augstine baker
#31
(11-07-2010, 10:23 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Octopuses; octopi.

Since when do Latin paradigms apply to words of Greek origin (without being used in Latin ever)?

Octopi is plain wrong. Octopuses is the correct English plural of the English word, but the plural in a Greek paradigm would be octopodes.

Since the term is of recent origin and thoroughly Anglicanised (the script and the exact sounds are not Greek), Octopuses is correct.
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#32
(11-07-2010, 10:27 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:25 PM)Gladium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:23 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Octopuses; octopi.

I am fairly certain "octopi" is incorrect and, in its place, "octopodes" should be used.

I'm assuming we are talking about English plurals. I believe that "octopi" is one of the accepted plurals of the word.

"Octopodes" would be a correct plural for Greek.

It is in the dictionary, but then so is "google" as a verb.

It is "accepted" because it is common with the masses, not because it is sensible. If we have a choice, we should choose the sensible ones.

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#33
(11-07-2010, 10:28 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:23 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Octopuses; octopi.

Since when do Latin paradigms apply to words of Greek origin (without being used in Latin ever)?

I answered your question. "Octopuses" and "octopi" are both accepted as correct plural forms of "octopus".

I'm not saying I agree with it.
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#34
(11-07-2010, 10:28 PM)icecream Wrote: this thread is degnerating into somehting substantiial

And I won't back down.

I will start using Sanskrit paradigms for English words if I must so people realise the folly of using foreign grammar in assimilated words.

All those speaking English here understand what is meant by "octopi", but fewer know what "kine" means! (No hard data, but I'd bet money on it if I were the type to bet).
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#35
Sorry about this, icecream.  :laughing:
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#36
:laughing: :laughing: :laughing:

you make me luagh rosarium


thats good


shame you not a chick
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#37
(11-07-2010, 10:34 PM)paragon Wrote: Sorry about this, icecream.   :laughing:

hery it happens it happens ;D
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#38
(11-07-2010, 10:32 PM)Rosarium Wrote: All those speaking English here understand what is meant by "octopi", but fewer know what "kine" means!

I know. It's an archaic plural of "cow."
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#39
(11-07-2010, 10:35 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:32 PM)Rosarium Wrote: All those speaking English here understand what is meant by "octopi", but fewer know what "kine" means!

I know. It's an archaic plural of "cow."

It is a plural of cow. If we are to accept mangled Latin and Greek as correct, we should at least accept proper Modern English of any time as correct also.

Do you know what a "wether" is?

I learned this word today and I am curious why such a concept has its own word.

EDIT: I did not learn "kine" today obviously. I saw this word in an Early Modern English text in the same context as kine and had to look it up.
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#40
(11-07-2010, 10:40 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:35 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:32 PM)Rosarium Wrote: All those speaking English here understand what is meant by "octopi", but fewer know what "kine" means!

I know. It's an archaic plural of "cow."

It is a plural of cow. If we are to accept mangled Latin and Greek as correct, we should at least accept proper Modern English of any time as correct also.

I'm not against that. I find plurals such as "kine" rather elegant.

Quote:Do you know what a "wether" is?

No, I had to look it up in the dictionary. I'm not a native English speaker.

Apparently, it means "a castrated male sheep." Interesting.
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