The name of God, Can Catholics pray to Elohim or Yahweh?
#11
(10-29-2010, 08:45 PM)timoose Wrote: It wasn't that long ago HHPope Benedict XVI warned us not use the word Yaweh in hymns.
tim

I didn't know that

I just googled this

"By directive of the Holy Father, in accord with the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, this congregation ... deems it convenient to communicate to the bishops' conferences ... as regards the translation and the pronunciation, in a liturgical setting, of the divine name signified in the sacred Tetragrammaton," said the letter signed by Cardinal Francis Arinze and Archbishop Malcolm Ranjith, congregation prefect and secretary, respectively.

The Tetragrammaton is YHWH, the four consonants of the ancient Hebrew name for God.

"As an expression of the infinite greatness and majesty of God, it was held to be unpronounceable and hence was replaced during the reading of sacred Scripture by means of the use of an alternate name: 'Adonai,' which means 'Lord,'" the Vatican letter said. Similarly, Greek translations of the Bible used the word "Kyrios" and Latin scholars translated it to "Dominus"; both also mean Lord.

"Avoiding pronouncing the Tetragrammaton of the name of God on the part of the church has therefore its own grounds," the letter said. "Apart from a motive of a purely philological order, there is also that of remaining faithful to the church's tradition, from the beginning, that the sacred Tetragrammaton was never pronounced in the Christian context nor translated into any of the languages into which the Bible was translated."

The two Vatican officials noted that "Liturgiam Authenticam," the congregation's 2001 document on liturgical translations, stated that "the name of almighty God expressed by the Hebrew Tetragrammaton and rendered in Latin by the word 'Dominus,' is to be rendered into any given vernacular by a word equivalent in meaning."

"Notwithstanding such a clear norm, in recent years the practice has crept in of pronouncing the God of Israel's proper name," the letter said. "The practice of vocalizing it is met with both in the reading of biblical texts taken from the Lectionary as well as in prayers and hymns, and it occurs in diverse written and spoken forms," including Yahweh, Jahweh and Yehovah.
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#12
I was going to refer exactly to that last article you linked to, justlurking. Nothing makes me crazy like YHWH being written out in English translations. The mind can't help but 'vocalize' it, even if one doesn't want to! Augh! (Normally when I see the Hebrew word I read "Hashem", as students are generally taught to - that or Adonai is usually taught, I should say. It means "the name".)
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#13
deleted
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#14
(11-01-2010, 08:21 PM)elizabee Wrote: I was going to refer exactly to that last article you linked to, justlurking. Nothing makes me crazy like YHWH being written out in English translations. The mind can't help but 'vocalize' it, even if one doesn't want to! Augh! (Normally when I see the Hebrew word I read "Hashem", as students are generally taught to - that or Adonai is usually taught, I should say. It means "the name".)
\

There is nothing wrong with saying the name. God revealed Himself to us and the words used are used for a reason (so we can communicate). We cannot communicate God as God is in any single word (the closest we get is "God as God is" or related statements).
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#15
I am not an expert, but it seems from what I have been reading lately that the pronounciation of the vowels in YHWH was lost, so God, Lord, or JesusChrist are the options we can use.
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#16
(11-01-2010, 09:51 PM)justlurking Wrote: I am not an expert, but it seems from what I have been reading lately that the pronounciation of the vowels in YHWH was lost, so God, Lord, or JesusChrist are the options we can use.

Pronunciation of Hebrew has changed in everything else.
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#17
We can discuss other religions in the appropriate subforum, posts deleted.

Further, there are rules about how they are discussed which these posts violated.  Knock it off.
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#18
(11-01-2010, 11:49 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: We can discuss other religions in the appropriate subforum, posts deleted.

Further, there are rules about how they are discussed which these posts violated.  Knock it off.

...was it something I missed? (I hope)
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#19
Quote:Can Catholics pray to Elohim or Yahweh?

No.
Catholics pray to God the Father, Son and Holy Ghost.

Whatever the others names are or were, Catholics consider them as strange gods or false gods and do not pray to them - ever........I just heard a sermon on this Sunday, feast of Christ the King.
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#20
(11-02-2010, 10:24 AM)Stubborn Wrote:
Quote:Can Catholics pray to Elohim or Yahweh?

No.
Catholics pray to God the Father, Son and Holy Ghost.

Whatever the others names are or were, Catholics consider them as strange gods or false gods and do not pray to them - ever........I just heard a sermon on this Sunday, feast of Christ the King.
Isaias 6:3 Wrote:And they cried one to another, and said: Holy, holy, holy, the Lord God of hosts, all the earth is full of his glory.

The Psalms use these names (or rather, since I am not familiar with most of the Psalms in Hebrew, I know one specifically does use one of the names) and the Church uses the Psalms in prayer. When praying the Psalms in Hebrew then, the names are used. Is this a false God?

Remember, "Elohim" means "God" (most often).
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