The best thing to come out of the protestant revolt
#11
Southpaw, you bet I have. The Mainline Protties up north here are like four people in a Cathedral, very quiet, and alone.I ain't sure about the conservative south though. I think they still have some folks.It's the old "the fuction of x as it approaches y equals zero." Mainline Churches are liberal and as they become more completely liberal their membership falls to zero. Whereas the conservatives, even Protestants to the extent that they stick to their teachings retain their members. 's all.
tim
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#12
Grape juice has some serious anti-inflammatory properties, don't know if it's as present or less so in wine.
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#13
(11-05-2010, 09:27 AM)Restituo Wrote: lol awesome. How did Welch's grape juice come out of the revolt? I love that stuff.

-Resituo

I thought everybody knew the story of Welch's grape juice since it is printed on most of their bottles.

The short summary is from wiki.

In 1864, the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church expressly recommended that "in all cases the pure juice of the grape be used in the celebration of the Lord's Supper."[7] In 1865, Welch relocated to Vineland, New Jersey, where a sister already resided. Then in 1869, Welch discovered a method of pasteurizing grape juice so that fermentation was stopped, and the drink was non-alcoholic. He persuaded local churches to adopt this non-alcoholic "wine" for communion services, calling it "Dr. Welch's Unfermented Wine."

i guess you can call it an eventual by product of the protestant revolt.
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#14
Bach and the Christmas tree. The Christmas tree wasn't really started until Martin Luther.
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#15
(11-06-2010, 08:02 PM)Baskerville Wrote: The Christmas tree wasn't really started until Martin Luther.

I think you're thinking of the Advent Wreath.  ???
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#16
(11-06-2010, 11:36 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote:
(11-06-2010, 08:02 PM)Baskerville Wrote: The Christmas tree wasn't really started until Martin Luther.

I think you're thinking of the Advent Wreath.   ???

Really I knew that was a lutheran thing but I thought Christmas trees were too. I know in the middle ages it wasn't a custom to decorate trees and bring them indoors. I had heard that it was a Lutheran thing. But I read that in a secular history book so who knows. :shrug:
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#17
Baptist Mega Fellowships and the events they put on...Car shows...Holloween  in the parking lot...and how can anyobne decry the Wednesday potluck....Wednesday potluck has got to be the best thing to come out of it all.
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#18
(11-06-2010, 09:45 AM)Unum Sint Wrote:
(11-05-2010, 09:27 AM)Restituo Wrote: lol awesome. How did Welch's grape juice come out of the revolt? I love that stuff.

-Resituo

I thought everybody knew the story of Welch's grape juice since it is printed on most of their bottles.

The short summary is from wiki.

In 1864, the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church expressly recommended that "in all cases the pure juice of the grape be used in the celebration of the Lord's Supper."[7] In 1865, Welch relocated to Vineland, New Jersey, where a sister already resided. Then in 1869, Welch discovered a method of pasteurizing grape juice so that fermentation was stopped, and the drink was non-alcoholic. He persuaded local churches to adopt this non-alcoholic "wine" for communion services, calling it "Dr. Welch's Unfermented Wine."

i guess you can call it an eventual by product of the protestant revolt.

Interesting.  Juice as empty as their theology.  The two couldn't be better paired.
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#19
(11-07-2010, 06:52 AM)dymphna17 Wrote:
(11-06-2010, 09:45 AM)Unum Sint Wrote:
(11-05-2010, 09:27 AM)Restituo Wrote: lol awesome. How did Welch's grape juice come out of the revolt? I love that stuff.

-Resituo

I thought everybody knew the story of Welch's grape juice since it is printed on most of their bottles.

The short summary is from wiki.

In 1864, the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church expressly recommended that "in all cases the pure juice of the grape be used in the celebration of the Lord's Supper."[7] In 1865, Welch relocated to Vineland, New Jersey, where a sister already resided. Then in 1869, Welch discovered a method of pasteurizing grape juice so that fermentation was stopped, and the drink was non-alcoholic. He persuaded local churches to adopt this non-alcoholic "wine" for communion services, calling it "Dr. Welch's Unfermented Wine."

i guess you can call it an eventual by product of the protestant revolt.

Interesting.  Juice as empty as their theology.  The two couldn't be better paired.

Are you saying Welch's grape juice is not delicious?
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#20
To me, this goes right along with the thread about why smarter kids grow up to be heavier drinkers....grape juice, Protestant.....wine, Catholic.  :laughing:
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