Books/authors you feel obligated to like, but don't?
#11
(11-06-2010, 08:22 PM)Walty Wrote: Hemingway sucks.

True.
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#12
I mostly love Chesterton, but there are certain subjects that he doesn't handle well - he's too verbose and ponders too much instead of just reporting the facts.  Also his paper on the Shakespeare authorship question is appalling.

Mine is Tolkien.  God knows I tried with the Lord of the Ring but after a cycle of 5 pages of walking along the path, 5 pages of eating drinking and singing, 5 more pages of walking, 5 more pages of eating drinking and singing, I'd had enough.  Anyone else in the world not like him???
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#13
(11-06-2010, 07:15 PM)ecclesiastes Wrote: Saint Thérèse of Lisieux.

Her writings are generally a source of profound contemplative enlightenment.  Maybe she doesn't like you either?  :shrug:
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#14
Thomas Pynchon. I tried reading The Crying of Lot 49 a few years ago but couldn't finish. Perhaps I just need to try again...
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#15
Why would anyone feel obliged to like him though?  :dunce:
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#16
John Steinbeck. The Grapes of Wrath made me cry tears of boredom. I think it's the only book in all my English classes that I stopped reading.
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#17
I'm so happy I'm not the only one who doesn't like Faulkner and Hemingway. I'll go further and say I don't think they deserve their high reputations.

Fitzgerald wrote an exquisitely pure and ethereal prose, but he wrote about nothing.

Chesterton? I agree with the OP, at least in regard to works like "Orthodoxy." They're supposed to be all profound and wise and all, but really to me they just seem to be a witty man relishing his own wit and refusing to take serious matters with the sobriety they deserve. I have, however, greatly enjoyed the little I've read of his fiction.

Maya Angelou. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings was a fine novel, but her poetry sucks. It is laughably bad. And now in college literature courses, one is expected to take her seriously!

I absolutely adore C.S. Lewis, but Mere Christianity infuriates me. Yet everyone seems to love it, even Catholics, who should see its flaws in an instant.

I don't care much for spiritual reading thus far -- I get my spiritual insights from reading good novels and essays -- but I should say I share everyone's high opinion of Therese of Liseaux. I sort of understand how she could leave others cold, though.
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#18
(11-06-2010, 09:33 PM)Satori Wrote: Chesterton? I agree with the OP, at least in regard to works like "Orthodoxy." They're supposed to be all profound and wise and all, but really to me they just seem to be a witty man relishing his own wit and refusing to take serious matters with the sobriety they deserve.

I saw it as a collection of clever arguments that the average man can understand.  It's intellectual but down to earth.  Not everyone is a genius; it's great to have an author like Chesterton who can communicate intellectual subjects intelligibly.
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#19
(11-06-2010, 09:33 PM)Satori Wrote: Maya Angelou. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings was a fine novel, but her poetry sucks. It is laughably bad. And now in college literature courses, one is expected to take her seriously!

YES. Ugh. Oh my goodness, her poetry...I was given a book of her poetry one time and I just...stared...I put it on a shelf and I think it's still in that same location.
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#20
(11-06-2010, 07:54 PM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: We all had to read the "great" authors in high school......Faulkner, Milton, Cervantes, Dickens.  And who liked them then?? Almost any 16 or 17 year old is going to be immensely more worried about getting their driver's license or their next date rhan what Tolstoy had to say about the human condition.  And, even supposing a literary interest, a teenager simply has not lived enough to "get" these authors.  Sadly, high school English has probably done more tkovdecrease interest than increase.  But, picking up one of these authors when you are 30, 40, 50 and you have elittle under your belt can be very rewarding.....in my own case, I utterly loathed Dickens at 16; but, at 35 or so, I forced myself to give him another chance.  And when I did, I wept openly at Oliver Twist.....suffice it to say that I am not noted for sensitivity.

I read A Tale of Two Cities; it was my favorite book when I read it, and it still is. It actually inspired me to find our old collection of "great" books. In addition to the extravagant writing, the setting is one of my favorites in history - although it could have done well with more counterrevolution. Then again, the real event could have done well with more counterrevolution. The only cure is more counterrevolution.

In fact, I think a rereading is in order.
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