Was Jesus perfect in his human deeds?
#41
I'll try to dig it up. I read it some years ago.

In which Gospel is that passage? Luke?
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#42
Here are the passages and my take on Lagrange's treatment of them, which, as I said, seems insufficient.


• In regards to proclaiming an imminent Judgment Day:
Matthew 24:34 – “Amen, I say to you, this generation will not pass away until all these things have taken place.”
Matthew 16:28 – “Amen, I say to you, there are some standing here who will not taste death until they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom."

These passages seem to show an error in Christ’s intellect for certainly all those to whom Christ is literally speaking have died without seeing the Judgment Day.  Garrigou-Lagrange answers this in Chapter XI, Question 9, Article 2.  He treats the passages as most likely speaking of separate events.  Matthew 16:28, Garrigou-Lagrange says, is most likely alluding to the resurrection of Christ and thus there is no error in Christ’s words.  While the words, “Son of man coming in his kingdom,” do seem quite indicative of Christ’s resurrection and establishment of His kingdom in the Church, one must look at the verse before this one in which Christ says, “For the Son of Man will come with his angels in his Father's glory, and then he will repay everyone according to his conduct.”  The latter part of this verse, in which the event that is being spoken of is Christ rendering to “every man according to his works,” seems to imply an eschatological and apocalyptic Christ and thus it seems as if this verse refers not to Christ’s resurrection but to his Second Coming and the Judgment Day.  And it does seem that there is not a distinction between verses 16 and 17, so that whatever event is being spoken of in 16 is the event being spoken of in 17, for which Christ says that some of those present will live to see.  Thus, it can be said that the most logical interpretation of this passage and the trouble that it presents to theologians (namely, that Christ erred in predicting the Judgment Day) is not sufficiently answered by Lagrange in this text.  Perhaps Lagrange did see either verse 16 as not implying the Judgment Day, but the resurrection as well, or, he saw two distinct events being spoken about in these last two verses of chapter 16.  Both of these speculations, however, are not mentioned in Lagrange’s treatment of this passage and thus nothing can be said of it.  Matt. 24:34 poses the same problem and cannot be explained as Christ referring to his resurrection as opposed to the Judgment Day.  Lagrange even states about this passage, “Scripture on this subject are indeed difficult to reconcile, for in this same discourse Christ spoke of both the end of Jerusalem and the end of the world, and although the first event is a figure of the second, it is difficult to detect what belongs to the first event, and what to the second.”    He gives cursory mention of Christ’s command to preach the gospel to all nations and to the fact that it seems, as in Mark 13:10, that the gospel will be preached to all nations before the Judgment Day.  “When you hear of wars and reports of wars do not be alarmed; such things must happen, but it will not yet be the end.  Nation will rise against nation and kingdom against kingdom. There will be earthquakes from place to place and there will be famines….But the gospel must first be preached to all nations.”  While this particular passage does seem to show Christ saying that the whole world must be preached to before the time of the Judgment Day, it does not say how quickly or slowly Christ saw that happening.  Even if this event is one which would take some time, as it seems that it would and has taken some time, it still does not reconcile the two passages above which seem to show Christ speaking of the Judgment as being quite close at hand.  Though St. Thomas and Lagrange’s theological arguments for their theory of the knowledge of Christ are largely internally sound, these passages have not been sufficiently answered or reconciled with their theory in this text.
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#43
Ok, this is Haydock's commentary for these passages. Probably you know it already:

Matthew 16:28

Till they see the Son of man coming in his kingdom. Some expound this, as fulfilled at his transfiguration, which follows in the next chapter. Others understand it of the glory of Christ, and of his Church, after his resurrection and ascension, when he should be owned for Redeemer of the world: and this state of the Christian Church might be called the kingdom of Christ. (Witham) --- This promise of a transitory view of his glory he makes, to prove that he should one day come in all the glory of his Father, to judge each man according to his works: not according to his mercy, or their faith, but according to their works. (St. Augustine, de verb. apos. serm. 35.) --- Again, asks St. Augustine, how could our Saviour reward every one according to his works, if there were no free will? (lib. ii. chap. 4. 5. 8, de act. cum Fœlic. Manich.) (Bristow)

Matthew 24:34

This generation; i.e. the nation of the Jews shall not cease to exist, until all these things shall be accomplished: thus we see the nation of the Jews still continue, and will certainly continue to the end of the world. (Tirinus) --- Then the cross, which has been a scandal to the Jew, and a stumbling-block to the Gentile, shall appear in the heavens, for the consolation of the good Christian. "Hoc signum crucis erit in cœlo, cum Dominus ad judicandum venerit." --- If it be to be understood of the destruction of Jerusalem, the sense may be, this race of men now living; if of the last day of judgment, this generation of the faithful, saith Theophylactus,[4] shall be continued: i.e. the Church of Christ, to the end of the world. (Witham) --- This race, I tell you in very truth, shall not pass away till all this be finally accomplished in the ruin of Jerusalem, the most express figure of the destruction and end of the world. (Bible de Vence) --- By generation, our Saviour does not mean the people that were in existence at that time, but the faithful of his Church; thus says the psalmist: this is the generation of them that seek the Lord. (Psalm xxiii, ver. 6.) (St. Chrysostom, hom. lxxvii.)
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#44
This is Lapide's commentary on Matthew 16:28. The idea is that Christ meant His Transfiguration by "the Son of Man coming in His Kingdom." And "the Kingdom" is the Church as well. So there's more than one meaning.

