The purpose of life
#1
As a die hard hard far-right kind of guy, the following facebook quote really pissed me off. Can someone tell me if this is true or false to a Catholic perspective?


"The purpose of life is to help other people. Give and give to others until you think you can't give anymore, and even then don't stop giving. That's why God put you on this earth."
- Dad
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#2
Well I have certainly given a few knucklesandwhiches in me tome.
Chewed. Few too
give and let give ah dad?
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#3
(10-21-2010, 12:08 PM)randomtradguy Wrote: As a die hard hard far-right kind of guy, the following facebook quote really pissed me off. Can someone tell me if this is true or false to a Catholic perspective?

"The purpose of life is to help other people. Give and give to others until you think you can't give anymore, and even then don't stop giving. That's why God put you on this earth."
- Dad

Well, it depends on the context (or lack of it).

To love one's neighbour is a commandment from God, so you could interpret that quote favourably in that respect. However, he says that the "purpose of life" is to love one's neighbour and that is a problem, given that loving God is the greatest commandment of all, without which everyhting else falls apart. If you don't love, worship, serve and give glory to God in your life, then you miss the purpose of it. Loving one's neighbour but forgetting to love God who is the sole responsible for the fact that you and the neighbour even exist in the first place, is short-sighted, unfair and ungrateful.
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#4

Oh you're lucky if that's all that ticked you off on FB. I got all kinds of purple propaganda on mine for the big day yesterday that had me irritated.

That quote is false to a Catholic perspective for all the reasons Vetus described. Altruism is a virtue yes, but one among many and certainly does not qualify as the purpose of life. But I bet if you were to try and explain it, that person would think you're a hater advocating that we not help our neighbors.   

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#5
The purpose in life is to know, love and serve God. But in doing so, we will also serve and love others made in God's image. Jesus' entire sermon on the mount, in fact the entire message of his public life, was love of God and love of neighbor. The two go hand-in-hand (that is to say one is the outcome of the other).
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#6
(10-21-2010, 02:54 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: The two go hand-in-hand (that is to say one is the outcome of the other).

That is certainly true but let's not forget that the first commandment is towards God, not men.

The quote that disturbed randomtradguy seems to limit life's pupose to philanthropy, ignoring the supernatural origin and end of man, which is a grave error.
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#7
Quote: As a die hard hard far-right kind of guy, the following facebook quote really pissed me off. Can someone tell me if this is true or false to a Catholic perspective?
From a Catholic perspective it is false, because it is an exaggeration. 

Quote: And God blessed them, saying: Increase and multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it, and rule over the fishes of the sea, and the fowls of the air, and all living creatures that move upon the earth.
  Looks like we are to exploit the Earth and maximize profits.  ;D
(Yes, this is an exaggeration, that is my point).
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#8
This goes to the notion that philanthropy is what Jesus' message is. I know progressive Catholics none of them are fisheaters. They ignore or tend to ignore what Jesus said to the Pharisees and the order in which it was said, and where he later explained clearly what brotherly love entails. First he told them the First Commandment is to love the Lord God with all our hearts, strength and minds, and the second is to love your neighbor as yourself. They then jump immediately to the Sermon on the Mount skipping the first, and more importantly concerning the second ignore what he said about that love. He said we should love them as He loved us. This means to lay down our lives for others which is the no greater love, and that it is not fuzzy lovey dovey it is in fact an act of will. You can be madder than a wet hen at someone but if you step into the breach and give up your life for him, it is the ultimate love.
When my aunt died who was a Greek Orthodox in DC, they had her funeral in a Greek Orthodox Church, there. Her sons brought her back to Chicago for burial and had a Mass for her here before burial. They are Catholics, and the Priest that celebrated the Mass used the Sermon on the Mount as the Gospel reading, and everyone sang kumbyah and wore birkenstocks.Now I don't know what the proper Gospel is for a N O Mass for the dead, but the Sermon on the Mount ? My aunt who was a Democrat but a tough old bird would have looked at them all and she would have shook her head, and if some one tried defend it she would have blasted them with her Greek Orthodox angry tongue with her smile intact.
tim
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#9
(10-21-2010, 03:05 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(10-21-2010, 02:54 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: The two go hand-in-hand (that is to say one is the outcome of the other).

That is certainly true but let's not forget that the first commandment is towards God, not men.

The quote that disturbed randomtradguy seems to limit life's pupose to philanthropy, ignoring the supernatural origin and end of man, which is a grave error.

Vetus hit the nail right on the head. I guess that's what made me mad. I get frustrated with liberals who tell me I owe them something, like how socialism works. It sounded socialist to me. Thanks for letting me vent.
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#10
If I ask someone why they sleep so they wash, why they dress, etc., they will respond with appropriate answers to these common needs of all people. Many people live their lives without ever reflecting on life itself or its meaning for them. Their lives may be full of activities. They may marry, have children, run a business, or become scientists or musicians, without ever any degree of understanding of why they do these things. Their lives have no overall purpose to give meaning to separate events, and they may have no clear idea of their own nature or identity of who they really are.
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