ADHD, Meds and Adult behavior
#1
Hello everyone. I am curious if anyone here knows of someone or is related to someone who has been truly diagnosed with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). I was diagnosed last week by a councilor at school, a psychologist and a medical doctor as having this, pretty severe actually and am taking Adderall for it now. We all know about kids being (mis)diagnosed with this back in the 80's and 90's, but was or is it a catch all for kids with too much sugar and no outlet for their energy or is it truly a problem? This has been an ongoing issue for me, resulting in broken relationships with friends over the years, a failed romantic relationship(mostly my fault due to a lack of patience) and an absolutely pathetic work record(habitual job hopper). The psychologist told me that all of these things can be attributed to the ADHD and there is no underlying psychosis, such as bipolar or such. Do you know anyone taking these meds(Adderall, Ritalin, Concerta or any other for ADHD)? Are there any "coping" strategies to deal with this alongside the prescribed medications?
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#2
I have ADD - was diagnosed about 15 years ago when I was (eeek) 30 years old.  I've never been on meds specifically for the ADD, but I've been on a couple of antidepressants that help with the symptoms (positive side effect of the meds.)  There are  therapists that specialize in adult ADD.  I can pm you a list of books if you'd like... .
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#3
First, a question: How old are you paxvobiscum23? 

Now, a bit of testimony.

I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was about 6 years old.  Mom (mostly) and Dad had trouble disciplining me.  That summer, I was being picked on EXCESSIVELY by the neighborhood kids.  Finally, when they all cornered me and dumped a bunch of water on me mixed with oil, I decided to chase the bastards (4-7 of them) with an axe.  Cornered them all in a shed, and chopped at the door till I got tired.  Good times!

Incidentally, my parents were told about it.  And soon after, I was put on Ritalin.  But it did nothing to me.  I was still without question a scourge of my elementary school and later my middle school.  I would always get into trouble, and the principle was always calling my mother.  Vandalism and theft were fun activities as I got a wee bit older.  Not much, mind you. 

I was taken the the Children's Medical Center, where I had fun talking to a psychologist there.  I liked how he picked my brain and acted "interested" in how I behaved.  In fact, it somewhat made me question myself (this was age 11 or 12, I guess).  I was put on a medicine called Tofernil, which I understand to be a bed-wetting medicine.  My peers later would tell me how it always seemed that I was totally drugged out, and that they thought I was a heavy drug user of the school.  Certainly, I sometimes would sit with that ilk.  But I was a clean straight arrow in regards to drugs. 

Finally, in my freshman year of high school, I told everyone I didn't want to take medicine anymore.  So I stopped just like that.  I noticed no change, really.  My parents kept asking me if I was okay, or if I felt like I needed the medicine again.  But I never felt addicted to it. 

Now, in hindsight, I can say that I was always able to focus on videogames or any other hobbies that would interest me.  I think that the problem of those days was that (forgive me Dad) my parents did not spend enough time with me to find outlets.  I believe that if I was involved with instruments and music, I'd be one hell of a musician right now.  I have discovered in the last year that I have an uncanny ability to pick up instruments and quickly learn how to play music on them. 

I liked drawing and writing, but the only one who seemed interested in those things was myself.  The parents really didn't delve too much into what I was doing.  They might smirk and say "way to go, son," but then they'd move on. 

The key, I believe, is to find the things that engage you, and put your energies into them.  I don't think that ADHD is real.  I think that folks just have gifts that are overlooked, and this "inattentive behavior and hyperactivity" are a result of our boredom. 
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#4
Everyone has ADD/ADHD. It's ridiculous. I was diagnosed with ADD. Listen it's all made up nonsense to sell drugs as far as I'm concerned. These synthetic chemicals are not find in nature as they are, and they just short-circuit the real physiological processes of the body. Get off the meds, people. I'd rather deal with my present anxiety then go on prozac. My suggestion: take cod liver oil with it's own natural vitamins A & D, stop eating white flour, white sugar and white milk that's pasteurized, eat grassfed meats, and read this website: www.westonaprice.org

Pray, hope and don't worry (something I have a very hard time with).

And flee the devils and evil spirits with holy water!
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#5
Oh, and take St. Dympthna as your special patron. I'll mention you in my current novena to her.
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#6
I was diagnosed with this way back when I was in elementary school. Took ritalin for several years. My doctor told me I would outgrow this. He lied. After reading an article about adult ADHD I have all the symptoms so along with all my other medical conditions I have something else wrong with me.

Oh yeah...and it's also because I took medication for ADHD was the reason I got discharged from the Air Force. So it's screwed my life up really good.

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#7
I really think ADD and ADHD is a matter of garbage in, garbage out.  There are so many pollutants, and they come in through all the senses.  Unhealthy foods lacking in essential fatty acids that nourish the brain and our nervous system.  Unhealthy mental and emotional stimulation through modern society and things like video games and television.  Lack of healthy emotional support from parents and other relatives.  It's pretty basic, garbage in, garbage out.  The drugs might help but nourishing the mind and body will get you much farther.

I highly recommend a book called "the Traveller's Gift" by Andy Andrews.  It's pop-psychology but it's still quite helpful for those of us who have been damaged by society.
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#8
(10-18-2010, 02:28 PM)miss_fluffy Wrote: ... Unhealthy mental and emotional stimulation through modern society and things like video games and television.  Lack of healthy emotional support from parents and other relatives.... 

Amen.  I'll check out the book.
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#9
My son has ADD. He tried a few of the meds but could not take them because of severe side effects, the kind that could put a person in cardiac arrest. So, he deals with it the best he can. He was not the kind of ADD kid that got in trouble. He was the daydreamer type, although very active.

In our case, we have always lived healthy. He didn't watch TV, play video games, etc. He's 24 now, and he still doesn't watch TV or play video games. Very good family life, we are a very close family, so all that kind of stuff about not having a supportive family, etc., doesn't always apply. My side of the family is riddled with behavioral disorders, though, and also mental illness and disabilities.
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#10
just find somebody to let you live off of them and thenn you dont have to worry about getting job
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