Quote:Verily I say unto you, &c., in His kingdom. Syriac, into His kingdom. Christ promised that a reward in the heavenly kingdom should be given for good works of self-denial and the cross. Now, lest any one should find fault that it was to be put off for many ages, He shows that it was in reality near; He shows that very kingdom in the transfiguration, after a few days, to some yet alive.

Shall not taste of death, i.e., shall not die. It is a metaphor taken from the deadly cup which was given to persons condemned to die.

In His Kingdom. You will ask what was this kingdom of Christ; and when some of the Apostles standing there beheld it? S. Gregory answers (Hom. 32, in Evang.), and Bede, that this kingdom of Christ was the Church, and its diffusion throughout all nations, which verily the Apostles beheld, yea, brought about. Christ says this, says S. Gregory, that from the spread of the Church’s kingdom, which they were about to behold, they might learn how great would be their future glory in the heavenly kingdom, which in this life is invisible. For God, by the visible things, which He sets forth, confirms the hope of the invisible promises. And, 2. Some think that it was to take place at the resurrection, and in the day of judgment, of which Christ spake in the preceding verse. But I say it took place in the Transfiguration of Christ. For in it they beheld Christ’s glorious kingdom as in a glass. Three of the Apostles, namely, Peter, James, and John, had a foretaste of this kingdom. This view is plain from what follows. All the three Evangelists who relate the Transfiguration, place it immediately after this promise, as though it were the fulfilment of it. Thus SS. Hilary, Chrysostom, Jerome, Ambrose, Theophylact, and others, passim. Whence S. Leo says (de Transfig.). In the kingdom, that is in royal splendour. For in His Transfiguration Christ gave to His Apostles a specimen of the glory, the joy and the happiness which the Saints shall obtain in the Heavenly Kingdom, that He might thereby animate them to Evangelical labours and sorrows, and that they might animate others to the same. After the same manner S. Jerome animates Eustochium. “Go forth,” he saith, “for a little space from thy prison, and picture to thine eyes the reward of thy present labours, which eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither hath it entered into the heart of man. What sort of day will that be when Mary the mother of the Lord shall meet thee with choirs of virgins? When after Pharaoh with his host has been drowned in the Red Sea, she shall sing the antiphon to the responsive choirs, as she bears the timbrel. Let us sing to the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously; the horse and his rider hath He thrown into the sea. Then shall Thecla joyfully fly to embrace thee. Then too the Spouse Himself shall meet thee, and shall say, Arise and come, My kinswoman, and My fair one, for lo the winter is passed, the rain is over. Then the angels shall wonder and say, who is this that looketh forth as the morning, beautiful as the moon, chosen as the sun? Then the little ones, lifting up the palms of victory, shall sing with concordant voice, ‘Hosanna in the Highest! Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the Highest!’ Then the hundred and forty and four thousand before the Throne, and before the Elders shall hold their harps, and shall chant the new song.”
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#45
The same Lapide on Matthew 24:34:

Quote:Verily I say, &c. This generation, that is to say, 1. of all men, or this age, which shall last until the end of the world. So S. Jerome. As though Christ had said, “Before the end of the world all these things shall come to pass.”

2. Origen, Hilary, and Chrysostom take generation in a more restricted sense, to mean the generation of believers of Christians, that were now sprung from Christ, to whom Christ was speaking in the person of His Apostles, according to the words in Ps. xxiv. 6, “This is the generation of them that seek the Lord.” As though the Lord had said, “The Christian religion which I have instituted shall not come to an end until Christians, who faithfully serve Me, are rewarded by and crowned in the Day of Judgment.”
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#46
(11-25-2010, 07:56 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: The same Lapide on Matthew 24:34:

Quote:Verily I say, &c. This generation, that is to say, 1. of all men, or this age, which shall last until the end of the world. So S. Jerome. As though Christ had said, “Before the end of the world all these things shall come to pass.”

2. Origen, Hilary, and Chrysostom take generation in a more restricted sense, to mean the generation of believers of Christians, that were now sprung from Christ, to whom Christ was speaking in the person of His Apostles, according to the words in Ps. xxiv. 6, “This is the generation of them that seek the Lord.” As though the Lord had said, “The Christian religion which I have instituted shall not come to an end until Christians, who faithfully serve Me, are rewarded by and crowned in the Day of Judgment.”

This seems like the better explanation to me.  For example, if you look at verse Matt. 16:27 it states, "For the Son of Man will come with his angels in his Father's glory, and then he will repay everyone according to his conduct."

I just don't understand how Haydock could think that this is about the Transfiguration, the Resurrection, Ascension, or the institution of the Church.
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