The ends of the Mass
#1
In the (third grade) Catechism (moderate Catholic community with new Mass)  of my grandson this is defined as:

Gathering in the name of Jesus Christ
Learning the words of Jesus Christ
Offering our gifts together with Jesus Christ
Participating in the sacrifice of Jesus Christ
Receiving the body of Jesus Christ
Going to the mission given by Jesus Christ

This ends are clearly expressed either in the New Mass and the TLM

Question: What are the ends of the mass for those, who reject the New Mass?.
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#2
361. What are the purposes for which the Mass is offered?

The purposes for which the Mass is offered are: first, to adore God as our Creator and Lord; second, to thank God for His many favors; third, to ask God to bestow His blessings on all men; fourth, to satisfy the justice of God for the sins committed against Him. 
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#3
(09-07-2010, 07:20 AM)Stubborn Wrote: 361. What are the purposes for which the Mass is offered?

The purposes for which the Mass is offered are: first, to adore God as our Creator and Lord; second, to thank God for His many favors; third, to ask God to bestow His blessings on all men; fourth, to satisfy the justice of God for the sins committed against Him. 

I miss the meeting with Jesus Christ (participating in His sacrifice, and receiving His body? Why these are not important for you?

As for your criteria:

The adoration is clear in the Gloria and preface in both the New Mass and the TLM

The word thanks occure one mer times in the New Mass than in the TLM because in the new Mass it is mentioned before the consecration of the blood too

The all men is mistranslation in the New Mass,  In the offertory the all men is extended to all creation in the New Mass, and the Canon is the same

In my world we are not able to satisfy God's justice, and this is why I miss the mention of the real presence of Jesus Christ.

(If your quote is from the Baltimore Catechism, that is not the revelation, neither the official declaration of the Church. It could be deeply incomplete)
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#4
(09-07-2010, 07:38 AM)glgas Wrote: I miss the meeting with Jesus Christ (participating in His sacrifice, and receiving His body? Why these are not important for you?

Re read my reply. You certainly do miss participating in His Sacrifice if you attend the NO.

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#5
The traditional "ends of the Mass" as with any complete prayer are four:

ARTS

Adoration -- Recognition of God as God and our submission to his Will.
Reparation -- To make up for our faults and those of all people from all time.
Thanksgiving -- To recognize and repay with our time and prayer for the graces we have recieved.
Supplication -- To ask of God all the material and spiritual gifts that we need.
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#6
(09-07-2010, 07:38 AM)glgas Wrote: (If your quote is from the Baltimore Catechism, that is not the revelation, neither the official declaration of the Church. It could be deeply incomplete)

Methinks it's a poor choice to suggest the Baltimore Catechism is "deeply incomplete," given it's orthodoxy and longstanding use, while at the same point, trusting as acceptable a set of questionable "end of the Mass" which are clearly focused on self, not God and clearly omit any reference to the Mass as repartitive, or as an act of adoration.
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#7
(09-07-2010, 08:32 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote:
(09-07-2010, 07:38 AM)glgas Wrote: (If your quote is from the Baltimore Catechism, that is not the revelation, neither the official declaration of the Church. It could be deeply incomplete)

Methinks it's a poor choice to suggest the Baltimore Catechism is "deeply incomplete," given it's orthodoxy and longstanding use, while at the same point, trusting as acceptable a set of questionable "end of the Mass" which are clearly focused on self, not God and clearly omit any reference to the Mass as repartitive, or as an act of adoration.

Why Jesus Christ, and especially eating His body (which is explicitly commanded by the Gospel) is not mentioned?

Usual traditionalist miracle word is the 'ambiguous', which means that a text which does not explicitly mention what they think is important, than that is wrong.  Should the same principle apply to the text what they like, or that is different that follows the interest of the Party/group.
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#8
(09-07-2010, 07:20 AM)Stubborn Wrote: 361. What are the purposes for which the Mass is offered?

The purposes for which the Mass is offered are: first, to adore God as our Creator and Lord; second, to thank God for His many favors; third, to ask God to bestow His blessings on all men; fourth, to satisfy the justice of God for the sins committed against Him. 

Indeed, the Baltimore Catechism quite closely follows the theology manuals that were around at the same time:

"[A] sacrifice which offers to God Christ's oblation as an act of adoration, thanksgiving, satisfaction and intercession" (McHugh and Callan, Moral Theology: A Complete Course,  vol. II, sec. 2709, p. 668).

"The sacrifice of the Mass is not only latreutic and eucharistic, but also it is impetratory, and propitiatory for the living and the dead" (Fr. A. Tanquerey, A Manual of Dogmatic Theology, sec. 1081, p. 275).

"Five effects [of the Sacrifice of the Mass] are normally given:

a) worship (or latria);
b) thanksgiving;
c) impetration for grace;
d) propiation for the sins of the world;
e) satisfaction for the punishment due to sins" (Fr. D. Prummer, Handbook of Moral Theology, sec. 613, p. 279).

"The Sacrifice of the Mass is not merely a sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving, but also a sacrifice of expiation and impetration (De Fide.)" (Dr. Ludwig Ott, Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, p. 412).


From the Roman Catechism: "[T]he sacred and holy Sacrifice of the Mass is not a Sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving only, or a mere commemoration of the Sacrifice performed on the cross, but also truly a propitiatory Sacrifice, by which God is appeased and rendered propitious to us. ... its benefits extend not only to the celebrant and communicant, but to all the faithful, whether living with us on earth, or already numbered with those who are dead in the Lord, but whose sins have not yet been fully expiated." - Note: the Council of Trent, Sess. XXII, can. 3 mentions: "praise and thanksgiving... propitiation... and other necessities" (Denz. 950).

And finally: "The Eucharist is a sacrifice of thanksgiving... also the sacrifice of praise... offered in reparation for the sins of the living and the dead and to obtain spiritual or temporal benefits from God" (Catechism of the Catholic Church, par. nos. 1360-1361, 1414).


The catechism that glgas mentioned seemed to mix up the ends with the fruits, as well as the distinction that the Holy Eucharist is both a sacrament and a sacrifice.
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