Colloidal silver? What about other colloidal metals?
#1
http://www.purestcolloids.com/

Colloidal silver, colloidal gold...apparently there's a bunch of colloidal metals you can take as dietary supplements:

Copper
Platinum
Palladium
Iridium
Silica
Zinc
Gold
and of course Silver

Anyone know much about colloidal supplements like these?  Or hear of that website I mentioned at the beginning of this post?

The concept of monatomic gold and it's effects on our brain have cropped up to my attention in the last few months, and I just finished listening to a fascinating lecture about it, and how it was favored by pharoahs. 

Lemme know, someone!
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#2
Stay away from collodial metals, especially silver.  Most metals will collect in the system, especially the more dangerous ones.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argyria

Collodial gold is safer, but the problem with a lot of these metal treatments in modern NewAge interpretations is they come from a misreading of alchemical and Parcelsian principles.  The effects that were promised are not obtained from collodial compounds, but philosophical ones using alchemical processes and living matter (not biologically living, but, for example, living and philosophical gold as opposed to the gold from an ingot).

For example, Wikipedia claims this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colloidal_gold

Quote:A so-called Elixir of Life, a potion made from gold, was discussed, if not actually manufactured, in ancient times. Colloidal gold has been used since Ancient Roman times to colour glass intense shades of yellow, red, or mauve, depending on the concentration of gold, and in Hindu Chemistry, for various potions. In the 16th century, the alchemist Paracelsus claimed to have created a potion called Aurum Potabile (Latin: potable gold). In the 17th century the glass-colouring process was refined by Andreus Cassius and Johann Kunchel. In 1842, John Herschel invented a photographic process called Chrysotype (from the Greek word for gold) that used colloidal gold to record images on paper. Paracelsus' work is known to have inspired Michael Faraday to prepare the first pure sample of colloidal gold, which he called 'activated gold', in 1857. He used phosphorus to reduce a solution of gold chloride.



This is NOT colloidal gold as used on the many websites you read about.  The potable gold of the alchemists is much, much different.  For example:

Joannes Agricola - Treatise on Gold ca. 1638  with my comments

Quote:All true chymists and philosophers [Q: i.e, alchemists] write that common corporeal gold is of not much use in man's body if it is only ingested as such, for no metallic body can be of use if it is not previously dissolved and reduced to the prima materia [Q: that formless mass that is at the root of matter]. We have an example in corals. The virtue of corals is not in the stone or the body but in their red color. If the corals are to release their power, a separation must first occur through a dissolution, and the redness must be separated from the body. Tincture the body is a shell which is left behind quite white, but the essence of the corals, which is quite red, afterwards perfectly accomplishes its effect in man's body because the obstruction has been separated from it (that is, from the stone and the body). Thus you should also deal with gold, silver, iron, lead, and other metals. If they are to bear fruit, they must likewise be separated from their bodies, that is, from their inner earth or slime, to allow their radical moisture [Q: prima materia, more or less] to operate quite unhindered in man's body. Before, its power could not accomplish it, as the bodies were still held by their metallic slime and earth. Consequently, whoever wants to do something useful in medicine must see to it that he first dissolve and open his metallic body, then extract its soul and essence, and the work will then not result in no fruit.
...
Fine gold, 2,3,4, Lots, or as much as you like. It must first be poured three times through antimony, each time driving the antimony off on a cupel, as goldsmiths and refiners know how to do. Of that Basil of the Benedictine Order says as follows: The Grey Wolf must eat the Lion, which must be devoured by it three times, after first purifying itself and cleansing its eyes with the Wolf's blood, so that they shine brightly. The Wolf is the antimony; the Lion, however, the pure gold. When now the gold has thus been purified, have it beaten thin like paper. Make of it round, rolled-up rolls that can be put into a separator. Pour on it Aquam Regis (King's water) that has previously been conjoined with the sublimated ammonia during distillation and rectification. This water must stand two fingers' high above the gold. Now close the mouth of the retort, so that the spirits do not vanish. Set the glass in warm ashes and dissolve it in the Balneum and gently distill the moisture off it. Then refine it strongly in the sand till the corrosive or sharpness has altogether gone over the head. The gold will be left at the bottom of the vessel like a brown powder or dust. [Q: does this sound like collodial gold?]

