Do trad kids rebel?
#31
I did not rebel as a teen, but then I was usually either sick, recovering/catching up with school work, or enjoying the rare instance of not doing either.  I was not raised trad, though.  I was always very anachronistic, prefering older things to the things of my generation.  So maybe I just rebelled against them instead of my parents?
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#32
(11-02-2010, 03:29 PM)OCLittleFlower Wrote: I did not rebel as a teen, but then I was usually either sick, recovering/catching up with school work, or enjoying the rare instance of not doing either.  I was not raised trad, though.  I was always very anachronistic, prefering older things to the things of my generation.  So maybe I just rebelled against them instead of my parents?

Wow! I could have written this post, except for the not raised trad part. We could be bosom buddies! I did rebel but it was very limited and lasted a short period of time, about a year. Even then it wasn't so much a rebellion as a difficulty figuring out what my boundaries were as an adult and how I wanted to handle myself. Sickness has played a big part in keeping me out of trouble though. As much as I have cursed it, it has forced me to detach and look at life a little differently and I have moments of gratitude for it. 
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#33
(10-31-2010, 01:00 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: "Do trad kids rebel?"

You might as well have asked, "Are trad kids human?"


And one might add..."Do trad parents rebel?"

hummm
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#34
(11-02-2010, 04:19 PM)wallflower Wrote:
(11-02-2010, 03:29 PM)OCLittleFlower Wrote: I did not rebel as a teen, but then I was usually either sick, recovering/catching up with school work, or enjoying the rare instance of not doing either.  I was not raised trad, though.  I was always very anachronistic, prefering older things to the things of my generation.  So maybe I just rebelled against them instead of my parents?

Wow! I could have written this post, except for the not raised trad part. We could be bosom buddies! I did rebel but it was very limited and lasted a short period of time, about a year. Even then it wasn't so much a rebellion as a difficulty figuring out what my boundaries were as an adult and how I wanted to handle myself. Sickness has played a big part in keeping me out of trouble though. As much as I have cursed it, it has forced me to detach and look at life a little differently and I have moments of gratitude for it. 

Same here.  On good days I would be thrilled just to do "normal" things, like sit with my friends at lunch or play with my rottweiler puppy and work on her training.  Write short stories for my friends in the online figure skating community, go skating, stuff like that.  I always figured drugs and alcohol and stuff like that would only mess up the things that I actually cared about.

Maybe that's a big chunk of it for kids.  Having something they care about enough to want to avoid messing up.
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#35
I wasn't raised trad, or even Catholic, but I didn't rebel in any meaningful sense as a kid. Unless you count converting to Catholicism... in that case, I was a hellraiser. Otherwise, I'm a good Asian kid who believes in filial piety. In fact, even after serving in the Army, I still live at home. Most Asians don't really see the point of moving out from your parents' house unless you're married, and even then, it's still questionable.
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#36
(11-02-2010, 04:57 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: In fact, even after serving in the Army, I still live at home. Most Asians don't really see the point of moving out from your parents' house unless you're married, and even then, it's still questionable.

i wish i was asian  ;D
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#37
To a poster somewhere above...everything you need to figure out what's wrong....is contained in your post.
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#38
"ruralpeace, it sounds like you're doing a lot of good things with your kids, but don't make the mistake of confusing hippyism with Catholicism"

Lolanthe:

What does this mean? Am I a treehugger because I prefer rural over suburbia? Because I call consumerism evil (it is). Would that make my priest a hippy, as well? I don't follow.... but do appreciate the compliment on what we are doing with the kids. My wife gets a lot of credit, as we homeschool.

introibo:

Good post. My third of four is the different one, as well. We homeschool, gals in skirts/dresses. All that "candyland" stuff! (Couldn't resist, sorry). Someone had posted about personalities - of parents really making he effort to understand each child's unique personality. It's an amazing task. I find it fun, with this one, as I was a bit of an odd duck myself (I was also the youngest - bad combination!)

Harlequin King:
"Most Asians don't really see the point of moving out from your parents' house unless you're married, and even then, it's still questionable."

This was a hige part of the Irish culture, as well. (I am cut of that cloth!)

Happy All Souls Day, by the way.

+JMJ+

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#39
Hell yes I rebelled! I went wild, I'm still a little wild come to think of it. Being a Traditionalist in no way stops a person from exploring things they shouldn't. Don't ever assume your kid won't do anything because they are a good kid at 13 or 14. I was a perfect boy until I found whiskey and women...
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#40
(11-02-2010, 05:16 PM)Scipio_a Wrote: To a poster somewhere above...everything you need to figure out what's wrong....is contained in your post.

I'm convinced.
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