"Watching" recommended by the Cathechism of the Council of Trent
#1
In discussing the sixth petition of the Lord's Prayer "And lead us not into temptation", the Cathechism of the Council of Trent states:

"Satan, however, is overcome not by indolence, sleep, wine, revelling, or lust; but by prayer, labor, watching, fasting, continence and chastity. Watch ye and pray, that ye enter not into temptation, as we have already said, is the admonition of our Lord. They who make use of these weapons in the conflict put the enemy to flight; for the devil flees from those who resist him."

I've never really thought of "watching" as being distinct from "prayer". But is it?

The closing section on the sixth commandment "Thou shalt not commit adultery" also mentions "watching":

"But the body is to be mortified and the sensual appetites to be repressed not only by fasting, and particularly, by the fasts instituted by the Church, but also by watching, pious pilgrimages, and other works of austerity. By these and similar observances is the virtue of temperance chiefly manifested. In connection with this subject, St. Paul, writing to the Corinthians, says: Every one that striveth for the mastery, refraineth himself from all things; and they indeed that they may receive a corruptible crown, but we an incorruptible one. A little after he says: I chastise my body and bring it into subjection, lest, perhaps, when I have preached to others, I myself should become a castaway. And in another place he says: Make not provision for the flesh in its concupiscence."

In this case, watching is mentioned alongside fasting.

So does "watching" always means "watch and pray" or can it be a form of abstinence from sleep of something like that? Or is, say, Eucharistic Adoration also a form of "watching"?
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#2
(10-25-2010, 12:45 AM)Bakuryokuso Wrote: In discussing the sixth petition of the Lord's Prayer "And lead us not into temptation", the Cathechism of the Council of Trent states:

"Satan, however, is overcome not by indolence, sleep, wine, revelling, or lust; but by prayer, labor, watching, fasting, continence and chastity. Watch ye and pray, that ye enter not into temptation, as we have already said, is the admonition of our Lord. They who make use of these weapons in the conflict put the enemy to flight; for the devil flees from those who resist him."

I've never really thought of "watching" as being distinct from "prayer". But is it?

The closing section on the sixth commandment "Thou shalt not commit adultery" also mentions "watching":

"But the body is to be mortified and the sensual appetites to be repressed not only by fasting, and particularly, by the fasts instituted by the Church, but also by watching, pious pilgrimages, and other works of austerity. By these and similar observances is the virtue of temperance chiefly manifested. In connection with this subject, St. Paul, writing to the Corinthians, says: Every one that striveth for the mastery, refraineth himself from all things; and they indeed that they may receive a corruptible crown, but we an incorruptible one. A little after he says: I chastise my body and bring it into subjection, lest, perhaps, when I have preached to others, I myself should become a castaway. And in another place he says: Make not provision for the flesh in its concupiscence."

In this case, watching is mentioned alongside fasting.

So does "watching" always means "watch and pray" or can it be a form of abstinence from sleep of something like that? Or is, say, Eucharistic Adoration also a form of "watching"?

I think watching refers to all-night prayer vigils.
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#3
Cool - thanks!
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#4
Bakuryokuso, as far as I know, this idea of "watchfulness" was only ever developed explicitly in the East. For information try googling "nepsis" (or "nipsis").

"Close the door of your cell to the body, the door of your tongue to speech, and your inner gate to evil spirits. Ascend into a watchtower -- if you know how to -- and observe how and when and whence, and in what numbers and what form, the robbers try to break in and steal your grapes. When the watchman grows weary he stands up and prays; then he sits down again and manfully resumes the same task. Guarding against evil thoughts is one thing, keeping watch over the spirit [nous] is another. The latter differs from the former as much as east from west, and is far more difficult to attain. Where thieves see royal weapons at the ready they do not attack the palace lightly. Similarly, spiritual robbers do not lightly try to plunder the person who has enshrined prayer within his heart."

~ The Ladder of Divine Ascent, St. John Climacus
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#5
(10-28-2010, 12:22 AM)Marc Wrote: Bakuryokuso, as far as I know, this idea of "watchfulness" was only ever developed explicitly in the East. For information try googling "nepsis" (or "nipsis").

"Close the door of your cell to the body, the door of your tongue to speech, and your inner gate to evil spirits. Ascend into a watchtower -- if you know how to -- and observe how and when and whence, and in what numbers and what form, the robbers try to break in and steal your grapes. When the watchman grows weary he stands up and prays; then he sits down again and manfully resumes the same task. Guarding against evil thoughts is one thing, keeping watch over the spirit [nous] is another. The latter differs from the former as much as east from west, and is far more difficult to attain. Where thieves see royal weapons at the ready they do not attack the palace lightly. Similarly, spiritual robbers do not lightly try to plunder the person who has enshrined prayer within his heart."

~ The Ladder of Divine Ascent, St. John Climacus

Thanks! Fascinating. Here's hoping for reunion between East and West in our lifetimes!
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#6
Philokalia, anyone?  :)
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