This powder must afterwards be reverberated, closed, in a steady fire, day and night for 13 weeks. the heat must be such that the gold neither flows nor melts. In the heat the gold will stew in its own juice, so that it will thereafter in the second dissolution drop its earth and metallic slime. After that, take one-third of the subtle gold calx and pour its own water over it. It is a crystalline, transparent, mineral water, quite pure and delicate, which Paracelsus calls the Green Lion and Basil, Aquam Solventem (Dissolving water). Take nine parts, everything closed in a phial, let it circulate for three weeks in a vapor-fire, and the gold will turn into oil, leaving its slime and earth behind. Regarding this metallic earth, its virtue is to dry in surgery and also to heal, especially every fluid damage. This preparation is done according to the chymical and not to the common method [Q: i.e., one has to use an alchemical process, not chemistry]
....

I can imagine that Basil Valentine means antimony by the term Grey Wolf - much less Paracelsus. Although many call antimony the Grey Wolf, it is only to be understood figuratively and is only enigmatically true. Is it that antimony, or the Grey Wolf, refines gold and adds a beautiful lustre to it? But how does it help the Philosophical Work? For all philosophers admit unanimously that their gold is no common gold. Yes, their gold dissolves gold. If then it is not common gold, how can it be processed through antimony? Common gold is dead and powerless, unless it be dissolved through the prima materia out of which it was born, and be born a second time. Only then will it really become Philosophical Gold and aurum potable, a small dose of which can drive away all sicknesses in a short time. [Q: the promises of the cure are only given to alchemical living gold, not chemically obtained gold]

That is clearly NOT collodial gold even though the ones promoting collodial gold, and wikipedia itself, confuse them.  If one is talking about a purely chemical preparation, one has to accept the clear scientific evidence that has investigated chemical preparations: collodial metals are injurious.  Stick with vitamins, healthy eating, and exercise.  If you want to put chemicals in your body, stick with those that have scientific evidence of safety and efficacy.

Science can prove or disprove the effects of chemistry quite well and those proofs should be observed, not the misapplication of alchemical principles which apply only to alchemy, not chemistry.  Collodial metals are chemical, not alchemical, and the scientific results are the true and proper ones.

Stay away from them.

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#3
(07-24-2010, 05:52 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: That is clearly NOT collodial gold even though the ones promoting collodial gold, and wikipedia itself, confuse them.  If one is talking about a purely chemical preparation, one has to accept the clear scientific evidence that has investigated chemical preparations: collodial metals are injurious.  Stick with vitamins, healthy eating, and exercise.  If you want to put chemicals in your body, stick with those that have scientific evidence of safety and efficacy.

Science can prove or disprove the effects of chemistry quite well and those proofs should be observed, not the misapplication of alchemical principles which apply only to alchemy, not chemistry.  Collodial metals are chemical, not alchemical, and the scientific results are the true and proper ones.

Stay away from them.

An interesting, thorough, and strong opinion!  Do you have experience or history with this sort of thing, Quis? 

I did a small overlook of the website I provided, and I deduced that they were saying this:

monatomic gold = ionic gold = gold chloride = neurotoxin = a Peripheral Neuropathy.

They say that they are not ionic gold nor gold cholride. 

In my superficial search on the subject (from here at work), I've stumbled across this forum discussing it.  http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread342622/pg1
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#4
(07-24-2010, 05:16 PM)LaramieHirsch Wrote: http://www.purestcolloids.com/

Colloidal silver, colloidal gold...apparently there's a bunch of colloidal metals you can take as dietary supplements:

Copper
Platinum
Palladium
Iridium
Silica
Zinc
Gold
and of course Silver

Anyone know much about colloidal supplements like these?  Or hear of that website I mentioned at the beginning of this post?

