Panic attacks during Mass
#11
(09-13-2010, 06:25 PM)amasimp Wrote: This does have an effect on my faith.  Come to think of it, I'm more likely to have a panic attack when I'm not particularly keen on going to church that day.  Of course, the idea of having a panic attack contributes to that desire.  As for this being a cross God gave me, if that is the case I have to wonder what is God's obsession with giving me crappy things to deal with -- a dead fiancee, infertility, and panic attacks during Mass.  Seriously, if this is the way God "loves" me, than I don't want it any more.


God never promised joy in this life. Indeed, we were warned of the trials of this world.

God counts all the blades of grass and all the birds. He knows everyone fully. You most intimately know your own life only. Perhaps God knows something we don't when something happens to us we would not have chosen?

It is easier to forsake the things of the world when the world opposes us. It takes a lot of effort to reject this world, as we must if we wish to live for God, when it treats us pleasantly.

I used to have a problem with anxiety attacks for years. Then, I was able to find the cause and fix it and I haven't had any. I was so happy to be free from them. Perhaps too much. I had one a couple months ago at work (thankfully, right after and no one saw). Perhaps I am not as strong as I thought I was. Perhaps I do still need God. Why did I get one? Why did I get it at the least convenient place I've even been? Why did it not actually interfere with my job, yet, happen there? God knows. I do not. I am content with that situation.
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#12
I get panic attacks, too -though not at mass.  Check with your doctor as there are a number of meds that can be helpful for the attacks (I'd reccomend, but I don't even play a doctor on tv...) 
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#13
(09-13-2010, 06:25 PM)amasimp Wrote: This does have an effect on my faith.  Come to think of it, I'm more likely to have a panic attack when I'm not particularly keen on going to church that day.  Of course, the idea of having a panic attack contributes to that desire.  As for this being a cross God gave me, if that is the case I have to wonder what is God's obsession with giving me crappy things to deal with -- a dead fiancee, infertility, and panic attacks during Mass.  Seriously, if this is the way God "loves" me, than I don't want it any more.

I don't believe God "gives" most of us crappy things to make us holier. I once knew a daily Mass-goer who stopped coming to Mass when she got cancer. When asked why she stopped coming, she answered: "What good did it do me?" So not everyone becomes a saint when suffering puts them to the test. Some people lose their faith and end up very bitter instead.

Crap happens mostly because it just happens. Broken bodies and broken hearts are a part of life. But, knowing that God can prevent suffering if he wanted to, and doesn't, won't help your perspective. We all have crosses to bear, and to be honest with you, I wouldn't trade mine for anyone else's. They are mine and unique to me and what makes me who I am.. Some of my crosses I brought on myself, others I didn't ask for. I only ask God to give me shoulders strong enough to carry them, and to occasionally send me a Simon or a Veronica or a Mary to help me along the way.

I'm rambling, sorry. I just wish I could help.
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#14
(09-13-2010, 08:49 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(09-13-2010, 06:25 PM)amasimp Wrote: This does have an effect on my faith.  Come to think of it, I'm more likely to have a panic attack when I'm not particularly keen on going to church that day.  Of course, the idea of having a panic attack contributes to that desire.  As for this being a cross God gave me, if that is the case I have to wonder what is God's obsession with giving me crappy things to deal with -- a dead fiancee, infertility, and panic attacks during Mass.  Seriously, if this is the way God "loves" me, than I don't want it any more.

I don't believe God "gives" most of us crappy things to make us holier. I once knew a daily Mass-goer who stopped coming to Mass when she got cancer. When asked why she stopped coming, she answered: "What good did it do me?" So not everyone becomes a saint when suffering puts them to the test. Some people lose their faith and end up very bitter instead.

Crap happens mostly because it just happens. Broken bodies and broken hearts are a part of life. But, knowing that God can prevent suffering if he wanted to, and doesn't, won't help your perspective. We all have crosses to bear, and to be honest with you, I wouldn't trade mine for anyone else's. They are mine and unique to me and what makes me who I am.. Some of my crosses I brought on myself, others I didn't ask for. I only ask God to give me shoulders strong enough to carry them, and to occasionally send me a Simon or a Veronica or a Mary to help me along the way.

I'm rambling, sorry. I just wish I could help.

Yeah but that's their act of will to be bitter rather than resigned. God can lead us to water...
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#15
(09-13-2010, 02:34 PM)amasimp Wrote: For a while, I thought it was the crowds and the incense, so I stopped going to High Mass.

I always sit on the end of the pew, because sitting in the middle triggers claustrophobia, which triggers a panic attack.  I always sit towards the back in case I have to make a quick exit.

I wish i knew why I get them.  It seems almost random.  I will have them a few weeks in a row, then none for a couple of months.  But ALWAYS at Mass. 

It is very disconcerting. 

It's definitely not random.  You just have to figure out what is triggering your anxious feelings.  It sounds like claustrophobia is definitely a part of it.  Could it also be that you experience them mostly at Mass because it's a place and time that means a lot to you and/or you don't want to cause a disruption?

Do you feel better if you sit on the end of the pew by a door out?
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#16
Is there a side chapel where you can go sit by yourself more or less out of view? That's what I used to do when I just couldn't bear to be in there with all those people.

These sorts of issues are one of the reasons I'm against the NO as commonly offered. It is so people-focussed and touchy-feely that it's a nightmare for people with anxiety, who just want to be left alone and allowed to fulfill their Sunday obligation in as much peace as they can muster. At least you have a traditional Mass to go to.

My heart goes out to you.
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