secondarily, most people enrolled in CCD programs do not have the faith reinforced at their schools or at home. A simple cost-benefit analysis is enough to back off from the idea of teaching CCD. If your boyfriend wants to make a difference in the lives of children, help out with the church's youth group.

Do not, do not, do not provide any additional material for the CCD program. Use what you are given and leave it at that. I did something very similar to what your boyfriend is considering doing some years back when I did some CCD work. I spend the entire summer planning the course. I selected the best orthodox, traditional works and topics to cover in class. When finished with my course prep I individually approached a number of prominent people in the parish (including the priest), and ran my syllabus by them. I was assured by one and all that it was A-Okay. Following the first class a number of parents called the parish office “livid” (as I was later told). It turns out that those “prominent people in the parish,” priest included, had lied to me. They never bothered to look at the outline in the first place. What’s more, not one of them backed me up when I came under pressure. I eventually left the parish (except for participation in Lauds and Vespers) because I would get so furious at how I was treated that I could not concentrate at Mass.

Make sure your boyfriend knows that if a parent calls up the church office threatening to complain to the chancellery that he will get no support from the parish administration whatsoever. Those people’s daily bread comes from the bishop, and the parish administration will bolt from you like rats on a sinking ship is someone threatens to complain to el jefe. Fore warned is fore armed.

Youth groups are much more laid back, and the children – a lesser percentage of whom are forced by their parents to attend - are more receptive to what your boyfriend might tell them. Think about it.
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#29
Yes, maybe Credo's right. Though I received full support from my DRE, a youth group might be a better option than a CCD class.

I must add,, however, that even though CCD children are forced to be there, they are no different from children in Catholic school. If they are baptized, they need to learn their faith. Most of the kids I taught had a good time and they learned their faith.
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#30
I must admit too I've been out of the loop for awhile. I taught CCD in the 1980s and our Archdiocese doesn't even offer it anymore. Now they have "Parish Schools of Religion." I don't know anything about those, or modern CCD programs for the matter. If your husband can't stick to the textbook or be upfront with the school about adding other materials, the Youth Group might be the better way to go. 
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