The concept of monatomic gold and it's effects on our brain have cropped up to my attention in the last few months, and I just finished listening to a fascinating lecture about it, and how it was favored by pharoahs. 

Lemme know, someone!

There are many minerals used in our body. It is generally not that safe to consume them unnaturally and out of context. I do not know about that site, but I certainly don't trust it. Read its FAQ.

Quote:Can MesoSilver or MesoGold cause heavy metal poisoning?

No. By some definitions silver is considered a heavy metal, but it is also a noble metal. The noble metals are gold, silver, and the platinum group of six metals which includes platinum, rhodium, palladium, ruthenium, osmium, and iridium. When used as dietary supplements the noble metals do not cause heavy metal poisoning.

That may be true, but iridium is extremely rare in the human body and absorbtion of an element like iridium is very difficult (it isn't reactive with much).

Osmium reacts with oxygen to form osmium tetroxide, which is very dangerous to even be around.

Ruthenium has no no use in the body and can also be very dangerous.

Not list them all, but these metals are best suited for electrical use, not consumption. There is a reason why iridium is found in spark plugs and not on food labels.

Quote:Does silver or gold accumulate in the organs of the body?

No. The metallic particles contained in MesoSilver and MesoGold are in the form of nanometer sized particles. These particles do not accumulate in body tissues or any organs. The nanoparticles are passed out of the body with waste within a few days of being ingested.
If this is true, then it is safe, but entirely useless. Might as well drink sea water, which probably has more gold and other minerals in it.

If this stuff isn't harmful, then it is likely very useless (hence, safe).

If you want to have proper mineral consumption, eat plenty of nuts and other plants.
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#5
(07-24-2010, 06:31 PM)LaramieHirsch Wrote: An interesting, thorough, and strong opinion!  Do you have experience or history with this sort of thing, Quis? 

Yes and no.  I have a great respect for the philosophical precursors to the natural sciences: alchemy, astrology, etc., so I have read many of them.  And being a Coast to Coast (Art Bell) fan, I have read up on colloidal metals, etc. 

Quote:I did a small overlook of the website I provided, and I deduced that they were saying this:

monatomic gold = ionic gold = gold chloride = neurotoxin = a Peripheral Neuropathy.

They say that they are not ionic gold nor gold cholride. 

In my superficial search on the subject (from here at work), I've stumbled across this forum discussing it.  http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread342622/pg1

OK, here's the common sense approach.  You are a pharmaceutical company.  You discover that gold heals all kinds of crap.  You can produce this potable gold for $5 a gallon, and because of patent law, you have 20 years to exclusively charge $5000 a gallon for it, and insurance companies will pay for it.

Would you make this stuff?  You bet.  And you would steal an idea off the internet and figure out a way to change the process enough so you can patent the new process and underprice everyone else as well.

The reason some pharma company hasn't is that it would never get through FDA trials.  The FDA tests one thing pretty good: the medicine that comes out actually works for the most part.  Where the FDA fails, when it does, is ensuring medicine is safe.  I think that's because historically the FDA was first worried about protecting people from snake oil and haven't really put the effort required into making things safe.

The fact of the matter is that collodial silver etc. was used in medicine for quite a while.  They stopped using it because they found safer and more effective medicines.  And they never used it as a tonic as is suggested here.  There is no such thing, IMO, as a "tonic".  The true tonic is healthy eating, maybe some vitamins or herbal supplements (and you only need those to make up for eating that Twinkie instead of another helping of spinach).

For a healthy body, all we need is in our food because God's not an idiot and gave us what we need.  Medicines and such are to correct system failures and the like, plenty of which are caused by poor diets, lack of exercise, stress, etc., more than anything else.

Really, this is just modern snakeoil. 


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