Papal spokesman: "The Catholic Church wants to build a multi-faith society...."
#1
"The Catholic Church wants to build a multi-faith society in Britain."

Here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-11309357

Contrast with:

http://www.papalencyclicals.net/Greg16/g16mirar.htm

&

http://www.papalencyclicals.net/Pius09/p9quanta.htm

&

http://www.papalencyclicals.net/Pius09/p9syll.htm

Reply
#2
Quote:"The Catholic Church wants to build a multi-faith society in Britain. And the Pope will have important messages about the role that religious faith can play in civil society."

Ugh. Gross.
Reply
#3
Those were indeed the words this English monk, who also seems to have a TV show said. But it is also very clear that he does not work with the pope in any capacity as a real spokesman for the pope. It is also clear from the context of the conversation that his talk of building a multi-faith society in Britain was meant to counter the attempt by others, prominent in the UK, to erase all religion from the country. In this context, yes, we want a Britain that welcomes faiths, because we need that to be the case if our message is to be heard.

He is an interesting fellow. He also was critical of modern culture and defends Catholic tradition. In answer to a question of whether more people would join the Church if we changed our traditional stances on things like gay marriage, etc., Fr. .Jamison says,

"the Catholic tradition is a robust tradition. Parts of it are in fashion at certain times and out of fashion at certain times, and then, lo and behold, it all changes. That is a reason to be cautious. The cultural assumption of the Catholic tradition and the cultural assumption of modernity are in different places."

Does Jamison feel optimistic for the future of his church this Easter, given all that has happened in recent weeks? "I refuse to label myself as optimistic," he replies. "I am full of hope, and hope begins when optimism runs out. We should all be profoundly pessimistic about our contemporary situation, globally and politically, but I have hope because the church can offer insights about what I suspect will be a very difficult coming decade."
Reply
#4
As a stamblingblock for the Pharises Jesus built a gentile Church, against the very strict tradition
Reply
#5
I wish people learned to read, not "papal spokesman" but "papal visit spokeman" what a shock England is full of weak prelates that believe in Kasper mush
Reply
#6
(09-15-2010, 02:39 PM)maldon Wrote: Those were indeed the words this English monk, who also seems to have a TV show said. But it is also very clear that he does not work with the pope in any capacity as a real spokesman for the pope. It is also clear from the context of the conversation that his talk of building a multi-faith society in Britain was meant to counter the attempt by others, prominent in the UK, to erase all religion from the country. In this context, yes, we want a Britain that welcomes faiths, because we need that to be the case if our message is to be heard.

He is an interesting fellow. He also was critical of modern culture and defends Catholic tradition. In answer to a question of whether more people would join the Church if we changed our traditional stances on things like gay marriage, etc., Fr. .Jamison says,

"the Catholic tradition is a robust tradition. Parts of it are in fashion at certain times and out of fashion at certain times, and then, lo and behold, it all changes. That is a reason to be cautious. The cultural assumption of the Catholic tradition and the cultural assumption of modernity are in different places."

Does Jamison feel optimistic for the future of his church this Easter, given all that has happened in recent weeks? "I refuse to label myself as optimistic," he replies. "I am full of hope, and hope begins when optimism runs out. We should all be profoundly pessimistic about our contemporary situation, globally and politically, but I have hope because the church can offer insights about what I suspect will be a very difficult coming decade."

Now contrast that muliebral pansy language with that of Mirari Vos, Quanta Cura, and the Syllabus of Errors found via the additional links I provided above.
Reply
#7
Pity they're all dead. None can say what they would sound like today.
Reply
#8
(09-15-2010, 10:16 PM)maldon Wrote: Pity they're all dead. None can say what they would sound like today.

I didn't say a thing about sound.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)