Do trad kids rebel?
#11
(10-31-2010, 01:00 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: "Do trad kids rebel?"

You might as well have asked, "Are trad kids human?"

The trouble is that people assume that "rebelling" is a normal part of being a teenager, which it's not. It's the norm among non-Catholics whereas it's much less common among trads....at least, from what I've seen. I know a lot of people who grew up trad who never had  a rebellious phase.

(10-31-2010, 11:44 AM)verenaerin Wrote:True, and what makes it so difficult is that each kid needs a different balance. That's why it is so critical for mothers and fathers to really know their children's personalities.

This is a really good point. There are undoubtedly kids who need more discipline and structure to keep them from going astray, and others who are perfectly fine with only gentle guidance who would be harmed by a stricter environment.
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#12
(10-31-2010, 01:37 PM)Iolanthe Wrote:
(10-31-2010, 01:00 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: "Do trad kids rebel?"

You might as well have asked, "Are trad kids human?"

The trouble is that people assume that "rebelling" is a normal part of being a teenager, which it's not. It's the norm among non-Catholics whereas it's much less common among trads....at least, from what I've seen. I know a lot of people who grew up trad who never had  a rebellious phase.

Rebellion is part of our fallen nature. It can be tamed but it never really goes away.

Christians should be better equipped to deal with it, sure, but they are not safe from it. That's what I meant.
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#13
(10-31-2010, 01:16 PM)Stubborn Wrote:
(10-31-2010, 01:00 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: "Do trad kids rebel?"

You might as well have asked, "Are trad kids human?"

Ditto.

Agreed.
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#14
(10-31-2010, 01:37 PM)Iolanthe Wrote:
(10-31-2010, 01:00 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: "Do trad kids rebel?"

You might as well have asked, "Are trad kids human?"

The trouble is that people assume that "rebelling" is a normal part of being a teenager, which it's not. It's the norm among non-Catholics whereas it's much less common among trads....at least, from what I've seen. I know a lot of people who grew up trad who never had  a rebellious phase.


True. I guess the outside influences from friends, classmates, heck, any exposure to society in general plays a big part in rebellious trad teens.
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#15
Whatever rebellion there is from traditionalist youth or anyone else has little to do with people being bad apples. Such happenings have more to do with the absurdly long childhood's which youth in the West, especially the United States, are kept under. This delayed maturation is almost universally pushed into the teenage years for Americans, and increasingly into the 20s nowadays.
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#16
Yep, and now we can keep the little darlings on our insurance until 26. That's two post graduate degrees, with the attendant drinking and carousing. My, my aren't we loving ?
tim
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#17
Yes they are able to rebel. The sad thing is that while parents are doing their best to hold things together, they get flack from the "holier than thou crowd." It's as if the sanctimonious vermin never heard of free will (as bestowed by God), Being a trad doesn't make you a saint. If I remember correctly, the sacrament of penance was a part of the Church before Vatican II!
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#18
(11-01-2010, 12:02 PM)OldMan Wrote: Yes they are able to rebel. The sad thing is that while parents are doing their best to hold things together, they get flack from the "holier than thou crowd." It's as if the sanctimonious vermin never heard of free will (as bestowed by God), Being a trad doesn't make you a saint. If I remember correctly, the sacrament of penance was a part of the Church before Vatican II!

-nods-

These people need to get over their pride and realize that they too, like everyone on this earth, are sinners.

Instead of looking down on these people who were led astray, they should be looking down with hands folded in prayer.
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#19
+JMJ+

Yes, traditional kids rebel. For many reasons.

One is that parents seem to think that the malls, their influence... the music... it's influence... is the same as it was when they were young, and therefore is simply part of growing up.

Today's influences are radically different than those of past generations.

Parents need to do their best to pray the Rosary as a family, starting at a very young age. Fathers - you need to lead. Our children need to see their dad's singing the Chant, assisting at Mass, and so forth. Catholic pictures, icons, statuary of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Saints... all help to create an environment in the home that is Catholic. Almost monastic. I've seen it work with my kids. They are not geeks. Not nerds.

Have good Catholic books on the shelves of your library. I go into so many Catholic homes on visits with my family, and see very few Catholic things... Touches here and there, but not to the extent where someone would walk in and go, "Wow, they really are Catholic!". Our kids (four) are already asking if they can have these things passed on to them when my wife and I are gone. They love them. They identify with them.

Get your children to Confession. Often. How? Lead by example. Especially the men.

Children's personalities must also be discerned and understood. Agreed. Huge. It involves spending quality time with our children. Quality time.

May I also recommend long walks in nature - God's Creation - morning, afternoon and evening. Suburban kids in particular are losing touch with nature and the natural world. They are disinterested. They get bored in nature, but not texting, surfing the net, or listening to their iPods. Nature is a wonderful place to teach reflection and recollection. Naturally.

Get your children wearing Brown Scapulars. Immediately. Instill in them a love, and a fear of Almighty God. Teach them, about the End Times, particularly Purgatory. Get your boys serving at Mass, and your girls in the choir. Get them familiar with Catholic culture. As soon as they are old enough. 

People criticize over-protection of children, then wonder why their kids go astray. We have a God-given responsibility to get our kids to Heaven. There is nothing in today's music or fashions, nor in the mall culture that has infected suburbia, even to the level of parents wearing the fashions of their teens... that is good for anyones spirituality. Shop as a family at thrift stores. Keep your kids as disinterested in malls as possible. If you can get them to understand there is nothing they need at the mall to actually live, and nothing that will help them spiritually at the mall, this is great. Our priests can also help here - have them over for dinner. Often.

Particularly watch music. As Fr. Wolfe says on AudioSancto - he has a tougher time getting cohabiting couples to purge their music collections that he does getting them to stop cohabitation.

Kill your television, as well. Get your children reading Catholic books, and books about the Saints, rather than rubbish of the pop culture like Harry Potter. There is nothing that will help a kid's Catholic spirituality reading books like Harry Potter (I know I'll get hammered for that, but I do not care)

Disconnect your kids from anything that can potentially hurt them spiritually. Ask your priest for guidance. 
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#20
(11-01-2010, 12:02 PM)OldMan Wrote: Yes they are able to rebel. The sad thing is that while parents are doing their best to hold things together, they get flack from the "holier than thou crowd." It's as if the sanctimonious vermin never heard of free will (as bestowed by God), Being a trad doesn't make you a saint. If I remember correctly, the sacrament of penance was a part of the Church before Vatican II!

I've seen this a lot, usually with couples whose children are still young. Being the oldest I saw my parents get flack from other starter couples who thought they would raise their kids perfectly and never run into the issues that my parents or their peer parents parents were having. They have a "my kids will never do that" mentality, then their kids grow up and bam! Often turn out the same or worse than the kids they were snobbing about in the first place. As much as it stings and one wants to be angry with those parents, it's still no fun to watch them be brought down and out of their idealistic ignorance either.

I wish it didn't work this way, sometimes the kids are really troubled and it is largely the parents fault but other times it's just those growing pains in making the Faith and its practice truly their own, instead of something they grew up with. Sometimes you realize what you had when it's gone and those years of unhappy rebellion end up bringing a child back to God. I think there are ways to minimize the transition so it's not so traumatic, ruralpeace has good point and insight on this, but I don't know about taking it away altogether.
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