Refusing treatment from healthcare professionals of the opposite gender
#11
Gender is pretty much the last thing on my list when looking for a healthcare provider. I've had cruel and incompetent men and women care for me. I've had amazing men and women care for me. Currently, my GP is female and my OB is male. He is kinder, gentler and more respectful than many midwives I have used.
Competence and compassion are what matters, not gender.
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#12
(08-16-2010, 09:34 PM)dark lancer Wrote: My question also applies to men seeking treatment for certain things.  I don't mean something like having a female hygienist when visiting the dentist for a regular checkup, but if there are problems in or with certain areas should female nurses or doctors be asked to leave the treatment room?

Obviously in a critical situation a physician or professional of the opposite gender may be necessary as a last resort, but I'm asking about regular or urgent visits to a physician.

Patient comfort should a priority when possible, so extra people should not be around if they are not wanted. However, when it comes to examinations of various sorts, if a person is qualified, they usually have the professionalism to divorce themselves from the situation (ie, they see it as a job, not as a personal interaction) and legally, they are restricted when communicating to others.

I haven't had any experiences as an adult with such things (as a child, it didn't matter), so I really don't know how it is. When it comes to examinations though, you should be able choose who you see, so it shouldn't be random.
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#13
I had to make a dermatology appointment once and got bumped from a male dermo to a female.  It was weird and I never went back for the followups.

I don't think there are any men dermos in my area (covered by my insurance).  I'll probably just die from a dermo disease rather than get treated by a female dermo.

Plus, I'm a guy and will probably die from medical procrastination anyway. :laughing:
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#14
(08-22-2010, 02:34 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: I'll probably just die from a dermo disease rather than get treated by a female dermo.

I had a very hard time finding a dermatologist I liked, and now that I think about it they were all women until the one I stayed with. Dermatologists are weird anyway and in my experience don't seem to even try to solve problems but just prescribe, prescribe, prescribe. Maybe a male dermo will at least put on a show of knowing what he's talking about and pretending to care.

I prefer to have a woman doctor as a primary care physician, but otherwise I wouldn't necessarily care either way. I can see how men would prefer male doctors etc. but for women there's the added factor that for a painful or uncomfortable procedure (even something mild like getting your teeth cleaned or whatever) a man will often be more gentle with a woman than another woman would be. There's less of the "If it doesn't hurt me then it doesn't hurt you" attitude.
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#15
(08-22-2010, 04:20 PM)Iolanthe Wrote:
(08-22-2010, 02:34 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: I'll probably just die from a dermo disease rather than get treated by a female dermo.

I had a very hard time finding a dermatologist I liked, and now that I think about it they were all women until the one I stayed with. Dermatologists are weird anyway and in my experience don't seem to even try to solve problems but just prescribe, prescribe, prescribe. Maybe a male dermo will at least put on a show of knowing what he's talking about and pretending to care.

I prefer to have a woman doctor as a primary care physician, but otherwise I wouldn't necessarily care either way. I can see how men would prefer male doctors etc. but for women there's the added factor that for a painful or uncomfortable procedure (even something mild like getting your teeth cleaned or whatever) a man will often be more gentle with a woman than another woman would be. There's less of the "If it doesn't hurt me then it doesn't hurt you" attitude.

On the other hand you could have a male physician delivering your baby and saying things like "oh it's not that painful."

I suspect that any sane jury would move to acquit, though.
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#16
(08-22-2010, 09:45 PM)dark lancer Wrote: On the other hand you could have a male physician delivering your baby and saying things like "oh it's not that painful."

Each of my first five babies were delivered by 5 different male obstetricians.  None of them said anything so silly.
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#17
(08-22-2010, 10:04 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(08-22-2010, 09:45 PM)dark lancer Wrote: On the other hand you could have a male physician delivering your baby and saying things like "oh it's not that painful."

Each of my first five babies were delivered by 5 different male obstetricians.  None of them said anything so silly.

Yeah, I figured that it was unlikely.
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#18
I prefer male doctors and all my OB/GYNs have been men.  In all instances where I was examined a female nurse was in the room to assist.  I wonder if that is a policy or just good industry practice.
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#19
Probably policy. My first OB/GYN asked if I'd like the nurse to come in bofore the exam but he was pretty old school. My next guy straight out told me, "I'm going to have the nurse come in now."
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#20
I haven't had a female doctor/nurse do anything personal  since I was young (I think still in elementary school), but I'd feel weird being "examined" down there by someone who is possibly attracted to me.  Not that it doesn't feel awkward having a male doctor telling you to turn and cough, but at least the worst thing he's feeling is the same awkwardness.
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