The name of God, Can Catholics pray to Elohim or Yahweh?
#1
This is rather weird

The ex president of Argentina died yesterday (he was the real president in the shadows, his wife dominated by him is the actual president)

He was guilty for legalizing and supporting gay marriage in Argentina only a few months ago

His death put me into the mood of praising God and reading psalms, when reading the old testament I was wondering if it is fine for Catholics to refer to God in prayers not only as "God" or "Jesuschrist" but also as the old testament names like Elohim or Yahweh?

And anybody knows some article about what the old testament names of God mean and why we have so many?
Reply
#2
(10-28-2010, 05:51 PM)justlurking Wrote:No, he was half swiss, half croat

But he does come from a family of people dedicated to usury

I see.

He was a die-hard socialist though, another by-product of the post-colonial "liberated" Latin America.
Reply
#3
Not really a socialist, he was a croony-capitalist

His government was about supporting large companies, against middle size companies, and subsidizing the poor


The alliance of classes that supported him was made of  "large companies", college leftists who woud get employed by the state (sociologists, journalists) and poor people who don't work and live because of free stuff they get from the state, like people who live in the USA from stamps

The social class that hated kirchner was the middle class (both rural and urban)

For example in 2008 there was a great revolt of farmers because he increased the export-taxes to 40%, that would have ruined the middle size and small farmers, but the large farmers would have been unaffected because they can absorb the impact better, and once the middle and small size farmers have to go out of business, the large farmers can buy their lands
Reply
#4
Horrid couple, nonetheless.

Argentina deserved better. There's an interesting article about his passing away in a renowned spanish-speaking traditional catholic blog. It's called "the death of an impious" ("la muerte de un impío"): http://radiocristiandad.wordpress.com/20...-un-impio/
Reply
#5
He was truly a perverse man, and his wife is not a very bright woman.

He put his wife as president, because his idea was, 4 years for me, then 4 years for her (with me ruling in the shadows), then 4 years for me

His wife was just a tool for violating the constituion that allows only 2 consecutive terms

Perhaps God saved us from him doing more harm to Argentina, but I still wish he had been sent to prison
Reply
#6
You live in Argentina, justlurking?
Reply
#7
Yes, the "strongman" of the country died, his not very bright addict to pills wife is the president. I hope God will save us even if we only deserve punishment
Reply
#8
I reckon that the SSPX in Argentina has a good following, comparing to other countries. Their south-american seminary is in La Reja.

Have you ever been there?
Reply
#9
(10-28-2010, 05:23 PM)justlurking Wrote: His death put me into the mood of praising God and reading psalms, when reading the old testament I was wondering if it is fine for Catholics to refer to God in prayers not only as "God" or "Jesuschrist" but also as the old testament names like Elohim or Yahweh?
Jesus Christ is not one word. It is a Anglicanised form of the Greek translation of the Hebrew.

Yes, one can always use text as written. However, one should use approved translations if one isn't praying in the Hebrew. Most of the time, these names are translated.

Quote:And anybody knows some article about what the old testament names of God mean and why we have so many?
We do not have many. God is One.

The words for "God" are derived mostly from languages. The words are adopted, not given to us by God.

So, "God", "El", "Elohim", "Deus", "Theos", etc are linguistically derived.

El is the Semitic word (in Hebrew) for the word "god". It can be used just like the English word "god". It is not a name of God. To use it is to just not translate one word.

Elohim is a plural form of a word meaning "god" also (related to El, but not the exact plural of the word "El"). It is used in the singular, although it is plural, in the Hebrew scriptures.

Yahweh is the modern form/translation of the Hebrew (in modern letters, not the original Hebrew) יהוה

Its meaning and origin is uncertain. It is pronounced "Adonai" (meaning "Lord") in Hebrew (it is four consonants in a row). It is a personal name of God, and as such it is not linguistically derived. It is untranslatable, however, it would be slightly foolish to think that the series of consonants is an objective name of God. In the Greek and Latin, it is translated as "Lord" usually.

It is most likely derived a Semitic word for "being", as the existence of God can not be expressed in a way other than "God is".

From Exodus 3:14:

dixit Deus ad Mosen ego sum qui sum

καὶ εἶπεν ὁ θεὸς πρὸς Μωυσῆν ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ ὤν

God said to Moses: I AM WHO AM

רמאיו היהא רשא היהא השמ-לא םיהלא רמאיו

The bolded sections are the translations of each other. They are not exact, for those who can read them will note there are minor differences in how they are translated. In particular, the Greek means more like "I am the Being". The Hebrew verb is significantly different from the Indo-European verb and can be understood in different ways, but all express that God IS, not that God was created, or will ever cease to be.

We express God's name because of our limitations, but to truly experience God is non-communicable.

So, there is no benefit from refraining from translating the Hebrew; they are words to be understood, not to be used like magic phrases.

EDIT: The Hebrew texts looks messed up to me...if you do not know how to read it, please do not take whatever you see on your screen as correct. The bold phrase is correct although it may not be readable.
Reply
#10
It wasn't that long ago HHPope Benedict XVI warned us not use the word Yaweh in hymns.
tim
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)