St.Seraphim of Sarov russian Orthodox Saint
#21
(11-06-2010, 10:53 PM)Baskerville Wrote:
(11-06-2010, 10:33 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(11-06-2010, 10:31 PM)Baskerville Wrote:
(11-06-2010, 10:09 PM)justlurking Wrote: What about Gregory Palamas? I found his practices very reminiscent of (non christian) eastern meditation practices, but I think Uniates are allowed to do that and honour him

Yes Palamas had a whole weird thing with the "essence" of God and the Uniates ARE allowed to venerate him even though the west has declared what he teaches at least borderline heresy.

When were they allowed to venerate him? Before or after the Council?

Not sure. But I talked to a someone who is a uniate and he used him as his confirmation name.

That seems suspect, to say the least.

And given the fact that Uniates have been practically sold out to the Orthodox since the council, there's even more reason to be wary.
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#22
A short list of post-1054 Saints found on both Orthodox and Catholic calendars:
http://thebananarepublican.blogspot.com/...aints.html

[Image: archbishopstgregorypala.jpg]

Sanctus Gregorius Palamas, ora pro nobis!
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#23
St. Sergius of Radonezh is an example of a post schism saint recognized by the Catholic church. He is listed in the Roman Martyrology, for Sept. 25.
This was posted a while back on Angelqueen:

St. Sergius of Radonezh, Abbot (A.D. 1314-1392), was one of these Russian Orthodox saints allowed in the Russian Catholic calendar.

When in 1940 the Holy See authorized a liturgical calendar for the use of the few Russian Catholics it included, among other Slav modifications of the Byzantine calendar, the feasts of some thirty Russian saints, twenty-one of whom had not previously figured in any calendar in use today among Catholics. These last all lived after the trouble between Rome and Constantinople in 1054. Their admission to Catholic recognition is a further example of the Holy See's practical judgement that the separation of the Eastern Orthodox Church was not fully consummated till long after the excommunication of the patriarch Cerularius of Constantinople in that year, and in any case the consummation became complete in different places at different times. The choice of these saints, as Father Cyril Korolevsky has remarked (in Eastern Churches Quarterly, July 1946, p.394), "based upon impartial judgement, does not exclude the possibility of still other Russian saints being admitted when more progress has been made in the study of Slav hagiography".



According to Father Korolevsky this has no connexion, whether direct or indirect, with canonization. "When a dissident Eastern church [or part thereof] comes into the Catholic Church she brings into it all her rites and all her liturgy; so also her menology or liturgical calendar. Only what is directly or indirectly against faith is excluded --- but this does not prevent the need for there being well-chosen critical standards for the moral, historical and hagiographical aspects, so that the inclusion or exclusion of certain saints in a Catholic calendar can be decided upon, and so that the position of others can be submitted to fresh examination in accordance with developments in hagiographical studies." This is of course true. Nevertheless, from the point of view of the Church's present practice, it would canonically seem to be a case either of equivalent ("equipollent") canonization or of confirmation of cultus.



- Butler's Lives of the Saints, Thurston & Attwater Edition, Vol. III (July-Sept), pgs. 639-640"

I have kept a devotion to St. Seraphim myself.

C.

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#24
(11-06-2010, 11:12 PM)Cetil Wrote: Nevertheless, from the point of view of the Church's present practice, it would canonically seem to be a case either of equivalent ("equipollent") canonization or of confirmation of cultus.

Which may make sense canonically, but  theologically not really because for it to be under the Ordinary Magisterium veneration has to apply to the Universal Church, not just the Latin Rite.  So theologically it's not, in my mind, an equivalent canonization, though it may be a confirmation of a cultus that may later lead to canonization.

ETA:
Quote:According to Father Korolevsky this has no connexion, whether direct or indirect, with canonization

Which is the position that theologically makes sense.
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#25
Actually there was a discussion of this on Fisheaters some time ago. Anqelqueen was not the original source:
http://catholicforum.fisheaters.com/inde...843.0.html

C.
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#26
(11-06-2010, 11:06 PM)Marc Wrote: A short list of post-1054 Saints found on both Orthodox and Catholic calendars:
http://thebananarepublican.blogspot.com/...aints.html

[Image: archbishopstgregorypala.jpg]

Sanctus Gregorius Palamas, ora pro nobis!

Gregory Palamas is NOT a saint. He was a horrible heretic. May God have mercy on his soul.
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#27
(11-06-2010, 11:44 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: Gregory Palamas is NOT a saint. He was a horrible heretic. May God have mercy on his soul.

Well, given my acceptance of Palamite theology and the hesychastic tradition of the East (and West), I guess that makes me a heretic too. Boo!

Grow up, the Faith is larger than scholasticism.
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#28
(11-06-2010, 11:58 PM)Marc Wrote:
(11-06-2010, 11:44 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: Gregory Palamas is NOT a saint. He was a horrible heretic. May God have mercy on his soul.

Well, given my acceptance of Palamite theology and the hesychastic tradition of the East (and West), I guess that makes me a heretic too. Boo!

Grow up, the Faith is larger than scholasticism.

I'll stick with Catholic doctrine; if I wanted to be a Palamite, I'd convert to the religion of the heretical Eastern schismatics.
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#29
(11-06-2010, 11:44 PM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(11-06-2010, 11:06 PM)Marc Wrote: A short list of post-1054 Saints found on both Orthodox and Catholic calendars:
http://thebananarepublican.blogspot.com/...aints.html

[Image: archbishopstgregorypala.jpg]

Sanctus Gregorius Palamas, ora pro nobis!

Gregory Palamas is NOT a saint. He was a horrible heretic. May God have mercy on his soul.

What exactly is heretical about him? I remember back in my OC days some things sounded weird but what is heretical?
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#30
Is Hesychasm and Palamas, heretical? Is the Eastern Schismatics' "Eastern Orthodox Church," heretical?
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