What book(s) for prospective Catholic?
#1
What book(s) would you recommend for a prospective Catholic today, one who's almost entirely ignorant of Vatican II and all the rest of it?
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#2
As a straight  tool for catechisis, I think the easiest and most straightforward is the Baltimore Catechism. Aside from that, lot's of Chesterton.
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#3
Letter to confused catholics put out by the sspx, and most anything from tan publishing

http://www.tanbooks.com
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#4
(11-09-2010, 02:47 PM)Jitpring Wrote: What book(s) would you recommend for a prospective Catholic today, one who's almost entirely ignorant of Vatican II and all the rest of it?

I find that the simple texts of the Church such as the Imitation of Christ and other writings of saints are the best because they avoid the politics completely.
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#5
(11-09-2010, 06:17 PM)califman831 Wrote: Letter to confused catholics put out by the sspx

Crikey, don't give that to a newcomer - that'll just confuse them even more!  :fish:

Quote:I find that the simple texts of the Church such as the Imitation of Christ and other writings of saints are the best because they avoid the politics completely.

That's the problem isn't it?  If they're ignorant of V2 they'll just remain in the novus ordo and believe they're doing God's will.
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#6
(11-09-2010, 06:25 PM)paragon Wrote:
(11-09-2010, 06:17 PM)califman831 Wrote: Letter to confused catholics put out by the sspx

Crikey, don't give that to a newcomer - that'll just confuse them even more!  :fish:

Quote:I find that the simple texts of the Church such as the Imitation of Christ and other writings of saints are the best because they avoid the politics completely.

That's the problem isn't it?  If they're ignorant of V2 they'll just remain in the novus ordo and believe they're doing God's will.

Directly addressing it in the beginning leads easily to lost faith completely. Addressing the human flaws first is a way to tarnish one's image of the Church. If one focused on the simple truths first, it makes it easier to address them.
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#7
Depends on the person - if their faith is that fragile, maybe they're not ready to become a Catholic at all.  I found out about it pretty close to the start and it actually increased my devotion once I knew there was some meat in the sandwich, rather than just some watered-down flowery protestant liturgy.

I recall, upon first seeing the NO mass, thinking "is that it??  That looks like that protty junk I remember from when I was a very young kid!  I thought it'd be so much more solemn!"  I knew nothing about V2 at that point.
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#8
(11-09-2010, 06:21 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(11-09-2010, 02:47 PM)Jitpring Wrote: What book(s) would you recommend for a prospective Catholic today, one who's almost entirely ignorant of Vatican II and all the rest of it?

I find that the simple texts of the Church such as the Imitation of Christ and other writings of saints are the best because they avoid the politics completely.

Imitation of Christ was actually the product of a very political movement: Devotio Moderna. :)
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#9
(11-09-2010, 02:47 PM)Jitpring Wrote: What book(s) would you recommend for a prospective Catholic today, one who's almost entirely ignorant of Vatican II and all the rest of it?

Pre-Vatican II catechisms, such as the Baltimore Catechism and Mass No. 3. There are also some recently-published books on the TLM.

After they've learned the Faith, I'd suggest The Great Facade and The Rhine Flows into the Tiber, but most especially Iota Unum.

One central concept that should be understood is that many in the Church adopted the New Theology while abandoning Scholasticism, and this is near to the heart of the modern crisis (one symptom being the ambiguity that permeates so many Vatican documents of the last 50 years).
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