The Mass as a Sacrifice and the Mass as a Meal
#1
We know that the Mass is validly seen as both a Sacrifice (the making-present of Calvary) and a meal.  I have heard the argument made that while the Novus Ordo rite does shift the emphasis slightly from sacrifice to meal, this is entirely valid because the Mass indeed is both (Eucharist does mean "thanksgiving", of course, after all).

Can someone point me to any references from councils or popes stating that actually the Mass is primarily the Sacrifice and that this aspect is more important than the meal aspect and should be emphasized as such?
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#2
:safe:
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#3
The XIX Ecumenical council defined that the Mass has multiple ends;

Chap. 2. The Reason for the Institution of this
Most Holy Sacrament


875 Our Savior, therefore, when about to depart from this world to the
Father, instituted this sacrament in which He poured forth, as it were,
the riches of His divine love for men, "making a remembrance of his
wonderful works" [Ps. 110:4], and He commanded us in the consuming of
it to cherish His "memory" [1 Cor. 11:24], and "to show forth his death
until He come" to judge the world [1 Cor. 11:23]. But He wished that
this sacrament be received as the spiritual food of souls [Matt.
26:26], by which they may be nourished and strengthened [can. 5],
living by the life of Him who said: "He who eateth me, the same also
shall live by me" [John 6:58], and as an antidote, whereby we may be
freed from daily faults and be preserved from mortal sins. He wished,
furthermore, that this be a pledge of our future glory and of
everlasting happiness, and thus be a symbol of that one "body" of which
He Himself is the "head"
[1 Cor. 11:23; Eph. 5:23], and to which He
wished us to be united, as members, by the closest bond of faith, hope,
and charity, that we might "all speak the same thing and there might be
no schisms among us" [cf. 1 Cor. 1:10].

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#4
(10-16-2010, 10:08 AM)MaterLaeta Wrote: :safe:

You could take your laptop under the chair and google this question for me.
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#5
(10-16-2010, 10:07 AM)The Catholic Thinker Wrote: We know that the Mass is validly seen as both a Sacrifice (the making-present of Calvary) and a meal.  I have heard the argument made that while the Novus Ordo rite does shift the emphasis slightly from sacrifice to meal, this is entirely valid because the Mass indeed is both (Eucharist does mean "thanksgiving", of course, after all).

If it only shifted the emphasis "slightly", that might be true.
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#6
(10-16-2010, 10:07 AM)The Catholic Thinker Wrote: We know that the Mass is validly seen as both a Sacrifice (the making-present of Calvary) and a meal.  I have heard the argument made that while the Novus Ordo rite does shift the emphasis slightly from sacrifice to meal, this is entirely valid because the Mass indeed is both (Eucharist does mean "thanksgiving", of course, after all).

Can someone point me to any references from councils or popes stating that actually the Mass is primarily the Sacrifice and that this aspect is more important than the meal aspect and should be emphasized as such?

The Council of Trent states the Mass is a Sacrifice:

Quote:CHAPTER I.
On the institution of the most holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

CHAPTER II.
That the Sacrifice of the Mass is propitiatory both for the living and the dead.


ON THE SACRIFICE OF THE MASS.

CANON I.--If any one saith, that in the mass a true and proper sacriflce is not offered to God; or, that to be offered is nothing else but that Christ is given us to eat; let him be anathema.

http://history.hanover.edu/texts/trent/ct22.html

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#7
Of course the Mass is a Sacrifice.  That doesn't answer the question.
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#8
The NO does recreate the Last Supper.  I never hear mention of Simon of Cyrene or Golgotha during Mass except on Good Friday.
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#9
(10-16-2010, 01:10 PM)dark lancer Wrote: The NO does recreate the Last Supper.  I never hear mention of Simon of Cyrene or Golgotha during Mass except on Good Friday.

Also unrelated to the question.

Thanks, but actually I know quite a bit about the Mass (both Latin rites in current use).  What I am interested in is what I asked - are there any official Church statements proclaiming that the sacrificial nature of the Mass is primary, and more important than its nature as a meal?  I don't recall ever seeing any (and I'm hoping they exist).

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#10
(10-16-2010, 01:52 PM)The Catholic Thinker Wrote:
(10-16-2010, 01:10 PM)dark lancer Wrote: The NO does recreate the Last Supper.  I never hear mention of Simon of Cyrene or Golgotha during Mass except on Good Friday.


Also unrelated to the question.

Thanks, but actually I know quite a bit about the Mass (both Latin rites in current use).  What I am interested in is what I asked - are there any official Church statements proclaiming that the sacrificial nature of the Mass is primary, and more important than its nature as a meal?  I don't recall ever seeing any (and I'm hoping they exist).


Can't imagine finding the exact sentence you seek in an official Church statement.

The Canon from Trent: If any one saith, that in the mass a true and proper sacriflce is not offered to God; or, that to be offered is nothing else but that Christ is given us to eat; let him be anathema. does say what you are seeking......1) The Mass is a Sacrifice and 2) it is more than just a meal.



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