Jesuit Priest: Incense was Enemy Number One
#1
Jesuit Revolutionary: Incense Was Enemy Number 1
When the readings of the Old Testament are replaced by readings of Karl Marx. Jesuit Father Edmund Runggaldier has now brought to light background information about Jesuit Education of the 68-Generation


Munich-Innsbruck (kath.net) The Jesuit priest Edmund Runggaldier has illustrated for the benefit of the official news of the Jesuits of the German Province, the 68 Generation. Edmund Rundggaldier, the current professor at the Theological Faculty of the University of Innsbruck currently, was from 1966 to 1968, a novice in St. Andra in Austria. Then he studied philosophy in Pullach near Munich till 1970. There he experienced, according to his own report, a kind of cultural revolution and the awakening of a "delayed inner-Catholic revolution". He avowed himself that sometimes there were excesses among the Novices and Scholastic and he was fully involved. "I was an active, almost a fanatical participant in that revolution: we have formally destroyed Iconography with Nazarene Style", wrote Runggaldier.

http://eponymousflower.blogspot.com/2010...enemy.html
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#2
Was that article a translation?  Is it me or did that article read like it was a bipolar priest riddled with Attention Deficit Disorder on top?  Though I think this was one of the most insidious tactics described that I've seen displayed.  "The Jesuit professor explained then, that one encouraged the oversimplification and use of a fundamental biblical message. "What counted, was -- completely in the sense of the Reformation -- the origins, the ipsissima vox des Herrn." According to his opinion of what took place then was a philosophic approach between the Catholic students -- and Student Camps (Like Highland or Catholic Youth Camps) and the Marxism. For Runggaldier coincided extensively the roots and the driving force. "We were especially convinced by the necessity of protecting persistent renewal i.e., permanent revolution, against untruth and alienation.," he wrote in illustration."
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#3
The Jesuit professor explained then, that one encouraged the oversimplification and use of a fundamental biblical message. "What counted, was -- completely in the sense of the Reformation -- the origins, the ipsissima vox des Herrn." According to his opinion of what took place then was a philosophic approach between the Catholic students -- and Student Camps (Like Highland or Catholic Youth Camps) and the Marxism. For Runggaldier combined extensively the roots and the driving force.  "We were especially convinced by the necessity of protecting persistent renewal i.e., permanent revolution, against untruth and alienation.," he wrote in illustration.


Yes, this is a translation, the priest is writing about his experiences as a student and then a professor of the Generation 68 Marxists, another confirmation about the Marxist infiltration of the Church, especially of the Jesuits.

The emboldened sentence  should not be in quotes, that's the author speaking, describing the Jesuit's approach.

One of the changes I made, was to change the word, coincided with combined, to make it more clear about roots and driving forces as part of his Marxist parlance.

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