Winter Soup Recipes
#41
(11-10-2010, 07:58 AM)MaterLaeta Wrote: I get to be the dessert cook!  What do you think Tex? 

NO!  We'd go broke, cause I'd eat everything and we'd have nothing left to sell...  :eats:
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#42
This is what we've been eating lately: Vegetable, (what-all you like or what-all you've got on hand)... Soup.

~Boil 'em up in a big pot. You really need a lot of what-all you've got. Sort of fill the pot. And you really need onions, celery and carrots, too.

~Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add bouillon cubes.

~Let it cool. Take veggies out and puree them.

~Put the pureed veggies back into the liquid.

~Add butter, Worcestershire sauce and dry white wine to taste. If you like it "creamed", then add some milk now at the end of the cooking time. Just don't let the soup be too hot when you add the milk.

"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#43
The soup I made for lunch to take to work this weekend (I had Thanksgiving dinner at friends, so no left overs, they even ate all the deviled eggs I brought, but the prime rib was superb  ;D).

Three cups barley (soak over night)
Three cups lentils
36 ounces beef (I used three 12 ounce cans of Kirkland Roast Beef in Beef Broth).  I started out with two cans, but decided to throw in a third.  If I had planned ahead it would have been cheaper to get a pot roast on sale and cook it ahead, to add to the soup.
One sweet onion chopped up fine.
One bunch clery chopped up fine.
Salt, pepper, garlic granules, cumin, Worchestershire sauce, to taste.
Add bay leaves during cooking.

In the crock pot, with 6 cups water to start.  I added another 4 cups later.  It's been simmering on high for about 6 hours and is tasting mighty fine.  I'll put it on low for the night and probable add a little more water.
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#44
Here is a Pumpkin Soup recipe that I cobbled together out of a couple of different ideas.  I have gotten great compliments on this.

Here it is:

4 TBSP Butter
1 Large, sweet onion, chopped
3 Large Fuji apples – peeled, sliced and oven roasted @ 350 in a
little oil until tender & juicy
8 Cups chicken stock
2 heaping TBSP freshly grated ginger
4 Cups fresh pumpkin puree
1&1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/8 tsp mace (or ¼ tsp nutmeg)
1/8 tsp ground cardamom
Salt to taste


1) Cook onions in 6 qt. Dutch oven in butter over med-low heat until caramelized and very sweet. (about ½ hour)  Stir often.

2) Roast apples in 375 degree oven until tender & juicy.
May take up to an hour, depending on the apples.

3) Put pot with onions over med –high heat.  Add fresh ginger.  Cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes.  Add other spices and cook 1 minute more.

4) Add all broth, 4 cups pumpkin, apples & any juice.  Bring to a boil & reduce heat to simmer.  Cover & cook over low heat, stirring every 5 min, for about 40 minutes.


5) Puree in small batches in blender.  Return to pan & add salt to taste.  Heat through & serve.
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#45
(12-03-2010, 06:11 PM)MaterLaeta Wrote: Here is a Pumpkin Soup recipe that I cobbled together out of a couple of different ideas.  I have gotten great compliments on this.

That sounds absolutely delicious, I’m going to have to try it, especially since apples are so plentiful here in Washington State (anything with apples or potatoes is a state staple).

(12-03-2010, 06:11 PM)MaterLaeta Wrote: 5) Puree in small batches in blender.  Return to pan & add salt to taste.  Heat through & serve.

Excellent advice!  Trying a new recipe I went to puree the soup in my blender.  Without knowing any better (or thinking about it) I filled the blender nearly full and turned it on.  The heat from the soup “softened” the rubberized top enough that the raised round plastic piece in the center of the top (a handle for the top) fell in and got pureed into the soup also, and it seemed prudent to have to pour it all out into the compost bin  :realmad:.

Now I only fill the blender half full while pureeing a hot soup.
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#46
I like to make a lot of pureed soups, so it is worth having a hand (immersion) blender.  Instead of blending in batches, the blender goes right into the soup pot and does it all at once.  It is faster and less messy.  The hand blender is also good for making individual smoothies or protein shakes.  Reasonable quality hand blenders can be bought for under $50.
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#47
(12-03-2010, 07:50 PM)JayneK Wrote: Reasonable quality hand blenders can be bought for under $50.

or for free if you can move yur fingers really fast!!
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#48
(12-03-2010, 07:50 PM)JayneK Wrote: I like to make a lot of pureed soups, so it is worth having a hand (immersion) blender.  Instead of blending in batches, the blender goes right into the soup pot and does it all at once.  It is faster and less messy.  The hand blender is also good for making individual smoothies or protein shakes.  Reasonable quality hand blenders can be bought for under $50.

I didn’t know about those.  Great idea for my Christmas list (a family required tradition, and I usually get a Bed, Bath & Beyond gift card from my mother anyway, as she thinks my house is lacking ;D).  Thanks for the suggestion  :thumb:


(12-03-2010, 11:22 PM)icecream Wrote:
(12-03-2010, 07:50 PM)JayneK Wrote: Reasonable quality hand blenders can be bought for under $50.

or for free if you can move yur fingers really fast!!

My fingers are fast enough, but def not sharp enough for some of the soups I make.
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#49
(12-04-2010, 12:32 AM)moneil Wrote:
(12-03-2010, 07:50 PM)JayneK Wrote: I like to make a lot of pureed soups, so it is worth having a hand (immersion) blender.  Instead of blending in batches, the blender goes right into the soup pot and does it all at once.  It is faster and less messy.  The hand blender is also good for making individual smoothies or protein shakes.  Reasonable quality hand blenders can be bought for under $50.

I didn’t know about those.  Great idea for my Christmas list (a family required tradition, and I usually get a Bed, Bath & Beyond gift card from my mother anyway, as she thinks my house is lacking ;D).  Thanks for the suggestion  :thumb:


(12-03-2010, 11:22 PM)icecream Wrote:
(12-03-2010, 07:50 PM)JayneK Wrote: Reasonable quality hand blenders can be bought for under $50.

or for free if you can move yur fingers really fast!!

My fingers are fast enough, but def not sharp enough for some of the soups I make.

get these:  http://www.fadedtribune.com/2009/12/meet...sor-hands/

[Image: real-life-edward-scissorhands.jpg]
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#50
(12-04-2010, 12:32 AM)moneil Wrote:
(12-03-2010, 07:50 PM)JayneK Wrote: I like to make a lot of pureed soups, so it is worth having a hand (immersion) blender.  Instead of blending in batches, the blender goes right into the soup pot and does it all at once.  It is faster and less messy.  The hand blender is also good for making individual smoothies or protein shakes.  Reasonable quality hand blenders can be bought for under $50.

I didn’t know about those.  Great idea for my Christmas list (a family required tradition, and I usually get a Bed, Bath & Beyond gift card from my mother anyway, as she thinks my house is lacking ;D).  Thanks for the suggestion  :thumb:

I'm glad it was a helpful idea for someone.  I was a bit afraid I was going to be accused of being a modernist.  ;D
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